twain - Gemela

NOTICE.

Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.

attempting - intentando; intentar, tentativa, intento, ensayo

motive - motivo, móbil

narrative - narrativo, narrativa, narración

prosecuted - rocesado; procesar

moral - moral, moraleja

banished - desterrado; desterrar

plot - argumento, trama, hilo argumental, intriga, plano

shot - tiro, disparo; (shoot) tiro, disparo

BY ORDER OF THE AUTHOR

PER G. G., CHIEF OF ORDNANCE.

chief - jefe, principal

ordnance - artillería

EXPLANATORY

explanatory - explicativo

In this book a number of dialects are used, to wit: the Missouri negro dialect; the extremest form of the backwoods Southwestern dialect; the ordinary "Pike County" dialect; and four modified varieties of this last. The shadings have not been done in a haphazard fashion, or by guesswork; but painstakingly, and with the trustworthy guidance and support of personal familiarity with these several forms of speech.

dialects - ialectos; dialecto

wit - agudeza, ingenio, chispa, gracia

Missouri - Misuri

negro - negro, negra

Backwoods - Madera vieja

southwestern - suroeste, del sudoeste

Pike - lucio

county - condado

modified - modificado; modificar

shadings - sombreado

haphazard - al azar; a su aire, inconsistente, sin ton ni son, fortuito

guesswork - adivinanza, conjeturas, suposiciones

trustworthy - de fiar; fidedigno, fiable, de confianza, confiable

guidance - dirección, orientación, consejo

familiarity - intimidad, impertinencia, familiaridad

I make this explanation for the reason that without it many readers would suppose that all these characters were trying to talk alike and not succeeding.

alike - igual, semejante, parecido, igualmente

THE AUTHOR.

CHAPTER I.

Chapter - capítulo, sede, sección

You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. That book was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly. There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth. That is nothing.

Sawyer - aserrador

truth - verdad

mainly - principalmente

stretched - estirado; estirar, estirarse, dar, extenderse, estirón

I never seen anybody but lied one time or another, without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly"Tom's Aunt Polly, she is"and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all told about in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers, as I said before.

lied - Mentiste

widow - viuda, enviudar

Mary - María

all told - lo dicho; todos dijeron

stretchers - camillas; camilla, bastidor, ensanchador, viga, polín

Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found the money that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We got six thousand dollars apiece"all gold. It was an awful sight of money when it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put it out at interest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year round"more than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer I lit out.

winds - vientos; viento, aire

robbers - ladrones; ladrón, ladrona

cave - cueva, caverna

apiece - cada uno

sight - vista, lugar de interés, espectáculo, panorama, visor, mira, ver

piled up - amontonar, apilar, acumular

judge - juez; juzgar

fetched - conseguido; ir por, ir a buscar, traer

sivilize - Sivilizar

rough - aspero; áspero, aproximado, aproximativo, casi, turbulento

dismal - lúgubre; mísero, miserable, triste, deprimente

decent - decente

I got into my old rags and my sugar-hogshead again, and was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So I went back.

rags - trapos; trapo

hogshead - cabeza de cerdo; bocoy

satisfied - satisfecho; satisfacer

hunted - cazado; cazar, buscar, caza

respectable - respetable

The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, and she called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harm by it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up. Well, then, the old thing commenced again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and you had to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn't go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them,"that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself.

lamb - cordero, carne de cordero, borrego, borrega

harm - dano; dano, danar

sweat - sudor

cramped - estrecho; calambre, rampa, acalambrarse, coartar, inmovilizar

commenced - comenzado; comenzar, empezar, iniciar, principiar

rung - picado; escalón; (ring) picado; escalón

bell - campana

supper - cenar; cena

tuck - meter; pliegue

grumble - grunir; refunfunar, rezongar

victuals - Virtual

though - ero..; no obstante, de todas formas, de todas maneras

warn - alertar, avisar, advertir

In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up, and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.

barrel - barril, tonel, canón, cano, embarrilar

odds - probabilidades; guacho, desparejado, desemparejado, suelto

mixed - mezclado; mezclar

swaps - Intercambio

After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses and the Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but by-and-by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable long time; so then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take no stock in dead people.

Moses - Moisés; (mos); Moisés

considerable - considerable

stock - cciones; existencias, stock

Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it. Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, and no use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of fault with me for doing a thing that had some good in it.

wasn - Era

bothering - molestando; molestar, agobiar, cansón, joroba, rayos, caramba

kin - familia, parientes

fault - defecto, falla, culpa, falta

And she took snuff, too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself.

took snuff - Tomar rapé

Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on, had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with a spelling-book. She worked me middling hard for about an hour, and then the widow made her ease up. I couldn't stood it much longer. Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watson would say, "Don't put your feet up there, Huckleberry;" and "Don't scrunch up like that, Huckleberry"set up straight;" and pretty soon she would say, "Don't gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry"why don't you try to behave?" Then she told me all about the bad place, and I said I wished I was there. She got mad then, but I didn't mean no harm.

tolerable - tolerable, soportable, checktolerable, checkaceptable

slim - flaco, delgado, adelgazarse, enflaquecer, enflaquecerse

old maid - Solterona

spelling-book - (spelling-book) libro de ortografía, abecedario

ease up - relajarse; aflojar

deadly dull - muy aburrido

fidgety - Inquieta

scrunch - recoger; arrugar

stretch - estirar, estirarse, dar, extenderse, estirón, estiramiento

mad - loco, trastornado, zumbado, enfadado, enojado

All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said; said she wouldn't say it for the whole world; she was going to live so as to go to the good place. Well, I couldn't see no advantage in going where she was going, so I made up my mind I wouldn't try for it. But I never said so, because it would only make trouble, and wouldn't do no good.

wicked - malvado, cruel, insoportable; (wick) malvado, cruel

Now she had got a start, and she went on and told me all about the good place. She said all a body would have to do there was to go around all day long with a harp and sing, forever and ever. So I didn't think much of it. But I never said so. I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight. I was glad about that, because I wanted him and me to be together.

harp - arpa, harpa

forever - para siempre, por siempre, constantemente, sin cesar, eternidad

reckoned - contó; considerar

Glad - feliz, alegre, contento

Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome. By-and-by they fetched the niggers in and had prayers, and then everybody was off to bed. I went up to my room with a piece of candle, and put it on the table. Then I set down in a chair by the window and tried to think of something cheerful, but it warn't no use. I felt so lonesome I most wished I was dead. The stars were shining, and the leaves rustled in the woods ever so mournful; and I heard an owl, away off, who-whooing about somebody that was dead, and a whippowill and a dog crying about somebody that was going to die; and the wind was trying to whisper something to me, and I couldn't make out what it was, and so it made the cold shivers run over me. Then away out in the woods I heard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it wants to tell about something that's on its mind and can't make itself understood, and so can't rest easy in its grave, and has to go about that way every night grieving.

pecking - Picoteando; (pec) Picoteando

tiresome - cansino; fatigoso, cansador, agotador

lonesome - solo; solitario

niggers - negros; negro, negra, negrata, mayate

prayers - Oración

candle - una vela; vela, candela, cirio

cheerful - alegre; animado

shining - brillante; brillar

rustled - susurrado; crujido

mournful - lúgubre; melancólico, lastimero

Owl - búho, lechuza, tecolote

whooing - Guau

wind - viento, aire

whisper - susurro, rumor, rastro, susurrar

shivers - escalofríos; temblar, tiritar, estremecerse

ghost - fantasma, espectro, espíritu, aparecido

grave - tumba

grieving - duelo; afligirse, acongojarse

I got so down-hearted and scared I did wish I had some company. Pretty soon a spider went crawling up my shoulder, and I flipped it off and it lit in the candle; and before I could budge it was all shriveled up. I didn't need anybody to tell me that that was an awful bad sign and would fetch me some bad luck, so I was scared and most shook the clothes off of me. I got up and turned around in my tracks three times and crossed my breast every time; and then I tied up a little lock of my hair with a thread to keep witches away. But I hadn't no confidence. You do that when you've lost a horseshoe that you've found, instead of nailing it up over the door, but I hadn't ever heard anybody say it was any way to Keep off bad luck when you'd killed a spider.

crawling - Arrastrándose; (crawl) Arrastrándose

flipped - volteado; tirar al aire

budge - ceder; mover

shriveled - arrugado; arrugar

fetch - ir por, ir a buscar, traer

breast - pecho, seno, teta, corazón, pechuga

thread - hilo, hebra, hilaza, tema, argumento, hilazón, subproceso

witches - brujas; bruja

confidence - confianza; certeza, certeza propia, certidumbre, confidencia

horseshoe - herradura, herrar

nailing - Clavar; (nail) Clavar

Keep off - mantenerse alejado de; prohibido pisar

I set down again, a-shaking all over, and got out my pipe for a smoke; for the house was all as still as death now, and so the widow wouldn't know. Well, after a long time I heard the clock away off in the town go boom"boom"boom"twelve licks; and all still again"stiller than ever. Pretty soon I heard a twig snap down in the dark amongst the trees"something was a stirring.

pipe - pipa; caramillo, flauta ), tubo de órgano, tubería, tubo

boom - boom, auge

licks - lamidas; lamer

twig - rama; ramita

snap - chasquido, crujido, chasquido de dedos, fotografía, foto

amongst - entre

I set still and listened. Directly I could just barely hear a "me-yow! me-yow!" down there. That was good! Says I, "me-yow! me-yow!" as soft as I could, and then I put out the light and scrambled out of the window on to the shed. Then I slipped down to the ground and crawled in among the trees, and, sure enough, there was Tom Sawyer waiting for me.

directly - directamente, en derechura

just barely - apenas

yow - Cómo

scrambled - revuelto; gatear, revolver, arrebato, arrebatina

shed - cobertizo, nave

slipped - se resbaló; resbalar

crawled - se arrastró; avanzar lentamente

CHAPTER II.

We went tiptoeing along a path amongst the trees back towards the end of the widow's garden, stooping down so as the branches wouldn't scrape our heads. When we was passing by the kitchen I fell over a root and made a noise. We scrouched down and laid still.

tiptoeing - punta del pie, caminar de puntillas

path - camino, sendero

stooping - inclinarse, agacharse

branches - ramas; rama, sucursal, delegación, filial, ramo, ramificar

scrape - raspar, aranarse, rasparse, abrasión, rasponazo, pelea, pinada

passing by - pasando por aquí

root - raíz

scrouched - Rascado

laid - tirado; poner, colocar

Miss Watson's big nigger, named Jim, was setting in the kitchen door; we could see him pretty clear, because there was a light behind him. He got up and stretched his neck out about a minute, listening. Then he says:

nigger - negro, negra, negrata, mayate

setting in - instalarse,establecerse; poner

"Who dah?"

He listened some more; then he come tiptoeing down and stood right between us; we could a touched him, nearly. Well, likely it was minutes and minutes that there warn't a sound, and we all there so close together. There was a place on my ankle that got to itching, but I dasn't scratch it; and then my ear begun to itch; and next my back, right between my shoulders.

itching - Picazón; (itch) Picazón

scratch - rascar, raspar, aranar, rasgunar, rayar, aranazo, rayadura

Seemed like I'd die if I couldn't scratch. Well, I've noticed that thing plenty times since. If you are with the quality, or at a funeral, or trying to go to sleep when you ain't sleepy"if you are anywheres where it won't do for you to scratch, why you will itch all over in upwards of a thousand places. Pretty soon Jim says:

ve - e

plenty - bastante; abundancia

funeral - funeral

sleepy - tienes sueno; sueno, cansado, adormecido, sonoliento

itch - picazón

upwards - hacia arriba

"Say, who is you? Whar is you? Dog my cats ef I didn'hear sumf'n. Well, I know what I's gwyne to do: I's gwyne to set down here and listen tell I hears it agin."

ef - efe

So he set down on the ground betwixt me and Tom. He leaned his back up against a tree, and stretched his legs out till one of them most touched one of mine. My nose begun to itch. It itched till the tears come into my eyes. But I dasn't scratch. Then it begun to itch on the inside. Next I got to itching underneath. I didn't know how I was going to set still.

betwixt - entre medias; entre

leaned - apoyado; inclinarse

itched - picazón

Tears - lágrimas; lágrima

underneath - abajo, por debajo, bajos

This miserableness went on as much as six or seven minutes; but it seemed a sight longer than that. I was itching in eleven different places now. I reckoned I couldn't stand it more'n a minute longer, but I set my teeth hard and got ready to try. Just then Jim begun to breathe heavy; next he begun to snore"and then I was pretty soon comfortable again.

miserableness - Miserabilidad

got ready - Prepararse, arreglarse

breathe - respirar

snore - roncar, ronquido

Tom he made a sign to me"kind of a little noise with his mouth"and we went creeping away on our hands and knees. When we was ten foot off Tom whispered to me, and wanted to tie Jim to the tree for fun. But I said no; he might wake and make a disturbance, and then they'd find out I warn't in. Then Tom said he hadn't got candles enough, and he would slip in the kitchen and get some more. I didn't want him to try.

creeping - reptando; reptar, hormigueo, fatiga

whispered - susurrado; susurro, rumor, rastro, susurrar

disturbance - disturbio, estorbo, perturbación

candles - velas; vela, candela, cirio

slip in - deslizarse; colar; meter

I said Jim might wake up and come. But Tom wanted to resk it; so we slid in there and got three candles, and Tom laid five cents on the table for pay. Then we got out, and I was in a sweat to get away; but nothing would do Tom but he must crawl to where Jim was, on his hands and knees, and play something on him. I waited, and it seemed a good while, everything was so still and lonesome.

slid - Se deslizó; (slide); deslizar, resbalar, tobogán, resbaladilla

crawl - gatear; avanzar lentamente

As soon as Tom was back we cut along the path, around the garden fence, and by-and-by fetched up on the steep top of the hill the other side of the house. Tom said he slipped Jim's hat off of his head and hung it on a limb right over him, and Jim stirred a little, but he didn't wake. Afterwards Jim said the witches bewitched him and put him in a trance, and rode him all over the State, and then set him under the trees again, and hung his hat on a limb to show who done it. And next time Jim told it he said they rode him down to New Orleans; and, after that, every time he told it he spread it more and more, till by-and-by he said they rode him all over the world, and tired him most to death, and his back was all over saddle-boils. Jim was monstrous proud about it, and he got so he wouldn't hardly notice the other niggers. Niggers would come miles to hear Jim tell about it, and he was more looked up to than any nigger in that country. Strange niggers would stand with their mouths open and look him all over, same as if he was a wonder.

garden fence - cerca de jardín

steep - mpinada; empinado

hung - colgado; colgar

limb - miembro

stirred - agitado; remover, revolver

afterwards - después

bewitched - hechizado; hechizar, embrujar

Orleans - Orleans

spread - extender, dispersar, esparcir, untar, diseminar, difundir

saddle - silla de montar; (bici) sillín, silla (de montar)

monstrous - monstruoso

proud - orgulloso

hardly - apenas, a duras penas

wonder - me pregunto; maravilla, milagro, genio, asombro, pasmo

Niggers is always talking about witches in the dark by the kitchen fire; but whenever one was talking and letting on to know all about such things, Jim would happen in and say, "Hm! What you know 'bout witches?" and that nigger was corked up and had to take a back seat. Jim always kept that five-center piece round his neck with a string, and said it was a charm the devil give to him with his own hands, and told him he could cure anybody with it and fetch witches whenever he wanted to just by saying something to it; but he never told what it was he said to it. Niggers would come from all around there and give Jim anything they had, just for a sight of that five-center piece; but they wouldn't touch it, because the devil had had his hands on it. Jim was most ruined for a servant, because he got stuck up on account of having seen the devil and been rode by witches.

bout - ataque (med), rato

whenever - cuándo; cuando quiera, siempre que, siempre y cuando

corked up - atascado

center - centro, meollo, pívot, pivote, central, centrar, mediar

string - cordel, mecate, usic, cadena, cuerda, enhebrar, encordar

charm - encanto

devil - demonio; diablo

cure - curar, remediar

ruined - arruinado; ruina, desbaratar, arruinar, estropear, dar al traste

servant - sirviente, criado, mozo, doméstico

got stuck - Quedarse atascado

stuck up - se ha atascado

account - cuenta

Well, when Tom and me got to the edge of the hilltop we looked away down into the village and could see three or four lights twinkling, where there was sick folks, maybe; and the stars over us was sparkling ever so fine; and down by the village was the river, a whole mile broad, and awful still and grand.

edge - orilla, borde, lado, arista, ventaja, filo

hilltop - Cima de la colina

twinkling - parpadeando; (twinkle); titilar, fulgurar, refulgir

folks - pueblo, gente

sparkling - chispeante; centelleante, gaseoso, efervescente

broad - amplio; ancho

grand - grande; magnífico, espléndido, imponente

We went down the hill and found Jo Harper and Ben Rogers, and two or three more of the boys, hid in the old tanyard. So we unhitched a skiff and pulled down the river two mile and a half, to the big scar on the hillside, and went ashore.

Rogers - rogers; Rogelio

tanyard - Tanatorio

unhitched - Desenganchar

pulled down - bajar, demoler, abatir

scar - cicatriz

hillside - adera; falda

ashore - en tierra

"Now, we'll start this band of robbers and call it Tom Sawyer's Gang. Everybody that wants to join has got to take an oath, and write his name in blood."

gang - pandilla; grupo, cuadrilla, equipo

oath - juramento, jurar

Everybody was willing. So Tom got out a sheet of paper that he had wrote the oath on, and read it. It swore every boy to stick to the band, and never tell any of the secrets; and if anybody done anything to any boy in the band, whichever boy was ordered to kill that person and his family must do it, and he mustn't eat and he mustn't sleep till he had killed them and hacked a cross in their breasts, which was the sign of the band.

swore - lo juraste; jurar

stick - palo; clavar

whichever - cualquier, cualquiera que, el que sea

mustn - No debe

hacked - hackeado; cortar, tajar

breasts - senos; pecho, seno, teta, corazón, pechuga

And nobody that didn't belong to the band could use that mark, and if he did he must be sued; and if he done it again he must be killed. And if anybody that belonged to the band told the secrets, he must have his throat cut, and then have his carcass burnt up and the ashes scattered all around, and his name blotted off of the list with blood and never mentioned again by the gang, but have a curse put on it and be forgot forever.

sued - demandado; (sue); demandar

throat - garganta, tráquea, cuello

carcass - cadáver, carcasa

ashes - cenizas; ceniza

scattered - dispersión; dispersar, esparcir, desviar

blotted - borrado; mancha, desdoro, emborronar, manchar

curse - maldición; maldecir

Everybody said it was a real beautiful oath, and asked Tom if he got it out of his own head. He said, some of it, but the rest was out of pirate-books and robber-books, and every gang that was high-toned had it.

pirate - pirata, bucanero, barco pirata, piratear

robber - ladrón, ladrona

toned - tonificado; tono

Some thought it would be good to kill the families of boys that told the secrets. Tom said it was a good idea, so he took a pencil and wrote it in. Then Ben Rogers says:

"Here's Huck Finn, he hain't got no family; what you going to do 'bout him?"

"Well, hain't he got a father?" says Tom Sawyer.

"Yes, he's got a father, but you can't never find him these days. He used to lay drunk with the hogs in the tanyard, but he hain't been seen in these parts for a year or more."

lay - poner, colocar

hogs - cerdos; cerdo, puerco, marrano

They talked it over, and they was going to rule me out, because they said every boy must have a family or somebody to kill, or else it wouldn't be fair and square for the others. Well, nobody could think of anything to do"everybody was stumped, and set still. I was most ready to cry; but all at once I thought of a way, and so I offered them Miss Watson"they could kill her. Everybody said:

stumped - perplejo; tocón, tueco, estaca, poste

offered - ofrecido; ofrecer

"Oh, she'll do. That's all right. Huck can come in."

That's all right - Está bien

Then they all stuck a pin in their fingers to get blood to sign with, and I made my mark on the paper.

stuck - atascado; clavar

pin - alfiler

"Now," says Ben Rogers, "what's the line of business of this Gang?"

"Nothing only robbery and murder," Tom said.

robbery - robo

murder - asesinato, asesinar, cepillarse, devorar

"But who are we going to rob?"houses, or cattle, or""

rob - robar

cattle - ganado, ganado bovino

"Stuff! stealing cattle and such things ain't robbery; it's burglary," says Tom Sawyer. "We ain't burglars. That ain't no sort of style. We are highwaymen. We stop stages and carriages on the road, with masks on, and kill the people and take their watches and money."

stuff - cosas, bártulos, cosa, coso, materia, atiborrar, rellenar

burglary - robo; allanamiento de morada

highwaymen - hombres de la carretera; bandolero, salteador

carriages - carrozas; coche, carruaje

masks - máscaras; máscara, careta, mascarilla

"Must we always kill the people?"

"Oh, certainly. It's best. Some authorities think different, but mostly it's considered best to kill them"except some that you bring to the cave here, and keep them till they're ransomed."

authorities - autoridad, policía, autoridades, fuerzas del orden, autorización

ransomed - rescate, rescatar

"Ransomed? What's that?"

"I don't know. But that's what they do. I've seen it in books; and so of course that's what we've got to do."

"But how can we do it if we don't know what it is?"

"Why, blame it all, we've got to do it. Don't I tell you it's in the books? Do you want to go to doing different from what's in the books, and get things all muddled up?"

blame - culpar, responsabilizar, echar la culpa

muddled - enredado; mezclar, confundir, embrollar, zarabutear, machacar

"Oh, that's all very fine to say, Tom Sawyer, but how in the nation are these fellows going to be ransomed if we don't know how to do it to them?"that's the thing I want to get at. Now, what do you reckon it is?"

nation - nación

fellows - companeros; tipo

reckon - te parece; considerar

"Well, I don't know. But per'aps if we keep them till they're ransomed, it means that we keep them till they're dead."

aps - ps

"Now, that's something like. That'll answer. Why couldn't you said that before? We'll keep them till they're ransomed to death; and a bothersome lot they'll be, too"eating up everything, and always trying to get loose."

bothersome - hostigoso, irritante, molestoso

eating up - comiendo

loose - suelto; flojo

"How you talk, Ben Rogers. How can they get loose when there's a guard over them, ready to shoot them down if they move a peg?"

guard - guarda, guardia, guardés, guarda, tapador, bloque

shoot - disparar, lanzar

peg - clavija, tarugo, colgador, perchero, gancho, fijar, tachar

"A guard! Well, that is good. So somebody's got to set up all night and never get any sleep, just so as to watch them. I think that's foolishness. Why can't a body take a club and ransom them as soon as they get here?"

foolishness - tonterías; sandez, tontería

ransom - rescate, rescatar

"Because it ain't in the books so"that's why. Now, Ben Rogers, do you want to do things regular, or don't you?"that's the idea. Don't you reckon that the people that made the books knows what's the correct thing to do? Do you reckon you can learn 'em anything? Not by a good deal. No, sir, we'll just go on and ransom them in the regular way."

that's why - por eso

don't you? - ?No es así?

"All right. I don't mind; but I say it's a fool way, anyhow. Say, do we kill the women, too?"

I don't mind - No me importa.

fool - idiota; bobo, imbécil, necio, pendejo, bufón, loco

anyhow - de todos modos; de todas maneras, de todas formas, comoquiera

"Well, Ben Rogers, if I was as ignorant as you I wouldn't let on. Kill the women? No; nobody ever saw anything in the books like that. You fetch them to the cave, and you're always as polite as pie to them; and by-and-by they fall in love with you, and never want to go home any more."

ignorant - ignorante, ignaro, inculto

let on - soltar, compartir un secreto

pie - tarta, empanada, pastel

"Well, if that's the way I'm agreed, but I don't take no stock in it. Mighty soon we'll have the cave so cluttered up with women, and fellows waiting to be ransomed, that there won't be no place for the robbers. But go ahead, I ain't got nothing to say."

mighty - poderoso

cluttered - abarrotado; desorden, revoltijo, enredo

ahead - al frente de, delante de, adelante

Little Tommy Barnes was asleep now, and when they waked him up he was scared, and cried, and said he wanted to go home to his ma, and didn't want to be a robber any more.

So they all made fun of him, and called him cry-baby, and that made him mad, and he said he would go straight and tell all the secrets. But Tom give him five cents to Keep quiet, and said we would all go home and meet next week, and rob somebody and kill some people.

made fun - hacer mofa; burlarse

Keep quiet - guardar silencio, callar

Ben Rogers said he couldn't get out much, only Sundays, and so he wanted to begin next Sunday; but all the boys said it would be wicked to do it on Sunday, and that settled the thing. They agreed to get together and fix a day as soon as they could, and then we elected Tom Sawyer first captain and Jo Harper second captain of the Gang, and so started home.

settled - resuelto; instalar, colocar

elected - elegido; elegir, electo

captain - capitán, capitanear, pilotar

I clumb up the shed and crept into my window just before day was breaking. My new clothes was all greased up and clayey, and I was dog-tired.

crept - se arrastró; reptar, hormigueo, fatiga

Greased - agradecido; grasa, engrasar, checklubricar

clayey - arcilloso

CHAPTER III.

Well, I got a good going-over in the morning from old Miss Watson on account of my clothes; but the widow she didn't scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay, and looked so sorry that I thought I would behave a while if I could. Then Miss Watson she took me in the closet and prayed, but nothing come of it. She told me to pray every day, and whatever I asked for I would get it.

scold - reganar; reganar, retar, renir

grease - grasa, engrasar, checklubricar

clay - arcilla, barro

closet - ropero, armario, clóset

prayed - rezó; rezar, orar

whatever - qué; cualquier, lo que sea que, cualquier cosa que, no importa

But it warn't so. I tried it. Once I got a fish-line, but no hooks. It warn't any good to me without hooks. I tried for the hooks three or four times, but somehow I couldn't make it work. By-and-by, one day, I asked Miss Watson to try for me, but she said I was a fool. She never told me why, and I couldn't make it out no way.

hooks - ganchos; gancho, garfio, enganchar

somehow - de algún modo, de alguna manera, de alguna forma

I set down one time back in the woods, and had a long think about it. I says to myself, if a body can get anything they pray for, why don't Deacon Winn get back the money he lost on pork? Why can't the widow get back her silver snuffbox that was stole? Why can't Miss Watson fat up? No, says I to myself, there ain't nothing in it. I went and told the widow about it, and she said the thing a body could get by praying for it was "spiritual gifts." This was too many for me, but she told me what she meant"I must help other people, and do everything I could for other people, and look out for them all the time, and never think about myself. This was including Miss Watson, as I took it. I went out in the woods and turned it over in my mind a long time, but I couldn't see no advantage about it"except for the other people; so at last I reckoned I wouldn't worry about it any more, but just let it go.

Deacon - diácono

pork - cerdo, puerco

snuffbox - tabaquera

praying - Rezando; (pray) Rezando

spiritual - espiritual, espiritual

Sometimes the widow would take me one side and talk about Providence in a way to make a body's mouth water; but maybe next day Miss Watson would take hold and knock it all down again. I judged I could see that there was two Providences, and a poor chap would stand considerable show with the widow's Providence, but if Miss Watson's got him there warn't no help for him any more. I thought it all out, and reckoned I would belong to the widow's if he wanted me, though I couldn't make out how he was a-going to be any better off then than what he was before, seeing I was so ignorant, and so kind of low-down and ornery.

take hold - afianzar(se)

judged - juzgado; juzgar

providences - rovidencias; Providence

chap - chico; tío, tipo

ornery - intratable; terco

Pap he hadn't been seen for more than a year, and that was comfortable for me; I didn't want to see him no more. He used to always whale me when he was sober and could get his hands on me; though I used to take to the woods most of the time when he was around. Well, about this time he was found in the river drownded, about twelve mile above town, so people said. They judged it was him, anyway; said this drownded man was just his size, and was ragged, and had uncommon long hair, which was all like pap; but they couldn't make nothing out of the face, because it had been in the water so long it warn't much like a face at all.

pap - Papá

whale - ballena

sober - sobrio, sereno, apagado

drownded - Ahogado

ragged - Desgarrado; (rag) Desgarrado

uncommon - incomún; raro, poco común, extrano, poco frecuente

They said he was floating on his back in the water. They took him and buried him on the bank. But I warn't comfortable long, because I happened to think of something. I knowed mighty well that a drownded man don't float on his back, but on his face. So I knowed, then, that this warn't pap, but a woman dressed up in a man's clothes. So I was uncomfortable again. I judged the old man would turn up again by-and-by, though I wished he wouldn't.

floating - flotante, flotador; (float); flotar, carroza

buried - enterrado; enterrar

knowed - Sabía

uncomfortable - incómodo, a disgusto, cohibido

We played robber now and then about a month, and then I resigned. All the boys did. We hadn't robbed nobody, hadn't killed any people, but only just pretended. We used to hop out of the woods and go charging down on hog-drivers and women in carts taking garden stuff to market, but we never hived any of them. Tom Sawyer called the hogs "ingots," and he called the turnips and stuff "julery," and we would go to the cave and powwow over what we had done, and how many people we had killed and marked. But I couldn't see no profit in it. One time Tom sent a boy to run about town with a blazing stick, which he called a slogan (which was the sign for the Gang to get together), and then he said he had got secret news by his spies that next day a whole parcel of Spanish merchants and rich A-rabs was going to camp in Cave Hollow with two hundred elephants, and six hundred camels, and over a thousand "sumter" mules, all loaded down with di'monds, and they didn't have only a guard of four hundred soldiers, and so we would lay in ambuscade, as he called it, and kill the lot and scoop the things. He said we must slick up our swords and guns, and get ready.

resigned - renunció; dimitir

robbed - robado; robar

pretended - fingido; fingir, de mentirijillas

hop - saltar a la pata coja

charging - cargando; cargo, acusación, encargo, figura, acusar, cobrar

hog - cerdo, puerco, marrano

carts - carros; carro, carreta

ingots - lingotes; lingote

turnips - nabos; nabo

profit - ganancias; ganancia, beneficio, explotar, beneficiarse

blazing - ardiendo; llamarada, incendio; resplandor

slogan - eslogan, consigna, lema

spies - espías; espía, chivato, espiar

parcel - paquete, parcela, hatajo, embalar, parcelar

Spanish - espanol; espanol, castellano, espanol, castellano, hispano

merchants - comerciantes; comerciante, mercader

rabs - Robas

hollow - hueco

camels - camellos; camello

mules - mulas; mula

loaded - cargado; carga

Scoop - cucharón, sacabolas de helado, cucharazo, cucharada, primicia

slick - escurridizo; manoso

swords - espadas; espada, gladio

He never could go after even a turnip-cart but he must have the swords and guns all scoured up for it, though they was only lath and broomsticks, and you might scour at them till you rotted, and then they warn't worth a mouthful of ashes more than what they was before. I didn't believe we could lick such a crowd of Spaniards and A-rabs, but I wanted to see the camels and elephants, so I was on hand next day, Saturday, in the ambuscade; and when we got the word we rushed out of the woods and down the hill. But there warn't no Spaniards and A-rabs, and there warn't no camels nor no elephants. It warn't anything but a Sunday-school picnic, and only a primer-class at that. We busted it up, and chased the children up the hollow; but we never got anything but some doughnuts and jam, though Ben Rogers got a rag doll, and Jo Harper got a hymn-book and a tract; and then the teacher charged in, and made us drop everything and cut.

turnip - nabo

cart - carro, carreta

scoured - registrado; fregar, restregar

lath - torneado; listón

rotted - pudriéndose; pudrir, podrir, putrefacción, podre

worth - vale la pena; valor

mouthful - Un bocado

lick - lamer

Spaniards - espanoles; espanol, espanola

rushed - apurado; precipitarse, lanzarse, correr, ir rápidamente

sunday-school - (sunday-school) la escuela dominical

picnic - jira, pícnic

primer - Imprimación; (prim) Imprimación

busted - arrestado; busto, pecho

chased - perseguido; perseguir

doughnuts - donuts; dona, rosquilla, anillo, dónut

rag - trapo

doll - muneca

hymn-book - (hymn-book) libro de himnos

tract - tracto; extensión

charged - cargado; cargo, acusación, encargo, figura, acusar, cobrar

"Why," said he, "a magician could call up a lot of genies, and they would hash you up like nothing before you could say Jack Robinson. They are as tall as a tree and as big around as a church."

magician - mago, fenómeno, checkhechicero

genies - genios; genio

hash - almohadilla

Jack - Juanito, Jacobo, Santiago

"Well," I says, "s'pose we got some genies to help us"can't we lick the other crowd then?"

pose - postura, pose

"How you going to get them?"

"I don't know. How do they get them?"

"Why, they rub an old tin lamp or an iron ring, and then the genies come tearing in, with the thunder and lightning a-ripping around and the smoke a-rolling, and everything they're told to do they up and do it. They don't think nothing of pulling a shot-tower up by the roots, and belting a Sunday-school superintendent over the head with it"or any other man."

Rub - frotación, frotamiento, frote, frotar

tin - estano, lata, enlatar, estanar

iron - hierro; férreo, planchar

tearing - desgarro; lágrima

thunder - trueno, estruendo, fragor, tronar

lightning - un rayo; relámpago, rayo

ripping - desgarro; rasgar, desgarrar

rolling - rodando; rolar; (roll) rodando; rolar

roots - raíces; raíz

Superintendent - superintendente, director, supervisor

"Who makes them tear around so?"

tear - desgarro; lágrima

"Why, whoever rubs the lamp or the ring. They belong to whoever rubs the lamp or the ring, and they've got to do whatever he says. If he tells them to build a palace forty miles long out of di'monds, and fill it full of chewing-gum, or whatever you want, and fetch an emperor's daughter from China for you to marry, they've got to do it"and they've got to do it before sun-up next morning, too.

Whoever - a quién; cualquier, cualesquiera, cualquiera, quien

rubs - frotes; frotación, frotamiento, frote, frotar

ring - anillo

miles long - millas de largo

chewing-gum - (chewing-gum) chicle

Emperor - emperador

And more: they've got to waltz that palace around over the country wherever you want it, you understand."

waltz - vals, valsar, bailar vals

wherever - dónde; adondequiera, doquier

"Well," says I, "I think they are a pack of flat-heads for not keeping the palace themselves 'stead of fooling them away like that. And what's more"if I was one of them I would see a man in Jericho before I would drop my business and come to him for the rubbing of an old tin lamp."

fooling - Bromeando; (fool); bobo, imbécil, necio, pendejo, bufón, loco

Jericho - Jericó

rubbing - Frotar; (rub); frotación, frotamiento, frote, frotar

"How you talk, Huck Finn. Why, you'd have to come when he rubbed it, whether you wanted to or not."

rubbed - frotado; frotación, frotamiento, frote, frotar

whether - si, si , o, ya sea

"What! and I as high as a tree and as big as a church? All right, then; I would come; but I lay I'd make that man climb the highest tree there was in the country."

"Shucks, it ain't no use to talk to you, Huck Finn. You don't seem to know anything, somehow"perfect saphead."

Shucks - Caramba; (shuck) Caramba

I thought all this over for two or three days, and then I reckoned I would see if there was anything in it. I got an old tin lamp and an iron ring, and went out in the woods and rubbed and rubbed till I sweat like an Injun, calculating to build a palace and sell it; but it warn't no use, none of the genies come.

Injun - Un indio

calculating - calculando; calcular

So then I judged that all that stuff was only just one of Tom Sawyer's lies. I reckoned he believed in the A-rabs and the elephants, but as for me I think different. It had all the marks of a Sunday-school.

CHAPTER IV.

Well, three or four months run along, and it was well into the winter now. I had been to school most all the time and could spell and read and write just a little, and could say the multiplication table up to six times seven is thirty-five, and I don't reckon I could ever get any further than that if I was to live forever. I don't take no stock in mathematics, anyway.

Multiplication - multiplicación

At first I hated the school, but by-and-by I got so I could stand it. Whenever I got uncommon tired I played hookey, and the hiding I got next day done me good and cheered me up. So the longer I went to school the easier it got to be. I was getting sort of used to the widow's ways, too, and they warn't so raspy on me. Living in a house and sleeping in a bed pulled on me pretty tight mostly, but before the cold weather I used to slide out and sleep in the woods sometimes, and so that was a rest to me. I liked the old ways best, but I was getting so I liked the new ones, too, a little bit.

cheered - aclamado; viva, hurra

raspy - rasposo; ronco

tight - apretado, ajustado, tensado, tensionado, tenso

slide - deslizar, resbalar, tobogán, resbaladilla, resbaladero

The widow said I was coming along slow but sure, and doing very satisfactory. She said she warn't ashamed of me.

coming along - espabilarse; aparecer; acompanar; progresar

satisfactory - satisfactorio

ashamed - avergonzado, abochornado, apenado

One morning I happened to turn over the salt-cellar at breakfast. I reached for some of it as quick as I could to throw over my left shoulder and keep off the bad luck, but Miss Watson was in ahead of me, and crossed me off. She says, "Take your hands away, Huckleberry; what a mess you are always making!" The widow put in a good word for me, but that warn't going to keep off the bad luck, I knowed that well enough.

cellar - sótano, bodega

at breakfast - en el desayuno

throw over - dejar plantado, romper con alguien; abandonar; lanzar por encima

mess - desastre, enredo, lío

put in a good word for - hablar bien de alguien, recomendar a alguien

I started out, after breakfast, feeling worried and shaky, and wondering where it was going to fall on me, and what it was going to be. There is ways to keep off some kinds of bad luck, but this wasn't one of them kind; so I never tried to do anything, but just poked along low-spirited and on the watch-out.

shaky - tembloroso

wondering - Te preguntas; (wonder); maravilla, milagro, genio, asombro

poked - pinchado; meter

spirited - enérgico; espíritu, alma, onda, alcohol, bebida espirituosa

I went down to the front garden and clumb over the stile where you go through the high board fence. There was an inch of new snow on the ground, and I seen somebody's tracks. They had come up from the quarry and stood around the stile a while, and then went on around the garden fence. It was funny they hadn't come in, after standing around so.

front garden - jardín delantero

stile - dos escalones de madera para pasar por encima de una cerca

fence - valla; cerca, cerramiento, barda, perista

inch - pulgada

quarry - cantera

I couldn't make it out. It was very curious, somehow. I was going to follow around, but I stooped down to look at the tracks first. I didn't notice anything at first, but next I did. There was a cross in the left boot-heel made with big nails, to keep off the devil.

Curious - tienes curiosidad; curioso; extrano, raro

stooped - encorvado; inclinarse, agacharse

heel - tacón; talón

nails - unas; una

I was up in a second and shinning down the hill. I looked over my shoulder every now and then, but I didn't see nobody. I was at Judge Thatcher's as quick as I could get there. He said:

shinning - brillando; espinilla

"Why, my boy, you are all out of breath. Did you come for your interest?"

breath - respiración, aliento, respiro

"No, sir," I says; "is there some for me?"

"Oh, yes, a half-yearly is in, last night"over a hundred and fifty dollars. Quite a fortune for you. You had better let me invest it along with your six thousand, because if you take it you'll spend it."

yearly - anuales; anual, anualmente, cada ano

Fortune - fortuna

invest - invertir

"No, sir," I says, "I don't want to spend it. I don't want it at all"nor the six thousand, nuther. I want you to take it; I want to give it to you"the six thousand and all."

nuther - Más

He looked surprised. He couldn't seem to make it out. He says:

"Why, what can you mean, my boy?"

I says, "Don't you ask me no questions about it, please. You'll take it"won't you?"

He says:

"Well, I'm puzzled. Is something the matter?"

puzzled - rompecabezas, enigma, puzle, acertijo, intrigar, dejar perplejo

"Please take it," says I, "and Don't ask me nothing"then I won't have to tell no lies."

Don't ask - No preguntes

He studied a while, and then he says:

"Oho-o! I think I see. You want to sell all your property to me"not give it. That's the correct idea."

property - propiedad, posesión, inmueble, bien

Then he wrote something on a paper and read it over, and says:

"There; you see it says ˜for a consideration.'That means I have bought it of you and paid you for it. Here's a dollar for you. Now you sign it."

consideration - consideración

So I signed it, and left.

Miss Watson's nigger, Jim, had a hair-ball as big as your fist, which had been took out of the fourth stomach of an ox, and he used to do magic with it. He said there was a spirit inside of it, and it knowed everything. So I went to him that night and told him pap was here again, for I found his tracks in the snow. What I wanted to know was, what he was going to do, and was he going to stay? Jim got out his hair-ball and said something over it, and then he held it up and dropped it on the floor. It fell pretty solid, and only rolled about an inch. Jim tried it again, and then another time, and it acted just the same. Jim got down on his knees, and put his ear against it and listened. But it warn't no use; he said it wouldn't talk. He said sometimes it wouldn't talk without money. I told him I had an old slick counterfeit quarter that warn't no good because the brass showed through the silver a little, and it wouldn't pass nohow, even if the brass didn't show, because it was so slick it felt greasy, and so that would tell on it every time.

fist - puno

ox - buey

magic - magia, mágico, embrujar

spirit - espíritu, alma, onda, alcohol, bebida espirituosa

solid - sólido, masivo, macizo, continuo, junto, sólido, cuerpo

rolled - rodando; rollo

counterfeit - falsificación; contrahecho, falsificado, trucho, contrahechura

brass - latón

nohow - Cómo

greasy - grasiento, grasoso, resbaloso

(I reckoned I wouldn't say nothing about the dollar I got from the judge.) I said it was pretty bad money, but maybe the hair-ball would take it, because maybe it wouldn't know the difference. Jim smelt it and bit it and rubbed it, and said he would manage so the hair-ball would think it was good. He said he would split open a raw Irish potato and stick the quarter in between and keep it there all night, and next morning you couldn't see no brass, and it wouldn't feel greasy no more, and so anybody in town would take it in a minute, let alone a hair-ball. Well, I knowed a potato would do that before, but I had forgot it.

split - fisura, escisión, partir, dividir, escindir, repartir

raw - cruda; crudo, en carne viva, bruto

Irish - irlandés, irlandeses

Jim put the quarter under the hair-ball, and got down and listened again. This time he said the hair-ball was all right. He said it would tell my whole fortune if I wanted it to. I says, go on. So the hair-ball talked to Jim, and Jim told it to me. He says:

"Yo'ole father doan'know yit what he's a-gwyne to do. Sometimes he spec he'll go 'way, en den agin he spec he'll stay. De bes'way is to res'easy en let de ole man take his own way. Dey's two angels hoverin'roun''bout him. One uv 'em is white en shiny, en t'other one is black. De white one gits him to go right a little while, den de black one sail in en bust it all up. A body can't tell yit which one gwyne to fetch him at de las'. But you is all right. You gwyne to have considable trouble in yo'life, en considable joy. Sometimes you gwyne to git hurt, en sometimes you gwyne to git sick; but every time you's gwyne to git well agin. Dey's two gals flyin''bout you in yo'life.

yit - Sí

spec - especificaciones

den - guarida

angels - ángeles; ángel

hoverin - Pasando el rato

roun - Run

shiny - reluciente, refulgente, brillante

bust - reventar; busto, pecho

considable - Considerable

joy - alegría, júbilo

flyin - volando

One uv 'em's light en t'other one is dark. One is rich en t'other is po'. You's gwyne to marry de po'one fust en de rich one by en by. You wants to keep 'way fum de water as much as you kin, en don't run no resk, 'kase it's down in de bills dat you's gwyne to git hung."

fust - Primero

Dat - Qué

When I lit my candle and went up to my room that night there sat pap his own self!

self - yo; uno mismo

CHAPTER V.

I had shut the door to. Then I turned around and there he was. I used to be scared of him all the time, he tanned me so much. I reckoned I was scared now, too; but in a minute I see I was mistaken"that is, after the first jolt, as you may say, when my breath sort of hitched, he being so unexpected; but right away after I see I warn't scared of him worth bothring about.

tanned - bronceado; curtir

jolt - sacudida; sacudir, traquetear

hitched - enganchado; inconveniente, contratiempo

unexpected - inesperado, inopinado

bothring - Ambos

He was most fifty, and he looked it. His hair was long and tangled and greasy, and hung down, and you could see his eyes shining through like he was behind vines. It was all black, no gray; so was his long, mixed-up whiskers. There warn't no color in his face, where his face showed; it was white; not like another man's white, but a white to make a body sick, a white to make a body's flesh crawl"a tree-toad white, a fish-belly white.

tangled - enredado; desorden, marana, enredo

shining through - Brillar a través de; notarse, lucir

vines - enredaderas; vid, trepadora, enredadera

Gray - Gris

whiskers - bigotes; vibrisa, bigote

flesh - carne, pellejo, descarnar

toad - sapo, sapa

belly - barriga, panza, vientre, guata

As for his clothes"just rags, that was all. He had one ankle resting on t'other knee; the boot on that foot was busted, and two of his toes stuck through, and he worked them now and then. His hat was laying on the floor"an old black slouch with the top caved in, like a lid.

toes - dedos de los pies; dedo del pie, ortejo

laying on - poner encima de algo; aprovisionar

caved - cedió; cueva, caverna

lid - tapa

I stood a-looking at him; he set there a-looking at me, with his chair tilted back a little. I set the candle down. I noticed the window was up; so he had clumb in by the shed. He kept a-looking me all over. By-and-by he says:

tilted - inclinado; inclinar, ladear

"Starchy clothes"very. You think you're a good deal of a big-bug, don't you?"

starchy - con almidón; almidonado, acartonado

bug - chinche, bicho, error, fallo, defecto, bug, manía

"Maybe I am, maybe I ain't," I says.

"Don't you give me none o'your lip," says he. "You've put on considerable many frills since I been away. I'll take you down a peg before I get done with you. You're educated, too, they say"can read and write. You think you're better'n your father, now, don't you, because he can't? I'll take it out of you. Who told you you might meddle with such hifalut'n foolishness, hey?"who told you you could?"

lip - labio, labro

frills - volantes; volante

educated - educado; educar, instruir

meddle - entrometerse, inmiscuirse, injerirse, mangonear

"The widow. She told me."

"The widow, hey?"and who told the widow she could put in her shovel about a thing that ain't none of her business?"

shovel - pala, traspalar, palear

"Nobody never told her."

"Well, I'll learn her how to meddle. And looky here"you drop that school, you hear? I'll learn people to bring up a boy to put on airs over his own father and let on to be better'n what he is. You lemme catch you fooling around that school again, you hear?

put on airs - darse aires

fooling around - hacer el tonto, holgazanear, tener relaciones, jugar con

Your mother couldn't read, and she couldn't write, nuther, before she died. None of the family couldn't before they died. I can't; and here you're a-swelling yourself up like this. I ain't the man to stand it"you hear? Say, lemme hear you read."

swelling - inflamación, hinchazón; (swell); inflamación, hinchazón

I took up a book and begun something about General Washington and the wars. When I'd read about a half a minute, he fetched the book a whack with his hand and knocked it across the house. He says:

Washington - Washington

whack - porrazo, trompazo, cebollazo, golpear

"It's so. You can do it. I had my doubts when you told me. Now looky here; you stop that putting on frills. I won't have it. I'll lay for you, my smarty; and if I catch you about that school I'll tan you good. First you know you'll get religion, too. I never see such a son."

doubts - dudas; dudar, duda, incertidumbre

tan - curtir

get religion - convertirse; empezar a esforzarse/ preocuparse

He took up a little blue and yaller picture of some cows and a boy, and says:

"What's this?"

"It's something they give me for learning my lessons good."

He tore it up, and says:

tore - Romper

"I'll give you something better"I'll give you a cowhide."

cowhide - piel de vaca; cuero vacuno

He set there a-mumbling and a-growling a minute, and then he says:

mumbling - murmurando; (mumble); mascullar, mascujar, susurrar, mascujada

growling - Grunendo; (growl); rugido, grunir

"Ain't you a sweet-scented dandy, though? A bed; and bedclothes; and a look'n'-glass; and a piece of carpet on the floor"and your own father got to sleep with the hogs in the tanyard. I never see such a son. I bet I'll take some o'these frills out o'you before I'm done with you. Why, there ain't no end to your airs"they say you're rich. Hey?"how's that?"

scented - con aroma; olor, esencia, olfato, fragancia, oler

dandy - dandy, dandi, gomoso, petimetre

bedclothes - ropa de cama

bet - apostar

"They lie"that's how."

"Looky here"mind how you talk to me; I'm a-standing about all I can stand now"so don't gimme no sass. I've been in town two days, and I hain't heard nothing but about you bein'rich. I heard about it away down the river, too. That's why I come. You git me that money to-morrow"I want it."

Gimme - Me das

sass - descaro, descoco

morrow - manana; manana

"I hain't got no money."

"It's a lie. Judge Thatcher's got it. You git it. I want it."

"I hain't got no money, I tell you. You ask Judge Thatcher; he'll tell you the same."

"All right. I'll ask him; and I'll make him pungle, too, or I'll know the reason why. Say, how much you got in your pocket? I want it."

"I hain't got only a dollar, and I want that to""

"It don't make no difference what you want it for"you just shell it out."

shell - cascarón; concha, cáscara, vaina, caparazón, casquete, terminal

He took it and bit it to see if it was good, and then he said he was going down town to get some whisky; said he hadn't had a drink all day.

When he had got out on the shed he put his head in again, and cussed me for putting on frills and trying to be better than him; and when I reckoned he was gone he come back and put his head in again, and told me to mind about that school, because he was going to lay for me and lick me if I didn't drop that.

Cussed - Maldecir

Next day he was drunk, and he went to Judge Thatcher's and bullyragged him, and tried to make him give up the money; but he couldn't, and then he swore he'd make the law force him.

force - fuerza

The judge and the widow went to law to get the court to take me away from him and let one of them be my guardian; but it was a new judge that had just come, and he didn't know the old man; so he said courts mustn't interfere and separate families if they could help it; said he'd druther not take a child away from its father. So Judge Thatcher and the widow had to quit on the business.

guardian - guardián, guardia, apoderado, tutor, custodio, jefe

Courts - tribunales; patio, callejón, corte, tribunal, juzgado

interfere - panish: t-needed

quit - renunciar; abandonar

That pleased the old man till he couldn't rest. He said he'd cowhide me till I was black and blue if I didn't raise some money for him. I borrowed three dollars from Judge Thatcher, and pap took it and got drunk, and went a-blowing around and cussing and whooping and carrying on; and he kept it up all over town, with a tin pan, till most midnight; then they jailed him, and next day they had him before court, and jailed him again for a week.

got drunk - se emborrachó

cussing - Maldecir

whooping - Gritando; (whoop) Gritando

carrying on - continuar, seguir

pan - cacerola; cazuela, cazo, sartén (para freír), ..

jailed - encarcelado; cárcel, prisión, presidio, penal

Court - patio, callejón, corte, tribunal, juzgado

But he said he was satisfied; said he was boss of his son, and he'd make it warm for him.

When he got out the new judge said he was a-going to make a man of him. So he took him to his own house, and dressed him up clean and nice, and had him to breakfast and dinner and supper with the family, and was just old pie to him, so to speak. And after supper he talked to him about temperance and such things till the old man cried, and said he'd been a fool, and fooled away his life; but now he was a-going to turn over a new leaf and be a man nobody wouldn't be ashamed of, and he hoped the judge would help him and not look down on him.

temperance - templanza, temperancia

fooled - enganado; bobo, imbécil, necio, pendejo, bufón, loco

leaf - hoja, tablero

The judge said he could hug him for them words; so he cried, and his wife she cried again; pap said he'd been a man that had always been misunderstood before, and the judge said he believed it. The old man said that what a man wanted that was down was sympathy, and the judge said it was so; so they cried again. And when it was bedtime the old man rose up and held out his hand, and says:

hug - abrazo, abrazar

misunderstood - malentendido; malentender

sympathy - simpatía; compasión, empatía, compasión

bedtime - hora de acostarse; hora de dormir

"Look at it, gentlemen and ladies all; take a-hold of it; shake it. There's a hand that was the hand of a hog; but it ain't so no more; it's the hand of a man that's started in on a new life, and'll die before he'll go back. You mark them words"don't forget I said them. It's a clean hand now; shake it"don't be afeard."

gentlemen - caballeros; caballero, senores

So they shook it, one after the other, all around, and cried. The judge's wife she kissed it. Then the old man he signed a pledge"made his mark. The judge said it was the holiest time on record, or something like that. Then they tucked the old man into a beautiful room, which was the spare room, and in the night some time he got powerful thirsty and clumb out on to the porch-roof and slid down a stanchion and traded his new coat for a jug of forty-rod, and clumb back again and had a good old time; and towards daylight he crawled out again, drunk as a fiddler, and rolled off the porch and broke his left arm in two places, and was most froze to death when somebody found him after sun-up.

kissed - besado; besar

pledge - prometer, comprometerse, hipotecar, empenar, pignorar

holiest - el más sagrado; santo, sagrado

tucked - metido; pliegue

spare - de repuesto; prescindir, pasar sin

powerful - poderoso

porch - pórtico, porche

stanchion - puntales; puntal

traded - comerciado; comercio, gremio, compraventa, comerciar, mercadear

jug - jarro, jarra

rod - barra, rodillo, cana, vara, bastón, verga, barra

froze - se congeló; congelar

And when they come to look at that spare room they had to take soundings before they could navigate it.

soundings - Sonando

navigate - navegar

The judge he felt kind of sore. He said he reckoned a body could reform the old man with a shotgun, maybe, but he didn't know no other way.

sore - dolorido; doloroso

Reform - reforma, reformar

shotgun - escopeta -s

CHAPTER VI.

Well, pretty soon the old man was up and around again, and then he went for Judge Thatcher in the courts to make him give up that money, and he went for me, too, for not stopping school. He catched me a couple of times and thrashed me, but I went to school just the same, and dodged him or outrun him most of the time. I didn't want to go to school much before, but I reckoned I'd go now to spite pap. That law trial was a slow business"appeared like they warn't ever going to get started on it; so every now and then I'd borrow two or three dollars off of the judge for him, to keep from getting a cowhiding. Every time he got money he got drunk; and every time he got drunk he raised Cain around town; and every time he raised Cain he got jailed.

catched - Atrapado

thrashed - golpeado; vapulear

dodged - squivado; evadir, esquivar, capear

spite - rencor

trial - proceso, juicio

cowhiding - esconder vacas; cuero vacuno

Cain - Caín

He was just suited"this kind of thing was right in his line.

He got to hanging around the widow's too much and so she told him at last that if he didn't quit using around there she would make trouble for him. Well, wasn't he mad? He said he would show who was Huck Finn's boss.

hanging - Colgando; (hang) Colgando

So he watched out for me one day in the spring, and catched me, and took me up the river about three mile in a skiff, and crossed over to the Illinois shore where it was woody and there warn't no houses but an old log hut in a place where the timber was so thick you couldn't find it if you didn't know where it was.

watched out - se ha vigilado

Illinois - Illinois

shore - oribera; costa, playa

woody - Lenoso

log - registro; tronco, leno

hut - cabana

timber - madera de construcción

He kept me with him all the time, and I never got a chance to run off. We lived in that old cabin, and he always locked the door and put the key under his head nights. He had a gun which he had stole, I reckon, and we fished and hunted, and that was what we lived on. Every little while he locked me in and went down to the store, three miles, to the ferry, and traded fish and game for whisky, and fetched it home and got drunk and had a good time, and licked me.

cabin - barraca, cabana, cabina, camarote

ferry - ferri, transbordador

licked - lamido; lamer

The widow she found out where I was by-and-by, and she sent a man over to try to get hold of me; but pap drove him off with the gun, and it warn't long after that till I was used to being where I was, and liked it"all but the cowhide part.

It was kind of lazy and jolly, laying off comfortable all day, smoking and fishing, and no books nor study. Two months or more run along, and my clothes got to be all rags and dirt, and I didn't see how I'd ever got to like it so well at the widow's, where you had to wash, and eat on a plate, and comb up, and go to bed and get up regular, and be forever bothering over a book, and have old Miss Watson pecking at you all the time.

jolly - alegre, divertido, gracioso

laying off - despedir a alguien; dejar algo

dirt - suciedad, mugor, tierra, mugre, trapos sucios

comb - peine

I didn't want to go back no more. I had stopped cussing, because the widow didn't like it; but now I took to it again because pap hadn't no objections. It was pretty good times up in the woods there, take it all around.

objections - objeciones; objeción, protesta

But by-and-by pap got too handy with his hick'ry, and I couldn't stand it. I was all over welts. He got to going away so much, too, and locking me in. Once he locked me in and was gone three days. It was dreadful lonesome. I judged he had got drownded, and I wasn't ever going to get out any more. I was scared. I made up my mind I would fix up some way to leave there. I had tried to get out of that cabin many a time, but I couldn't find no way. There warn't a window to it big enough for a dog to get through. I couldn't get up the chimbly; it was too narrow. The door was thick, solid oak slabs. Pap was pretty careful not to leave a knife or anything in the cabin when he was away; I reckon I had hunted the place over as much as a hundred times; well, I was most all the time at it, because it was about the only way to put in the time.

handy - a mano, cercano

hick - Pueblerino

welts - ronchas; vira

dreadful - terrible; espantoso, espantosa

fix up - Arreglar

oak - roble, encina, carrasca

slabs - placas; losa

place over - Colocar encima

But this time I found something at last; I found an old rusty wood-saw without any handle; it was laid in between a rafter and the clapboards of the roof. I greased it up and went to work. There was an old horse-blanket nailed against the logs at the far end of the cabin behind the table, to keep the wind from blowing through the chinks and putting the candle out. I got under the table and raised the blanket, and went to work to saw a section of the big bottom log out"big enough to let me through. Well, it was a good long job, but I was getting towards the end of it when I heard pap's gun in the woods. I got rid of the signs of my work, and dropped the blanket and hid my saw, and pretty soon pap come in.

rusty - Oxidado

handle - manejar; mango; asa; manilla, pomo(puerta)

laid in - recoger

rafter - jácena; viga

clapboards - Tablilla

blanket - manta, capa, general

nailed - clavado; una

logs - registros; tronco, leno

chinks - chinos; resquicio, grieta

log out - Cerrar sesión

rid - cabalgar; librar

Pap warn't in a good humor"so he was his natural self. He said he was down town, and everything was going wrong. His lawyer said he reckoned he would win his lawsuit and get the money if they ever got started on the trial; but then there was ways to put it off a long time, and Judge Thatcher knowed how to do it. And he said people allowed there'd be another trial to get me away from him and give me to the widow for my guardian, and they guessed it would win this time.

going wrong - equivocarse; salir mal

lawsuit - demanda; proceso judicial, proceso, pleito, litigio

This shook me up considerable, because I didn't want to go back to the widow's any more and be so cramped up and sivilized, as they called it. Then the old man got to cussing, and cussed everything and everybody he could think of, and then cussed them all over again to make sure he hadn't skipped any, and after that he polished off with a kind of a general cuss all round, including a considerable parcel of people which he didn't know the names of, and so called them what's-his-name when he got to them, and went right along with his cussing.

sivilized - Sivilizado

Cuss - Maldecir

skipped - saltado; saltar

polished - pulido; polaco, polonés, polaco

He said he would like to see the widow get me. He said he would watch out, and if they tried to come any such game on him he knowed of a place six or seven mile off to stow me in, where they might hunt till they dropped and they couldn't find me. That made me pretty uneasy again, but only for a minute; I reckoned I wouldn't stay on hand till he got that chance.

Stow - estibar; guardar, poner, colocar

hunt - cazar, buscar, caza

uneasy - inquieta; inquieto

The old man made me go to the skiff and fetch the things he had got. There was a fifty-pound sack of corn meal, and a side of bacon, ammunition, and a four-gallon jug of whisky, and an old book and two newspapers for wadding, besides some tow. I toted up a load, and went back and set down on the bow of the skiff to rest.

sack - saco

corn - cereales (maíz, trigo, avena)

bacon - tocino

ammunition - municiones; munición

gallon - galón

wadding - Guata; (wad) Guata

besides - además; al lado de, cabe

tow - remolque; remolcar

toted - llevado; ninito, nene, chiquitín

load - cargar; carga

bow - arco; inclinar(se), hacer una reverencia

I thought it all over, and I reckoned I would walk off with the gun and some lines, and take to the woods when I run away. I guessed I wouldn't stay in one place, but just tramp right across the country, mostly night times, and hunt and fish to keep alive, and so get so far away that the old man nor the widow couldn't ever find me any more. I judged I would saw out and leave that night if pap got drunk enough, and I reckoned he would. I got so full of it I didn't notice how long I was staying till the old man hollered and asked me whether I was asleep or drownded.

tramp - vagabundo, vagabunda, golfa, ramera, puta

keep alive - Mantener vivo

hollered - gritó; gritar

I got the things all up to the cabin, and then it was about dark. While I was cooking supper the old man took a swig or two and got sort of warmed up, and went to ripping again. He had been drunk over in town, and laid in the gutter all night, and he was a sight to look at. A body would a thought he was Adam"he was just all mud. Whenever his liquor begun to work he most always went for the govment, this time he says:

swig - un trago; lingotazo

gutter - arroyo, cuneta, canal, canalón

Adam - Adam, Adán

mud - barro, lodo

liquor - jugo, licor

govment - gobierno

"Call this a govment! why, just look at it and see what it's like. Here's the law a-standing ready to take a man's son away from him"a man's own son, which he has had all the trouble and all the anxiety and all the expense of raising. Yes, just as that man has got that son raised at last, and ready to go to work and begin to do suthin'for him and give him a rest, the law up and goes for him. And they call that govment! That ain't all, nuther. The law backs that old Judge Thatcher up and helps him to keep me out o'my property. Here's what the law does: The law takes a man worth six thousand dollars and up'ards, and jams him into an old trap of a cabin like this, and lets him go round in clothes that ain't fitten for a hog.

anxiety - zozobra, ansiedad, inquietud

trap - trampa

go round - dar vueltas

They call that govment! A man can't get his rights in a govment like this. Sometimes I've a mighty notion to just leave the country for good and all. Yes, and I told 'em so; I told old Thatcher so to his face. Lots of 'em heard me, and can tell what I said. Says I, for two cents I'd leave the blamed country and never come a-near it agin. Them's the very words. I says look at my hat"if you call it a hat"but the lid raises up and the rest of it goes down till it's below my chin, and then it ain't rightly a hat at all, but more like my head was shoved up through a jint o'stove-pipe. Look at it, says I"such a hat for me to wear"one of the wealthiest men in this town if I could git my rights.

notion - noción, ganas, intención

blamed - culpado; culpar, responsabilizar, echar la culpa

chin - barbilla, mentón

rightly - verdad

shoved - empujado; empujar

stove - fogón; estufa, cocina, horno; (stave); duela, estrofa

wealthiest - los más ricos; adinerado, rico, próspero, acomodado

"Oh, yes, this is a wonderful govment, wonderful. Why, looky here. There was a free nigger there from Ohio"a mulatter, most as white as a white man. He had the whitest shirt on you ever see, too, and the shiniest hat; and there ain't a man in that town that's got as fine clothes as what he had; and he had a gold watch and chain, and a silver-headed cane"the awfulest old gray-headed nabob in the State. And what do you think? They said he was a p'fessor in a college, and could talk all kinds of languages, and knowed everything. And that ain't the wust. They said he could vote when he was at home. Well, that let me out. Thinks I, what is the country a-coming to? It was 'lection day, and I was just about to go and vote myself if I warn't too drunk to get there; but when they told me there was a State in this country where they'd let that nigger vote, I drawed out. I says I'll never vote agin. Them's the very words I said; they all heard me; and the country may rot for all me"I'll never vote agin as long as I live. And to see the cool way of that nigger"why, he wouldn't a give me the road if I hadn't shoved him out o'the way.

Ohio - Ohio

mulatter - Mulatón

shiniest - más brillante; reluciente, refulgente, brillante

chain - cadena, encadenar

cane - canón; cana, bastón, bastón blanco

awfulest - Más horrible

vote - voto, votar

lection - ección

drawed - Dibujado

rot - podredumbre; pudrir, podrir, putrefacción, podre

I says to the people, why ain't this nigger put up at auction and sold?"that's what I want to know. And what do you reckon they said? Why, they said he couldn't be sold till he'd been in the State six months, and he hadn't been there that long yet. There, now"that's a specimen. They call that a govment that can't sell a free nigger till he's been in the State six months. Here's a govment that calls itself a govment, and lets on to be a govment, and thinks it is a govment, and yet's got to set stock-still for six whole months before it can take a hold of a prowling, thieving, infernal, white-shirted free nigger, and""

auction - subasta, remate, almoneda, subastar, rematar

specimen - espécimen, ejemplar

stock-still - (stock-still) inmóvil

prowling - Merodeando; (prowl); acechar, merodear, aguaitar

thieving - Robar; (thieve); robar

infernal - infernal

Pap was agoing on so he never noticed where his old limber legs was taking him to, so he went head over heels over the tub of salt pork and barked both shins, and the rest of his speech was all the hottest kind of language"mostly hove at the nigger and the govment, though he give the tub some, too, all along, here and there. He hopped around the cabin considerable, first on one leg and then on the other, holding first one shin and then the other one, and at last he let out with his left foot all of a sudden and fetched the tub a rattling kick.

agoing - going

limber - caliente; calentar

heels - tacones; talón

tub - cuba, tina

barked - ladró; ladrido

shins - espinillas; espinilla

hopped - saltó; saltar a la pata coja

sudden - de repente; repentino, súbito, brusco

rattling - traqueteo; (rattle) traqueteo

kick - patear; dar un puntapié, golpear con el pie, dar una patada a

But it warn't good judgment, because that was the boot that had a couple of his toes leaking out of the front end of it; so now he raised a howl that fairly made a body's hair raise, and down he went in the dirt, and rolled there, and held his toes; and the cussing he done then laid over anything he had ever done previous. He said so his own self afterwards. He had heard old Sowberry Hagan in his best days, and he said it laid over him, too; but I reckon that was sort of piling it on, maybe.

judgment - juicio

leaking out - gotear; filtrarse, salir a la luz

howl - aullido, aullar, ganir

fairly - justamente; francamente, abiertamente, bastante

previous - previo, anterior

After supper pap took the jug, and said he had enough whisky there for two drunks and one delirium tremens. That was always his word. I judged he would be blind drunk in about an hour, and then I would steal the key, or saw myself out, one or t'other. He drank and drank, and tumbled down on his blankets by-and-by; but luck didn't run my way.

Drunks - borrachos; borracho, ebrio, pedo, borracho

delirium - delirio

tremens - Temblens

blind - ciego, invidente, celosía, persiana, ciega, ciego, cegar

tumbled - tumbado; caída, caer, revolverse

blankets - mantas; manta, capa, general

He didn't go sound asleep, but was uneasy. He groaned and moaned and thrashed around this way and that for a long time. At last I got so sleepy I couldn't keep my eyes open all I could do, and so before I knowed what I was about I was sound asleep, and the candle burning.

groaned - gimió; gemido, grunido, gemir, grunir

moaned - gimió; gemido, quejido, quejar, gemir

I don't know how long I was asleep, but all of a sudden there was an awful scream and I was up. There was pap looking wild, and skipping around every which way and yelling about snakes. He said they was crawling up his legs; and then he would give a jump and scream, and say one had bit him on the cheek"but I couldn't see no snakes. He started and run round and round the cabin, hollering "Take him off! take him off! he's biting me on the neck!" I never see a man look so wild in the eyes. Pretty soon he was all fagged out, and fell down panting; then he rolled over and over wonderful fast, kicking things every which way, and striking and grabbing at the air with his hands, and screaming and saying there was devils a-hold of him.

skipping - saltando; saltar

yelling - Gritando; (yell) Gritando

cheek - mejilla, cacha, cachete, nalga, glúteo, descoco

hollering - gritando; gritar

fagged - maricón; faena, lata

panting - Jadeando; (pant) Jadeando

kicking - pateando; dar un puntapié, golpear con el pie, dar una patada a

striking - sorprendente; llamativo, imponente

grabbing - agarrando; asir, agarrar, coger

screaming - gritando; grito, gritar

devils - demonios; diablo

He wore out by-and-by, and laid still a while, moaning. Then he laid stiller, and didn't make a sound. I could hear the owls and the wolves away off in the woods, and it seemed terrible still. He was laying over by the corner. By-and-by he raised up part way and listened, with his head to one side. He says, very low:

moaning - gimiendo; gemido, quejido, quejar, gemir

owls - búhos; búho, lechuza, tecolote

wolves - lobos; lobo, mujeriego, devorar, engullir

laying - colocación; (lay) colocación

"Tramp"tramp"tramp; that's the dead; tramp"tramp"tramp; they're coming after me; but I won't go. Oh, they're here! don't touch me"don't! hands off"they're cold; let go. Oh, let a poor devil alone!"

Then he went down on all fours and crawled off, begging them to let him alone, and he rolled himself up in his blanket and wallowed in under the old pine table, still a-begging; and then he went to crying. I could hear him through the blanket.

begging - Mendigando; (beg) Mendigando

wallowed - se revolcó; revolcarse

pine - pino

By-and-by he rolled out and jumped up on his feet looking wild, and he see me and went for me. He chased me round and round the place with a clasp-knife, calling me the Angel of Death, and saying he would kill me, and then I couldn't come for him no more. I begged, and told him I was only Huck; but he laughed such a screechy laugh, and roared and cussed, and kept on chasing me up. Once when I turned short and dodged under his arm he made a grab and got me by the jacket between my shoulders, and I thought I was gone; but I slid out of the jacket quick as lightning, and saved myself.

clasp-knife - (clasp-knife) navaja

angel - ángel

begged - suplicó; pedir

screechy - chirriante

roared - rugía; rugir, bramar, rugido, bramido

chasing - Persiguiendo; (chas) Persiguiendo

grab - asir, agarrar, coger

Pretty soon he was all tired out, and dropped down with his back against the door, and said he would rest a minute and then kill me. He put his knife under him, and said he would sleep and get strong, and then he would see who was who.

tired out - agotado

So he dozed off pretty soon. By-and-by I got the old split-bottom chair and clumb up as easy as I could, not to make any noise, and got down the gun. I slipped the ramrod down it to make sure it was loaded, then I laid it across the turnip barrel, pointing towards pap, and set down behind it to wait for him to stir. And how slow and still the time did drag along.

dozed - dormido; dormitar

ramrod - bastón; baqueta

stir - remover, revolver

drag - arrastrar; llevar a rastras

CHAPTER VII.

"Git up! What you 'bout?"

I opened my eyes and looked around, trying to make out where I was. It was after sun-up, and I had been sound asleep. Pap was standing over me looking sour and sick, too. He says:

sour - agrio, ácido, acedo, acidez

"What you doin'with this gun?"

doin - Haciendo

I judged he didn't know nothing about what he had been doing, so I says:

"Somebody tried to get in, so I was laying for him."

"Why didn't you roust me out?"

"Well, I tried to, but I couldn't; I couldn't budge you."

"Well, all right. Don't stand there palavering all day, but out with you and see if there's a fish on the lines for breakfast. I'll be along in a minute."

palavering - palabras; parla

He unlocked the door, and I cleared out up the river-bank. I noticed some pieces of limbs and such things floating down, and a sprinkling of bark; so I knowed the river had begun to rise. I reckoned I would have great times now if I was over at the town.

unlocked - desbloqueado; abrir, abrir con llave, desatrancar, desbloquear

cleared out - despejado

limbs - miembros; miembro

sprinkling - Rociando; (sprinkle); salpicar, rociar, asperjar, espolvorear

bark - corteza; ladrido

The June rise used to be always luck for me; because as soon as that rise begins here comes cordwood floating down, and pieces of log rafts"sometimes a dozen logs together; so all you have to do is to catch them and sell them to the wood-yards and the sawmill.

rafts - balsas; balsa

dozen - docena, decenas

sawmill - aserradero

I went along up the bank with one eye out for pap and t'other one out for what the rise might fetch along. Well, all at once here comes a canoe; just a beauty, too, about thirteen or fourteen foot long, riding high like a duck. I shot head-first off of the bank like a frog, clothes and all on, and struck out for the canoe. I just expected there'd be somebody laying down in it, because people often done that to fool folks, and when a chap had pulled a skiff out most to it they'd raise up and laugh at him. But it warn't so this time. It was a drift-canoe sure enough, and I clumb in and paddled her ashore.

canoe - canoa

beauty - belleza, hermosura, preciosidad, preciosura

Duck - pato; hundir, sumergir

head-first - (head-first) sin pensarlo, de cabeza

struck - golpeado; tachar, borrar, golpear, pegar, acunar

laying down - ponerse, acostarse, tumbarse

drift - deriva, derrape, ir a la deriva, vagar, derivar, errar

paddled - emado; chapotear, mojarse los pies

Thinks I, the old man will be glad when he sees this"she's worth ten dollars. But when I got to shore pap wasn't in sight yet, and as I was running her into a little creek like a gully, all hung over with vines and willows, I struck another idea: I judged I'd hide her good, and then, 'stead of taking to the woods when I run off, I'd go down the river about fifty mile and camp in one place for good, and not have such a rough time tramping on foot.

running her - llevar, introducir, presentar

Creek - caleta, arroyo, riachuelo

gully - barranco; torrentera; surco, cauce

hung over - resaca

willows - sauces; sauce, mimbrera, sauz

taking to - ponerse a; interesarse en

tramping - paseando; (tramp); vagabundo, vagabunda, golfa, ramera, puta

It was pretty close to the shanty, and I thought I heard the old man coming all the time; but I got her hid; and then I out and looked around a bunch of willows, and there was the old man down the path a piece just drawing a bead on a bird with his gun. So he hadn't seen anything.

shanty - chabola, barraca

bunch - manojo, punado, (flowers) ramo, bonchote, racimo, grupo

bead - perla; cuenta, gota

When he got along I was hard at it taking up a "trot" line. He abused me a little for being so slow; but I told him I fell in the river, and that was what made me so long. I knowed he would see I was wet, and then he would be asking questions. We got five catfish off the lines and went home.

got along - apartarse, irse; apanárselas, desenvolverse

trot - trotar

abused - abusado; Abuso

catfish - pez gato

While we laid off after breakfast to sleep up, both of us being about wore out, I got to thinking that if I could fix up some way to keep pap and the widow from trying to follow me, it would be a certainer thing than trusting to luck to get far enough off before they missed me; you see, all kinds of things might happen.

trusting - confiado; confianza, crédito, fiar, consorcio, trust

Well, I didn't see no way for a while, but by-and-by pap raised up a minute to drink another barrel of water, and he says:

"Another time a man comes a-prowling round here you roust me out, you hear? That man warn't here for no good. I'd a shot him. Next time you roust me out, you hear?"

Then he dropped down and went to sleep again; but what he had been saying give me the very idea I wanted. I says to myself, I can fix it now so nobody won't think of following me.

About twelve o'clock we turned out and went along up the bank. The river was coming up pretty fast, and lots of driftwood going by on the rise. By-and-by along comes part of a log raft"nine logs fast together. We went out with the skiff and towed it ashore. Then we had dinner. Anybody but pap would a waited and seen the day through, so as to catch more stuff; but that warn't pap's style. Nine logs was enough for one time; he must shove right over to town and sell.

going by - pasar

raft - balsa

towed - remolcado; remolcar

shove - empujar

So he locked me in and took the skiff, and started off towing the raft about half-past three. I judged he wouldn't come back that night. I waited till I reckoned he had got a good start; then I out with my saw, and went to work on that log again. Before he was t'other side of the river I was out of the hole; him and his raft was just a speck on the water away off yonder.

towing - remolque; (tow) remolque

speck - mancha; manchita

yonder - de allá, aquel, aquella

I took the sack of corn meal and took it to where the canoe was hid, and shoved the vines and branches apart and put it in; then I done the same with the side of bacon; then the whisky-jug. I took all the coffee and sugar there was, and all the ammunition; I took the wadding; I took the bucket and gourd; I took a dipper and a tin cup, and my old saw and two blankets, and the skillet and the coffee-pot. I took fish-lines and matches and other things"everything that was worth a cent.

apart - aparte, separadamente

bucket - cubo; balde, llover a cántaros, jarrear

gourd - calabaza, calabacino, bangana

dipper - mirlo acuático, cucharón

skillet - sartén

pot - pote, cacerola, puchero; tarro; maceta, tiesto

I cleaned out the place. I wanted an axe, but there wasn't any, only the one out at the woodpile, and I knowed why I was going to leave that. I fetched out the gun, and now I was done.

axe - hacha

I had wore the ground a good deal crawling out of the hole and dragging out so many things. So I fixed that as good as I could from the outside by scattering dust on the place, which covered up the smoothness and the sawdust. Then I fixed the piece of log back into its place, and put two rocks under it and one against it to hold it there, for it was bent up at that place and didn't quite touch ground.

dragging - arrastrando; llevar a rastras

covered up - cubierto, tapado

sawdust - serrín, aserrín

under it - debajo de

bent - Doblado; (bend); doblar, curvar, doblarse, agacharse

If you stood four or five foot away and didn't know it was sawed, you wouldn't never notice it; and besides, this was the back of the cabin, and it warn't likely anybody would go fooling around there.

sawed - Serrado

It was all grass clear to the canoe, so I hadn't left a track. I followed around to see. I stood on the bank and looked out over the river. All safe. So I took the gun and went up a piece into the woods, and was hunting around for some birds when I see a wild pig; hogs soon went wild in them bottoms after they had got away from the prairie farms. I shot this fellow and took him into camp.

hunting - Cazar; (hunt); cazar, buscar, caza

prairie - pradera

fellow - colega; tipo

I took the axe and smashed in the door. I beat it and hacked it considerable a-doing it. I fetched the pig in, and took him back nearly to the table and hacked into his throat with the axe, and laid him down on the ground to bleed; I say ground because it was ground"hard packed, and no boards. Well, next I took an old sack and put a lot of big rocks in it"all I could drag"and I started it from the pig, and dragged it to the door and through the woods down to the river and dumped it in, and down it sunk, out of sight.

smashed - aplastado; estrellar, destrozar, golpear, machucar

bleed - sangrar, desangrar, purgar, sangría, sangrado, sangre

dragged - arrastrado; llevar a rastras

dumped - dejado; dejar

sunk - Hundido; (sink); hundir, sumergir, sumergirse, lavamanos

You could easy see that something had been dragged over the ground. I did wish Tom Sawyer was there; I knowed he would take an interest in this kind of business, and throw in the fancy touches. Nobody could spread himself like Tom Sawyer in such a thing as that.

fancy - te apetece; capricho, antojo

Well, last I pulled out some of my hair, and blooded the axe good, and stuck it on the back side, and slung the axe in the corner. Then I took up the pig and held him to my breast with my jacket (so he couldn't drip) till I got a good piece below the house and then dumped him into the river. Now I thought of something else. So I went and got the bag of meal and my old saw out of the canoe, and fetched them to the house. I took the bag to where it used to stand, and ripped a hole in the bottom of it with the saw, for there warn't no knives and forks on the place"pap done everything with his clasp-knife about the cooking. Then I carried the sack about a hundred yards across the grass and through the willows east of the house, to a shallow lake that was five mile wide and full of rushes"and ducks too, you might say, in the season.

slung - colgado; cabestrillo

drip - goteo; gotear

ripped - desgarrado; rasgar, desgarrar

clasp - cierre; broche, manija, corchete, hebilla, agarrar

shallow - poco profundo, superficial, desinteresante, poco profundo (1

rushes - prisas; precipitarse, lanzarse, correr, ir rápidamente

ducks - patos; hundir, sumergir

There was a slough or a creek leading out of it on the other side that went miles away, I don't know where, but it didn't go to the river. The meal sifted out and made a little track all the way to the lake. I dropped pap's whetstone there too, so as to look like it had been done by accident. Then I tied up the rip in the meal sack with a string, so it wouldn't leak no more, and took it and my saw to the canoe again.

slough - lodos

leading - dirigiendo; (lead) dirigiendo

sifted - cribado; tamizar, cernir, separar, juzgar

whetstone - muela, piedra de afilar, piedra de amolar

rip - rasgar, desgarrar

leak - fuga; gotera, agujero, rotura, vía, pérdida, filtración, gotear

It was about dark now; so I dropped the canoe down the river under some willows that hung over the bank, and waited for the moon to rise. I made fast to a willow; then I took a bite to eat, and by-and-by laid down in the canoe to smoke a pipe and lay out a plan. I says to myself, they'll follow the track of that sackful of rocks to the shore and then drag the river for me. And they'll follow that meal track to the lake and go browsing down the creek that leads out of it to find the robbers that killed me and took the things.

willow - sauce, mimbrera, sauz

bite - morder, picar, mordida, mordedura, mordisco, picadura

smoke a pipe - fumar una pipa

sackful - Un saco

leads - llevar, conducir

They won't ever hunt the river for anything but my dead carcass. They'll soon get tired of that, and won't bother no more about me. All right; I can stop anywhere I want to. Jackson's Island is good enough for me; I know that island pretty well, and nobody ever comes there. And then I can paddle over to town nights, and slink around and pick up things I want. Jackson's Island's the place.

paddle - paletas; chapotear, mojarse los pies

I was pretty tired, and the first thing I knowed I was asleep. When I woke up I didn't know where I was for a minute. I set up and looked around, a little scared. Then I remembered. The river looked miles and miles across. The moon was so bright I could a counted the drift logs that went a-slipping along, black and still, hundreds of yards out from shore.

slipping - resbalando; resbalar

Everything was dead quiet, and it looked late, and smelt late. You know what I mean"I don't know the words to put it in.

dead quiet - Silencio absoluto

I took a good gap and a stretch, and was just going to unhitch and start when I heard a sound away over the water. I listened. Pretty soon I made it out. It was that dull kind of a regular sound that comes from oars working in rowlocks when it's a still night. I peeped out through the willow branches, and there it was"a skiff, away across the water. I couldn't tell how many was in it. It kept a-coming, and when it was abreast of me I see there warn't but one man in it.

unhitch - Desenganchar

dull - sordo; romo, desafilado, embotado, aburrido, soso

oars - remos; remo

rowlocks - rowlocks; horquilla

peeped - spiado; espiar

abreast - al día; de lado a lado, al corriente

Think's I, maybe it's pap, though I warn't expecting him. He dropped below me with the current, and by-and-by he came a-swinging up shore in the easy water, and he went by so close I could a reached out the gun and touched him. Well, it was pap, sure enough"and sober, too, by the way he laid his oars.

current - corriente, actual

swinging - Balanceándose; (swing); balancear, mecer, columpiar, oscilar

I didn't lose no time. The next minute I was a-spinning down stream soft but quick in the shade of the bank. I made two mile and a half, and then struck out a quarter of a mile or more towards the middle of the river, because pretty soon I would be passing the ferry landing, and people might see me and hail me. I got out amongst the driftwood, and then laid down in the bottom of the canoe and let her float.

spinning - girando; hilatura; (spin) girando; hilatura

stream - corriente, flujo, arroyo, fluir, recibir flujo, (2) checkcorrer

shade - sombra, persiana, umbral, tono, matiz, sombrear, matizar

hail - Granizo, granizar; llamar, saludar

float - flotador; flotar, carroza

I laid there, and had a good rest and a smoke out of my pipe, looking away into the sky; not a cloud in it. The sky looks ever so deep when you lay down on your back in the moonshine; I never knowed it before. And how far a body can hear on the water such nights! I heard people talking at the ferry landing. I heard what they said, too"every word of it. One man said it was getting towards the long days and the short nights now. T'other one said this warn't one of the short ones, he reckoned"and then they laughed, and he said it over again, and they laughed again; then they waked up another fellow and told him, and laughed, but he didn't laugh; he ripped out something brisk, and said let him alone.

looking away - Mirar para otro lado

Moonshine - bebida alcohólica; alcohol ilegal

brisk - brioso, enérgico, vital, vigorizante, brusco

The first fellow said he 'lowed to tell it to his old woman"she would think it was pretty good; but he said that warn't nothing to some things he had said in his time. I heard one man say it was nearly three o'clock, and he hoped daylight wouldn't wait more than about a week longer. After that the talk got further and further away, and I couldn't make out the words any more; but I could hear the mumble, and now and then a laugh, too, but it seemed a long ways off.

mumble - murmurar; mascullar, mascujar, susurrar, mascujada

I was away below the ferry now. I rose up, and there was Jackson's Island, about two mile and a half down stream, heavy timbered and standing up out of the middle of the river, big and dark and solid, like a steamboat without any lights. There warn't any signs of the bar at the head"it was all under water now.

timbered - amaderado; madera de construcción

steamboat - barco de vapor

It didn't take me long to get there. I shot past the head at a ripping rate, the current was so swift, and then I got into the dead water and landed on the side towards the Illinois shore. I run the canoe into a deep dent in the bank that I knowed about; I had to part the willow branches to get in; and when I made fast nobody could a seen the canoe from the outside.

swift - rápido, veloz, célere, pronto

dead water - agua muerta

Dent - abolladura

I went up and set down on a log at the head of the island, and looked out on the big river and the black driftwood and away over to the town, three mile away, where there was three or four lights twinkling. A monstrous big lumber-raft was about a mile up stream, coming along down, with a lantern in the middle of it.

lumber - madera aserrada

lantern - farol, linterna

I watched it come creeping down, and when it was most abreast of where I stood I heard a man say, "Stern oars, there! heave her head to stabboard!" I heard that just as plain as if the man was by my side.

stern - severo, austero, serio

heave - arriba; ondular

stabboard - tabla de punaladas

plain - plano; sencillo; liso; sin ornamentos; llano (persona)

There was a little gray in the sky now; so I stepped into the woods, and laid down for a nap before breakfast.

nap - siesta

CHAPTER VIII.

The sun was up so high when I waked that I judged it was after eight o'clock. I laid there in the grass and the cool shade thinking about things, and feeling rested and ruther comfortable and satisfied. I could see the sun out at one or two holes, but mostly it was big trees all about, and gloomy in there amongst them.

gloomy - lúgubre; lóbrego, sombrío

There was freckled places on the ground where the light sifted down through the leaves, and the freckled places swapped about a little, showing there was a little breeze up there. A couple of squirrels set on a limb and jabbered at me very friendly.

freckled - pecas; peca, tener peca

swapped - Intercambio

breeze - brisa

squirrels - ardillas; ardilla

jabbered - farfulló; farfullar

I was powerful lazy and comfortable"didn't want to get up and cook breakfast. Well, I was dozing off again when I thinks I hears a deep sound of "boom!" away up the river. I rouses up, and rests on my elbow and listens; pretty soon I hears it again. I hopped up, and went and looked out at a hole in the leaves, and I see a bunch of smoke laying on the water a long ways up"about abreast the ferry.

dozing - Dormir; (doze) Dormir

rouses - ouses; despertar

elbow - codo, codazo, panish: t-needed

And there was the ferry-boat full of people floating along down. I knowed what was the matter now. "Boom!" I see the white smoke squirt out of the ferry-boat's side. You see, they was firing cannon over the water, trying to make my carcass come to the top.

ferry-boat - (ferry-boat) ferry, transbordador

cannon - canón; canón

I was pretty hungry, but it warn't going to do for me to start a fire, because they might see the smoke. So I set there and watched the cannon-smoke and listened to the boom. The river was a mile wide there, and it always looks pretty on a summer morning"so I was having a good enough time seeing them hunt for my remainders if I only had a bite to eat. Well, then I happened to think how they always put quicksilver in loaves of bread and float them off, because they always go right to the drownded carcass and stop there. So, says I, I'll keep a lookout, and if any of them's floating around after me I'll give them a show.

remainders - restos; resto, remanente, sobras, restante

quicksilver - mercurio, azogue

loaves - panes; pan, barra

lookout - mirador; vigía

I changed to the Illinois edge of the island to see what luck I could have, and I warn't disappointed. A big double loaf come along, and I most got it with a long stick, but my foot slipped and she floated out further. Of course I was where the current set in the closest to the shore"I knowed enough for that. But by-and-by along comes another one, and this time I won. I took out the plug and shook out the little dab of quicksilver, and set my teeth in. It was "baker's bread""what the quality eat; none of your low-down corn-pone.

disappointed - decepcionado; decepcionar, desilusionar, defraudar, quedar mal

loaf - pan, barra

floated - flotó; flotar, carroza

plug - enchufe, tapón, tapar, promocionar

Dab - tocar ligeramente

Baker - panadero, panadera

I got a good place amongst the leaves, and set there on a log, munching the bread and watching the ferry-boat, and very well satisfied. And then something struck me. I says, now I reckon the widow or the parson or somebody prayed that this bread would find me, and here it has gone and done it.

parson - párroco, cura párroco, pastor

So there ain't no doubt but there is something in that thing"that is, there's something in it when a body like the widow or the parson prays, but it don't work for me, and I reckon it don't work for only just the right kind.

doubt - dudas; dudar, duda, incertidumbre

prays - rezar, orar

I lit a pipe and had a good long smoke, and went on watching. The ferry-boat was floating with the current, and I allowed I'd have a chance to see who was aboard when she come along, because she would come in close, where the bread did.

aboard - a bordo, a bordo de

When she'd got pretty well along down towards me, I put out my pipe and went to where I fished out the bread, and laid down behind a log on the bank in a little open place. Where the log forked I could peep through.

peep through - espiar por

By-and-by she come along, and she drifted in so close that they could a run out a plank and walked ashore. Most everybody was on the boat. Pap, and Judge Thatcher, and Bessie Thatcher, and Jo Harper, and Tom Sawyer, and his old Aunt Polly, and Sid and Mary, and plenty more. Everybody was talking about the murder, but the captain broke in and says:

drifted - deriva, derrape, ir a la deriva, vagar, derivar, errar

plank - placa; tablón, artículo, entablar

"Look sharp, now; the current sets in the closest here, and maybe he's washed ashore and got tangled amongst the brush at the water's edge. I hope so, anyway."

Look sharp - darse prisa; estar elegante

I didn't hope so. They all crowded up and leaned over the rails, nearly in my face, and kept still, watching with all their might. I could see them first-rate, but they couldn't see me. Then the captain sung out:

rails - rieles; barra

first-rate - (first-rate) de primera clase

"Stand away!" and the cannon let off such a blast right before me that it made me deef with the noise and pretty near blind with the smoke, and I judged I was gone. If they'd a had some bullets in, I reckon they'd a got the corpse they was after. Well, I see I warn't hurt, thanks to goodness. The boat floated on and went out of sight around the shoulder of the island. I could hear the booming now and then, further and further off, and by-and-by, after an hour, I didn't hear it no more.

let off - dejar ir; dejar libre; perdonar, no castigar

blast - ráfaga

deef - Def

bullets - balas; bala

corpse - cuerpo, cadáver

goodness - bondad

booming - en auge; (boom) en auge

The island was three mile long. I judged they had got to the foot, and was giving it up. But they didn't yet a while. They turned around the foot of the island and started up the channel on the Missouri side, under steam, and booming once in a while as they went. I crossed over to that side and watched them. When they got abreast the head of the island they quit shooting and dropped over to the Missouri shore and went home to the town.

started up - arrancado, abierto (un negocio)

Channel - canal

steam - Vapor; vaporear; de vapor; al vapor

shooting - disparando; tiroteo, tiro; (shoot) disparando; tiroteo, tiro

I knowed I was all right now. Nobody else would come a-hunting after me. I got my traps out of the canoe and made me a nice camp in the thick woods. I made a kind of a tent out of my blankets to put my things under so the rain couldn't get at them. I catched a catfish and haggled him open with my saw, and towards sundown I started my camp fire and had supper. Then I set out a line to catch some fish for breakfast.

traps - trampas; trampa

tent - tienda (de campana)

haggled - regateó; regatear, detener en pequeneces

sundown - Puesta de sol

When it was dark I set by my camp fire smoking, and feeling pretty well satisfied; but by-and-by it got sort of lonesome, and so I went and set on the bank and listened to the current swashing along, and counted the stars and drift logs and rafts that come down, and then went to bed; there ain't no better way to put in time when you are lonesome; you can't stay so, you soon get over it.

swashing - Golpeando; (swash) Golpeando

And so for three days and nights. No difference"just the same thing. But the next day I went exploring around down through the island. I was boss of it; it all belonged to me, so to say, and I wanted to know all about it; but mainly I wanted to put in the time. I found plenty strawberries, ripe and prime; and green summer grapes, and green razberries; and the green blackberries was just beginning to show.

exploring - explorando; explorar

strawberries - fresas; fresa, frutilla

ripe - maduro

prime - primer, primero

grapes - uvas; uva

blackberries - moras; zarza, zarzamora

They would all come handy by-and-by, I judged.

Well, I went fooling along in the deep woods till I judged I warn't far from the foot of the island. I had my gun along, but I hadn't shot nothing; it was for protection; thought I would kill some game nigh home. About this time I mighty near stepped on a good-sized snake, and it went sliding off through the grass and flowers, and I after it, trying to get a shot at it.

protection - protección

nigh - cerca, cabe, cercano

sliding - deslizándose; corredizo; (slid) deslizándose; corredizo

I clipped along, and all of a sudden I bounded right on to the ashes of a camp fire that was still smoking.

clipped - cortado; cortar

bounded - atado

My heart jumped up amongst my lungs. I never waited for to look further, but uncocked my gun and went sneaking back on my tiptoes as fast as ever I could. Every now and then I stopped a second amongst the thick leaves and listened, but my breath come so hard I couldn't hear nothing else.

lungs - pulmones; pulmón

uncocked - Desatascar

sneaking - a escondidas; pillo, moverse con sigilo, esconder, escabullir

Tiptoes - punta del pie, caminar de puntillas

I slunk along another piece further, then listened again; and so on, and so on. If I see a stump, I took it for a man; if I trod on a stick and broke it, it made me feel like a person had cut one of my breaths in two and I only got half, and the short half, too.

stump - tocón, tueco, estaca, poste

breaths - respiración, aliento, respiro

When I got to camp I warn't feeling very brash, there warn't much sand in my craw; but I says, this ain't no time to be fooling around. So I got all my traps into my canoe again so as to have them out of sight, and I put out the fire and scattered the ashes around to look like an old last year's camp, and then clumb a tree.

brash - descarado, impertinente, presuntuoso

sand - arena

I reckon I was up in the tree two hours; but I didn't see nothing, I didn't hear nothing"I only thought I heard and seen as much as a thousand things. Well, I couldn't stay up there forever; so at last I got down, but I kept in the thick woods and on the lookout all the time. All I could get to eat was berries and what was left over from breakfast.

berries - bayas; baya

"We better camp here if we can find a good place; the horses is about beat out. Let's look around."

I didn't wait, but shoved out and paddled away easy. I tied up in the old place, and reckoned I would sleep in the canoe.

I didn't sleep much. I couldn't, somehow, for thinking. And every time I waked up I thought somebody had me by the neck. So the sleep didn't do me no good. By-and-by I says to myself, I can't live this way; I'm a-going to find out who it is that's here on the island with me; I'll find it out or bust. Well, I felt better right off.

So I took my paddle and slid out from shore just a step or two, and then let the canoe drop along down amongst the shadows. The moon was shining, and outside of the shadows it made it most as light as day. I poked along well on to an hour, everything still as rocks and sound asleep. Well, by this time I was most down to the foot of the island. A little ripply, cool breeze begun to blow, and that was as good as saying the night was about done. I give her a turn with the paddle and brung her nose to shore; then I got my gun and slipped out and into the edge of the woods. I sat down there on a log, and looked out through the leaves. I see the moon go off watch, and the darkness begin to blanket the river. But in a little while I see a pale streak over the treetops, and knowed the day was coming. So I took my gun and slipped off towards where I had run across that camp fire, stopping every minute or two to listen. But I hadn't no luck somehow; I couldn't seem to find the place.

shadows - sombras; sombra

shining - brillante; espinilla

ripply - ipply

brung - Trajiste

darkness - oscuridad, tinieblas

pale - pálido

streak - raya, trazo, sarta, racha, ristra

treetops - las copas de los árboles; copa

slipped off - salir a escondidas; quitarse; descalzarse

But by-and-by, sure enough, I catched a glimpse of Fire away through the trees. I went for it, cautious and slow. By-and-by I was close enough to have a look, and there laid a man on the ground. It most give me the fan-tods. He had a blanket around his head, and his head was nearly in the fire. I set there behind a clump of bushes, in about six foot of him, and kept my eyes on him steady. It was getting gray daylight now. Pretty soon he gapped and stretched himself and hove off the blanket, and it was Miss Watson's Jim! I bet I was glad to see him. I says:

Glimpse - un vistazo; atisbo, entrever, atisbar, vislumbrar, ojear

Fire away - Disparar

cautious - cauto, cauteloso, precavido, cuidadoso

clump - montón; grumo, matorral, mechón, plop, amontonar, marchar

bushes - arbustos; arbusto

steady - estable; firme, liso, fijo

"Hello, Jim!" and skipped out.

He bounced up and stared at me wild. Then he drops down on his knees, and puts his hands together and says:

bounced - rebotó; rebotar, rebote

"Doan'hurt me"don't! I hain't ever done no harm to a ghos'. I alwuz liked dead people, en done all I could for 'em. You go en git in de river agin, whah you b'longs, en doan'do nuffn to Ole Jim, 'at 'uz awluz yo'fren'."

whah - Qué

awluz - wluz

Well, I warn't long making him understand I warn't dead. I was ever so glad to see Jim. I warn't lonesome now. I told him I warn't afraid of him telling the people where I was. I talked along, but he only set there and looked at me; never said nothing. Then I says:

"It's good daylight. Le's get breakfast. Make up your camp fire good."

"What's de use er makin'up de camp fire to cook strawbries en sich truck? But you got a gun, hain't you? Den we kin git sumfn better den strawbries."

er - r; em

makin - Haciendo

strawbries - Fresas

sich - ich

"Strawberries and such truck," I says. "Is that what you live on?"

"I couldn'git nuffn else," he says.

"Why, how long you been on the island, Jim?"

"I come heah de night arter you's killed."

heah - Sí

"What, all that time?"

"Yes"indeedy."

indeedy - En serio

"And ain't you had nothing but that kind of rubbage to eat?"

rubbage - Basura

"No, sah"nuffn else."

"Well, you must be most starved, ain't you?"

starved - muerto de hambre; morir de hambre, hambrear

"I reck'n I could eat a hoss. I think I could. How long you ben on de islan'?"

"Since the night I got killed."

"No! W'y, what has you lived on? But you got a gun. Oh, yes, you got a gun. Dat's good. Now you kill sumfn en I'll make up de fire."

So we went over to where the canoe was, and while he built a fire in a grassy open place amongst the trees, I fetched meal and bacon and coffee, and coffee-pot and frying-pan, and sugar and tin cups, and the nigger was set back considerable, because he reckoned it was all done with witchcraft. I catched a good big catfish, too, and Jim cleaned him with his knife, and fried him.

grassy - hierba; herboso

frying-pan - (frying-pan) una sartén

set back - posponer, aplazar

witchcraft - brujería

fried - frito; freír

When breakfast was ready we lolled on the grass and eat it smoking hot. Jim laid it in with all his might, for he was most about starved. Then when we had got pretty well stuffed, we laid off and lazied. By-and-by Jim says:

lolled - acostado; recostarse, arrellanarse, repanchingarse

stuffed - relleno; cosas, bártulos, cosa, coso, materia, atiborrar

"But looky here, Huck, who wuz it dat 'uz killed in dat shanty ef it warn't you?"

wuz - Qué

Then I told him the whole thing, and he said it was smart. He said Tom Sawyer couldn't get up no better plan than what I had. Then I says:

smart - inteligente; elegante

"How do you come to be here, Jim, and how'd you get here?"

He looked pretty uneasy, and didn't say nothing for a minute. Then he says:

"Maybe I better not tell."

"Why, Jim?"

"Well, dey's reasons. But you wouldn'tell on me ef I uz to tell you, would you, Huck?"

"Blamed if I would, Jim."

"Well, I b'lieve you, Huck. I"I run off."

lieve - Creer

"Jim!"

"But mind, you said you wouldn'tell"you know you said you wouldn'tell, Huck."

"Well, I did. I said I wouldn't, and I'll stick to it. Honest injun, I will. People would call me a low-down Abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum"but that don't make no difference. I ain't a-going to tell, and I ain't a-going back there, anyways. So, now, le's know all about it."

honest - honesto, sincero; (hon); honesto, sincero

Abolitionist - abolicionista

despise - despreciar; desdenar

"Well, you see, it 'uz dis way. Ole missus"dat's Miss Watson"she pecks on me all de time, en treats me pooty rough, but she awluz said she wouldn'sell me down to Orleans. But I noticed dey wuz a nigger trader roun'de place considable lately, en I begin to git oneasy. Well, one night I creeps to de do'pooty late, en de do'warn't quite shet, en I hear old missus tell de widder she gwyne to sell me down to Orleans, but she didn'want to, but she could git eight hund'd dollars for me, en it 'uz sich a big stack o'money she couldn'resis'.

Missus - senora; Senora

pecks - picos; picotear

treats - golosinas; tratar, negociar, rogar, invitar, convidar, sorpresa

trader - comerciante; (trade); comercio, gremio, compraventa, comerciar

lately - últimamente

oneasy - Fácil

creeps - asquerosos; reptar, hormigueo, fatiga

shet - Qué

widder - viudo

stack - pila, montón, apilar

De widder she try to git her to say she wouldn'do it, but I never waited to hear de res'. I lit out mighty quick, I tell you.

"I tuck out en shin down de hill, en 'spec to steal a skift 'long de sho'som'ers 'bove de town, but dey wuz people a-stirring yit, so I hid in de ole tumble-down cooper-shop on de bank to wait for everybody to go 'way. Well, I wuz dah all night. Dey wuz somebody roun'all de time. 'Long 'bout six in de mawnin'skifts begin to go by, en 'bout eight er nine every skift dat went 'long wuz talkin''bout how yo'pap come over to de town en say you's killed.

shin - espinilla

ers - rs; (Er) rs

bove - ove

tumble - dar la vuelta; caída, caer, revolverse

skifts - vagabundos

talkin - hablando

Dese las'skifts wuz full o'ladies en genlmen a-goin'over for to see de place. Sometimes dey'd pull up at de sho'en take a res'b'fo'dey started acrost, so by de talk I got to know all 'bout de killin'. I 'uz powerful sorry you's killed, Huck, but I ain't no mo'now.

dese - Desea

goin - Te vas

acrost - crost

killin - Matando

"I laid dah under de shavin's all day.

I 'uz hungry, but I warn't afeard; bekase I knowed ole missus en de widder wuz goin'to start to de camp-meet'n'right arter breakfas'en be gone all day, en dey knows I goes off wid de cattle 'bout daylight, so dey wouldn''spec to see me roun'de place, en so dey wouldn'miss me tell arter dark in de evenin'. De yuther servants wouldn'miss me, kase dey'd shin out en take holiday soon as de ole folks 'uz out'n de way.

breakfas - Desayunos

evenin - Por la noche

servants - sirvientes; sirviente, criado, mozo, doméstico

"Well, when it come dark I tuck out up de river road, en went 'bout two mile er more to whah dey warn't no houses. I'd made up my mine 'bout what I's agwyne to do. You see, ef I kep'on tryin'to git away afoot, de dogs 'ud track me; ef I stole a skift to cross over, dey'd miss dat skift, you see, en dey'd know 'bout whah I'd lan'on de yuther side, en whah to pick up my track. So I says, a raff is what I's arter; it doan'make no track.

tryin - Intentándolo

afoot - a pie, andando, en curso, en pie, de pie, en marcha

cross over - cruzar

lan - Ian

"I see a light a-comin'roun'de p'int bymeby, so I wade'in en shove'a log ahead o'me en swum more'n half way acrost de river, en got in 'mongst de drift-wood, en kep'my head down low, en kinder swum agin de current tell de raff come along. Den I swum to de stern uv it en tuck a-holt. It clouded up en 'uz pooty dark for a little while. So I clumb up en laid down on de planks.

comin - Vienes

bymeby - Por qué

wade - caminar por el agua

planks - placas; tablón, artículo, entablar

De men 'uz all 'way yonder in de middle, whah de lantern wuz. De river wuz a-risin', en dey wuz a good current; so I reck'n'd 'at by fo'in de mawnin'I'd be twenty-five mile down de river, en den I'd slip in jis b'fo'daylight en swim asho', en take to de woods on de Illinois side.

risin - isin

slip - resbalón; resbalar

"But I didn'have no luck. When we 'uz mos'down to de head er de islan'a man begin to come aft wid de lantern, I see it warn't no use fer to wait, so I slid overboard en struck out fer de islan'. Well, I had a notion I could lan'mos'anywhers, but I couldn't"bank too bluff.

aft - De popa

anywhers - alguien más

bluff - un farol; directo

I 'uz mos'to de foot er de islan'b'fo'I found'a good place. I went into de woods en jedged I wouldn'fool wid raffs no mo', long as dey move de lantern roun'so. I had my pipe en a plug er dog-leg, en some matches in my cap, en dey warn't wet, so I 'uz all right."

cap - gorra

"And so you ain't had no meat nor bread to eat all this time? Why didn't you get mud-turkles?"

"How you gwyne to git 'm? You can't slip up on um en grab um; en how's a body gwyne to hit um wid a rock? How could a body do it in de night? En I warn't gwyne to show mysef on de bank in de daytime."

daytime - durante el día; día

"Well, that's so. You've had to keep in the woods all the time, of course. Did you hear 'em shooting the cannon?"

"Oh, yes. I knowed dey was arter you. I see um go by heah"watched um thoo de bushes."

thoo - Too

Some young birds come along, flying a yard or two at a time and lighting. Jim said it was a sign it was going to rain. He said it was a sign when young chickens flew that way, and so he reckoned it was the same way when young birds done it.

I was going to catch some of them, but Jim wouldn't let me. He said it was death. He said his father laid mighty sick once, and some of them catched a bird, and his old granny said his father would die, and he did.

granny - abuelita

And Jim said you mustn't count the things you are going to cook for dinner, because that would bring bad luck. The same if you shook the table-cloth after sundown. And he said if a man owned a beehive and that man died, the bees must be told about it before sun-up next morning, or else the bees would all weaken down and quit work and die.

table-cloth - (table-cloth) mantel de mesa

beehive - colmena, beehive

bees - abejas; abeja

weaken - debilitar, languir, debilitarse, languecer, languidecer

Jim said bees wouldn't sting idiots; but I didn't believe that, because I had tried them lots of times myself, and they wouldn't sting me.

sting - picar; aguijón

Idiots - idiotas; idiota

I had heard about some of these things before, but not all of them. Jim knowed all kinds of signs. He said he knowed most everything. I said it looked to me like all the signs was about bad luck, and so I asked him if there warn't any good-luck signs. He says:

"Mighty few"an'dey ain't no use to a body. What you want to know when good luck's a-comin'for? Want to keep it off?" And he said: "Ef you's got hairy arms en a hairy breas', it's a sign dat you's agwyne to be rich. Well, dey's some use in a sign like dat, 'kase it's so fur ahead.

hairy - peludo, velludo, lanudo

fur - pelo, pelaje

You see, maybe you's got to be po'a long time fust, en so you might git discourage'en kill yo'sef 'f you didn'know by de sign dat you gwyne to be rich bymeby."

discourage - descorazonar, acobardar, desalentar, persuadir, disuadir

sef - Sí

"Have you got hairy arms and a hairy breast, Jim?"

"What's de use to ax dat question? Don't you see I has?"

ax - Hacha

"Well, are you rich?"

"No, but I ben rich wunst, and gwyne to be rich agin. Wunst I had foteen dollars, but I tuck to specalat'n', en got busted out."

"What did you speculate in, Jim?"

"Well, fust I tackled stock."

tackled - bordado; equipo, aparejo, entrada, tacleada, placaje, afrontar

"What kind of stock?"

"Why, live stock"cattle, you know. I put ten dollars in a cow. But I ain'gwyne to resk no mo'money in stock. De cow up 'n'died on my han's."

live stock - Ganado (animales)

"So you lost the ten dollars."

"No, I didn't lose it all. I on'y los''bout nine of it. I sole de hide en taller for a dollar en ten cents."

sole - suela; planta

"You had five dollars and ten cents left. Did you speculate any more?"

"Yes. You know that one-laigged nigger dat b'longs to old Misto Bradish? Well, he sot up a bank, en say anybody dat put in a dollar would git fo'dollars mo'at de en'er de year. Well, all de niggers went in, but dey didn't have much. I wuz de on'y one dat had much.

sot - tomador, borracho, bebedor

So I stuck out for mo'dan fo'dollars, en I said 'f I didn'git it I'd start a bank mysef. Well, o'course dat nigger want'to keep me out er de business, bekase he says dey warn't business 'nough for two banks, so he say I could put in my five dollars en he pay me thirty-five at de en'er de year.

stuck out - sacar, sobresalir, destacar, aguantarse

nough - Suficiente

"So I done it. Den I reck'n'd I'd inves'de thirty-five dollars right off en keep things a-movin'. Dey wuz a nigger name'Bob, dat had ketched a wood-flat, en his marster didn'know it; en I bought it off'n him en told him to take de thirty-five dollars when de en'er de year come; but somebody stole de wood-flat dat night, en nex day de one-laigged nigger say de bank's busted. So dey didn'none uv us git no money."

inves - nves

movin - Te mueves

Bob - Beto

"What did you do with the ten cents, Jim?"

"Well, I 'uz gwyne to spen'it, but I had a dream, en de dream tole me to give it to a nigger name'Balum"Balum's Ass dey call him for short; he's one er dem chuckleheads, you know. But he's lucky, dey say, en I see I warn't lucky. De dream say let Balum inves'de ten cents en he'd make a raise for me.

spen - Gastar

ass - culo; asno, burro

chuckleheads - Cabeza de chorlito

Well, Balum he tuck de money, en when he wuz in church he hear de preacher say dat whoever give to de po'len'to de Lord, en boun'to git his money back a hund'd times. So Balum he tuck en give de ten cents to de po', en laid low to see what wuz gwyne to come of it."

preacher - predicador

Lord - senor; castellano, senor

"Well, what did come of it, Jim?"

"Nuffn never come of it. I couldn'manage to k'leck dat money no way; en Balum he couldn'. I ain'gwyne to len'no mo'money 'dout I see de security. Boun'to git yo'money back a hund'd times, de preacher says! Ef I could git de ten cents back, I'd call it squah, en be glad er de chanst."

Security - seguridad, confianza, garantía, prenda

squah - quah

"Well, it's all right anyway, Jim, long as you're going to be rich again some time or other."

"Yes; en I's rich now, come to look at it. I owns mysef, en I's wuth eight hund'd dollars. I wisht I had de money, I wouldn'want no mo'."

wuth - Qué

wisht - desea

CHAPTER IX.

I wanted to go and look at a place right about the middle of the island that I'd found when I was exploring; so we started and soon got to it, because the island was only three miles long and a quarter of a mile wide.

This place was a tolerable long, steep hill or ridge about forty foot high. We had a rough time getting to the top, the sides was so steep and the bushes so thick. We tramped and clumb around all over it, and by-and-by found a good big cavern in the rock, most up to the top on the side towards Illinois.

ridge - cresta, arista, cumbrera, caballete, cordillera, sierra, dorsal

tramped - trampeado; vagabundo, vagabunda, golfa, ramera, puta

cavern - caverna

The cavern was as big as two or three rooms bunched together, and Jim could stand up straight in it. It was cool in there. Jim was for putting our traps in there right away, but I said we didn't want to be climbing up and down there all the time.

bunched - agrupados; manojo, punado, (flowers) ramo, bonchote, racimo

climbing up - subiendo

Jim said if we had the canoe hid in a good place, and had all the traps in the cavern, we could rush there if anybody was to come to the island, and they would never find us without dogs. And, besides, he said them little birds had said it was going to rain, and did I want the things to get wet?

rush - prisa; precipitarse, lanzarse, correr, ir rápidamente

So we went back and got the canoe, and paddled up abreast the cavern, and lugged all the traps up there. Then we hunted up a place close by to hide the canoe in, amongst the thick willows. We took some fish off of the lines and set them again, and begun to get ready for dinner.

lugged - llevado; arrastrar

The door of the cavern was big enough to roll a hogshead in, and on one side of the door the floor stuck out a little bit, and was flat and a good place to build a fire on. So we built it there and cooked dinner.

roll - rodar; rollo

We spread the blankets inside for a carpet, and eat our dinner in there. We put all the other things handy at the back of the cavern. Pretty soon it darkened up, and begun to thunder and lighten; so the birds was right about it. Directly it begun to rain, and it rained like all fury, too, and I never see the wind blow so. It was one of these regular summer storms.

darkened - oscurecido; oscurecer, obscurecer

lighten - Aligerar

fury - furia

It would get so dark that it looked all blue-black outside, and lovely; and the rain would thrash along by so thick that the trees off a little ways looked dim and spider-webby; and here would come a blast of wind that would bend the trees down and turn up the pale underside of the leaves; and then a perfect ripper of a gust would follow along and set the branches to tossing their arms as if they was just wild; and next, when it was just about the bluest and blackest"fst! it was as bright as glory, and you'd have a little glimpse of tree-tops a-plunging about away off yonder in the storm, hundreds of yards further than you could see before; dark as sin again in a second, and now you'd hear the thunder let go with an awful crash, and then go rumbling, grumbling, tumbling, down the sky towards the under side of the world, like rolling empty barrels down stairs"where it's long stairs and they bounce a good deal, you know.

thrash - vapulear

dim - débil, ténue

bend - doblar, curvar, doblarse, agacharse, inclinarse, doblegar

ripper - Destripador; (rip) Destripador

gust - ráfaga, racha

tossing - Tirar; (toss); tiro, lanzamiento, lanzar una moneda al aire

glory - gloria

plunging - en picado; (plunge) en picado

crash - chocar; estruendo, estrépito

grumbling - refunfunando; (grumble); refunfunar, rezongar

tumbling - Dar volteretas; (tumble); caída, caer, revolverse

barrels - barriles; barril, tonel, canón, cano, embarrilar

bounce - rebotar, rebote

"Jim, this is nice," I says. "I wouldn't want to be nowhere else but here. Pass me along another hunk of fish and some hot corn-bread."

hunk - chulo; pedazo, trozo

"Well, you wouldn't a ben here 'f it hadn't a ben for Jim. You'd a ben down dah in de woods widout any dinner, en gittn'mos'drownded, too; dat you would, honey. Chickens knows when it's gwyne to rain, en so do de birds, chile."

honey - carino; miel, dulzura, carino, tesoro, cielo

Chile - Chile

The river went on raising and raising for ten or twelve days, till at last it was over the banks. The water was three or four foot deep on the island in the low places and on the Illinois bottom. On that side it was a good many miles wide, but on the Missouri side it was the same old distance across"a half a mile"because the Missouri shore was just a wall of high bluffs.

Bluffs - bluffs; directo

Daytimes we paddled all over the island in the canoe, It was mighty cool and shady in the deep woods, even if the sun was blazing outside.

Daytimes - de día; día

shady - sombra; umbroso, umbrío, turbio, sórdido

We went winding in and out amongst the trees, and sometimes the vines hung so thick we had to back away and go some other way. Well, on every old broken-down tree you could see rabbits and snakes and such things; and when the island had been overflowed a day or two they got so tame, on account of being hungry, that you could paddle right up and put your hand on them if you wanted to; but not the snakes and turtles"they would slide off in the water. The ridge our cavern was in was full of them. We could a had pets enough if we'd wanted them.

winding - Devanado; (wind) Devanado

rabbits - conejos; conejo

overflowed - se desbordó; desbordamiento, aliviadero, escape, rebosar

tame - dócil; domesticado; doméstico

turtles - tortugas; tortuga marina

One night we catched a little section of a lumber raft"nice pine planks. It was twelve foot wide and about fifteen or sixteen foot long, and the top stood above water six or seven inches"a solid, level floor. We could see saw-logs go by in the daylight sometimes, but we let them go; we didn't show ourselves in daylight.

inches - pulgadas; pulgada

Another night when we was up at the head of the island, just before daylight, here comes a frame-house down, on the west side. She was a two-story, and tilted over considerable. We paddled out and got aboard"clumb in at an upstairs window. But it was too dark to see yet, so we made the canoe fast and set in her to wait for daylight.

frame - arco; levantar la estructura, armar, enmarcar, concebir

The light begun to come before we got to the foot of the island. Then we looked in at the window. We could make out a bed, and a table, and two old chairs, and lots of things around about on the floor, and there was clothes hanging against the wall. There was something laying on the floor in the far corner that looked like a man. So Jim says:

"Hello, you!"

But it didn't budge. So I hollered again, and then Jim says:

"De man ain't asleep"he's dead. You hold still"I'll go en see."

He went, and bent down and looked, and says:

"It's a dead man. Yes, indeedy; naked, too. He's ben shot in de back. I reck'n he's ben dead two er three days. Come in, Huck, but doan'look at his face"it's too gashly."

naked - desnudo

gashly - Graciosamente

I didn't look at him at all. Jim throwed some old rags over him, but he needn't done it; I didn't want to see him. There was heaps of old greasy cards scattered around over the floor, and old whisky bottles, and a couple of masks made out of black cloth; and all over the walls was the ignorantest kind of words and pictures made with charcoal. There was two old dirty calico dresses, and a sun-bonnet, and some women's underclothes hanging against the wall, and some men's clothing, too. We put the lot into the canoe"it might come good.

throwed - Tirado

needn - necesita

heaps - montones; pila, montón, cúmulo, montículo, checkpila, amontonar

ignorantest - El más ignorante

charcoal - carbón, carbón vegetal, carboncillo

calico - calicó, gato calicó

bonnet - capucha, gorra, cofia, capota, capó

underclothes - Ropa interior

There was a boy's old speckled straw hat on the floor; I took that, too. And there was a bottle that had had milk in it, and it had a rag stopper for a baby to suck. We would a took the bottle, but it was broke. There was a seedy old chest, and an old hair trunk with the hinges broke. They stood open, but there warn't nothing left in them that was any account. The way things was scattered about we reckoned the people left in a hurry, and warn't fixed so as to carry off most of their stuff.

straw hat - un sombrero de paja

suck - chupar, sorber, ser un asco, dar asco, apestar

seedy - sórdido; semilloso, desacreditado, mala fama

chest - pecho

trunk - tronco, baúl, trompa

hinges - bisagras; bisagra, gozne, charnela, quicio, abisagrar, depender

stood open - estar abierto

hurry - prisa, apuro, apresurarse, apurarse, darse prisa

carry off - conseguir

We got an old tin lantern, and a butcher-knife without any handle, and a bran-new Barlow knife worth two bits in any store, and a lot of tallow candles, and a tin candlestick, and a gourd, and a tin cup, and a ratty old bedquilt off the bed, and a reticule with needles and pins and beeswax and buttons and thread and all such truck in it, and a hatchet and some nails, and a fishline as thick as my little finger with some monstrous hooks on it, and a roll of buckskin, and a leather dog-collar, and a horseshoe, and some vials of medicine that didn't have no label on them; and just as we was leaving I found a tolerable good curry-comb, and Jim he found a ratty old fiddle-bow, and a wooden leg.

butcher - carnicero; (butch) carnicero

bran - salvado, acemite

tallow candles - Velas de sebo

candlestick - vela; candelero, candelabro

ratty - Ratita

bedquilt - cama acolchada

needles - agujas; aguja, acícula

pins - pasadores; alfiler

beeswax - cera de abejas; cera de abeja

hatchet - hacha

fishline - Línea de pesca

buckskin - piel de gamo; ante, piel de ante

leather - piel; cuero

collar - cuello, collar, yugo

vials - frascos; frasco

label - etiqueta, rótulo, panish: t-needed

The straps was broke off of it, but, barring that, it was a good enough leg, though it was too long for me and not long enough for Jim, and we couldn't find the other one, though we hunted all around.

straps - correas; correa, cincha, tirante

And so, take it all around, we made a good haul. When we was ready to shove off we was a quarter of a mile below the island, and it was pretty broad day; so I made Jim lay down in the canoe and cover up with the quilt, because if he set up people could tell he was a nigger a good ways off.

haul - empujar, tirar fuerte, llevar

quilt - colcha, edredón, acolchar

I paddled over to the Illinois shore, and drifted down most a half a mile doing it. I crept up the dead water under the bank, and hadn't no accidents and didn't see nobody. We got home all safe.

CHAPTER X.

After breakfast I wanted to talk about the dead man and guess out how he come to be killed, but Jim didn't want to. He said it would fetch bad luck; and besides, he said, he might come and ha'nt us; he said a man that warn't buried was more likely to go a-ha'nting around than one that was planted and comfortable.

ha - Ja

nting - ting

That sounded pretty reasonable, so I didn't say no more; but I couldn't keep from studying over it and wishing I knowed who shot the man, and what they done it for.

reasonable - razonable, módico

We rummaged the clothes we'd got, and found eight dollars in silver sewed up in the lining of an old blanket overcoat. Jim said he reckoned the people in that house stole the coat, because if they'd a knowed the money was there they wouldn't a left it. I said I reckoned they killed him, too; but Jim didn't want to talk about that. I says:

rummaged - rebuscado; revolver

sewed - cosido; coser

overcoat - un abrigo; abrigo

"Now you think it's bad luck; but what did you say when I fetched in the snake-skin that I found on the top of the ridge day before yesterday? You said it was the worst bad luck in the world to touch a snake-skin with my hands. Well, here's your bad luck! We've raked in all this truck and eight dollars besides. I wish we could have some bad luck like this every day, Jim."

raked - rastrillado; rastrillo

"Never you mind, honey, never you mind. Don't you git too peart. It's a-comin'. Mind I tell you, it's a-comin'."

peart - Pert

It did come, too. It was a Tuesday that we had that talk. Well, after dinner Friday we was laying around in the grass at the upper end of the ridge, and got out of tobacco. I went to the cavern to get some, and found a rattlesnake in there. I killed him, and curled him up on the foot of Jim's blanket, ever so natural, thinking there'd be some fun when Jim found him there.

tobacco - tabaco

rattlesnake - serpiente de cascabel

curled - rizado; rizo, bucle, flexión

Well, by night I forgot all about the snake, and when Jim flung himself down on the blanket while I struck a light the snake's mate was there, and bit him.

by night - de noche

flung - arrojado; arrojar, lanzar

mate - colega; aparear, acoplar

He jumped up yelling, and the first thing the light showed was the varmint curled up and ready for another spring. I laid him out in a second with a stick, and Jim grabbed pap's whisky-jug and begun to pour it down.

grabbed - agarrado; asir, agarrar, coger

pour - verter, derramar; chorrear; manar, salir

Jim sucked and sucked at the jug, and now and then he got out of his head and pitched around and yelled; but every time he come to himself he went to sucking at the jug again. His foot swelled up pretty big, and so did his leg; but by-and-by the drunk begun to come, and so I judged he was all right; but I'd druther been bit with a snake than pap's whisky.

sucked - hupado; chupar, sorber, ser un asco, dar asco, apestar

pitched - pitched; plantar, armar, montar

yelled - gritó; grito, alarido

swelled - hinchado; hinchar(se), inflar(se)

Jim was laid up for four days and nights. Then the swelling was all gone and he was around again. I made up my mind I wouldn't ever take a-holt of a snake-skin again with my hands, now that I see what had come of it. Jim said he reckoned I would believe him next time. And he said that handling a snake-skin was such awful bad luck that maybe we hadn't got to the end of it yet. He said he druther see the new moon over his left shoulder as much as a thousand times than take up a snake-skin in his hand. Well, I was getting to feel that way myself, though I've always reckoned that looking at the new moon over your left shoulder is one of the carelessest and foolishest things a body can do.

handling - manipulación; (handle) manipulación

new moon - luna nueva

carelessest - el más descuidado

foolishest - más tonto; tonto, necio, imprudente

Old Hank Bunker done it once, and bragged about it; and in less than two years he got drunk and fell off of the shot-tower, and spread himself out so that he was just a kind of a layer, as you may say; and they slid him edgeways between two barn doors for a coffin, and buried him so, so they say, but I didn't see it. Pap told me. But anyway it all come of looking at the moon that way, like a fool.

hank - ank.; madeja

bunker - búnker

bragged - se jactó; fanfarronear, presumir, jactarse, echarse flores

layer - Capa; (lay) Capa

edgeways - al borde; de lado

barn - granero

coffin - ataúd, féretro, cajón

Well, the days went along, and the river went down between its banks again; and about the first thing we done was to bait one of the big hooks with a skinned rabbit and set it and catch a catfish that was as big as a man, being six foot two inches long, and weighed over two hundred pounds. We couldn't handle him, of course; he would a flung us into Illinois. We just set there and watched him rip and tear around till he drownded. We found a brass button in his stomach and a round ball, and lots of rubbage.

bait - cebo, carnada, carnaza

rabbit - conejo

weighed - pesado; pesar, levar, desancorar

We split the ball open with the hatchet, and there was a spool in it. Jim said he'd had it there a long time, to coat it over so and make a ball of it. It was as big a fish as was ever catched in the Mississippi, I reckon. Jim said he hadn't ever seen a bigger one. He would a been worth a good deal over at the village. They peddle out such a fish as that by the pound in the market-house there; everybody buys some of him; his meat's as white as snow and makes a good fry.

spool in - bobina, carrete en

peddle - pedalear; traficar

fry - freír

Next morning I said it was getting slow and dull, and I wanted to get a stirring up some way. I said I reckoned I would slip over the river and find out what was going on. Jim liked that notion; but he said I must go in the dark and look sharp. Then he studied it over and said, couldn't I put on some of them old things and dress up like a girl? That was a good notion, too. So we shortened up one of the calico gowns, and I turned up my trouser-legs to my knees and got into it. Jim hitched it behind with the hooks, and it was a fair fit.

stirring up - provocar, suscitar

slip over - resbalar con; ponerse

sharp - agudo, afilado, filoso, listo, sostenido, agrio, certero

shortened - acortado; acortar, abreviar, reducir, acortarse

gowns - batas; manto, capa, túnica, vestido, toga, talar

trouser - Pantalón

I put on the sun-bonnet and tied it under my chin, and then for a body to look in and see my face was like looking down a joint of stove-pipe. Jim said nobody would know me, even in the daytime, hardly. I practiced around all day to get the hang of the things, and by-and-by I could do pretty well in them, only Jim said I didn't walk like a girl; and he said I must quit pulling up my gown to get at my britches-pocket. I took notice, and done better.

joint - en común, comunitario, en conjunto, articulación, coyuntura

hang - colgar

pulling up - levantarse; detenerse

gown - bata; manto, capa, túnica, vestido, toga, talar

britches - Pantalones

I started up the Illinois shore in the canoe just after dark.

I started across to the town from a little below the ferry-landing, and the drift of the current fetched me in at the bottom of the town. I tied up and started along the bank. There was a light burning in a little shanty that hadn't been lived in for a long time, and I wondered who had took up quarters there. I slipped up and peeped in at the window. There was a woman about forty year old in there knitting by a candle that was on a pine table.

wondered - se preguntaba; maravilla, milagro, genio, asombro, pasmo

knitting - tejer; punto, labor de punto; (knit); hacer punto, tricotar

I didn't know her face; she was a stranger, for you couldn't start a face in that town that I didn't know. Now this was lucky, because I was weakening; I was getting afraid I had come; people might know my voice and find me out. But if this woman had been in such a little town two days she could tell me all I wanted to know; so I knocked at the door, and made up my mind I wouldn't forget I was a girl.

weakening - ebilitamiento; debilitar, languir, debilitarse, languecer

knocked at - Golpear, tocar

CHAPTER XI.

"Come in," says the woman, and I did. She says: "Take a cheer."

cheer - animar; viva, hurra

I done it. She looked me all over with her little shiny eyes, and says:

"What might your name be?"

"Sarah Williams."

Williams - williams; Guillermo

"Where 'bouts do you live? In this neighborhood?'

bouts - ombates; ataque (med), rato

neighborhood - vecindad, barrio, vecindario, cercanía

"No'm. In Hookerville, seven mile below. I've walked all the way and I'm all tired out."

"Hungry, too, I reckon. I'll find you something."

"No'm, I ain't hungry. I was so hungry I had to stop two miles below here at a farm; so I ain't hungry no more. It's what makes me so late. My mother's down sick, and out of money and everything, and I come to tell my uncle Abner Moore. He lives at the upper end of the town, she says. I hain't ever been here before. Do you know him?"

"No; but I don't know everybody yet. I haven't lived here quite two weeks. It's a considerable ways to the upper end of the town. You better stay here all night. Take off your bonnet."

"No," I says; "I'll rest a while, I reckon, and go on. I ain't afeared of the dark."

afeared - Miedo

She said she wouldn't let me go by myself, but her husband would be in by-and-by, maybe in a hour and a half, and she'd send him along with me. Then she got to talking about her husband, and about her relations up the river, and her relations down the river, and about how much better off they used to was, and how they didn't know but they'd made a mistake coming to our town, instead of letting well alone"and so on and so on, till I was afeard I had made a mistake coming to her to find out what was going on in the town; but by-and-by she dropped on to pap and the murder, and then I was pretty willing to let her clatter right along.

relations - relación, pariente

clatter - ruido; trapalear

She told about me and Tom Sawyer finding the six thousand dollars (only she got it ten) and all about pap and what a hard lot he was, and what a hard lot I was, and at last she got down to where I was murdered. I says:

murdered - asesinado; asesinato, asesinar, cepillarse, devorar

"Who done it? We've heard considerable about these goings on down in Hookerville, but we don't know who 'twas that killed Huck Finn."

Twas - wa

"Well, I reckon there's a right smart chance of people here that'd like to know who killed him. Some think old Finn done it himself."

"No"is that so?"

"Most everybody thought it at first. He'll never know how nigh he come to getting lynched. But before night they changed around and judged it was done by a runaway nigger named Jim."

runaway - fugitivo, desbocado

"Why he""

I stopped. I reckoned I better keep still. She run on, and never noticed I had put in at all:

keep still - mantenerse quieto

"The nigger run off the very night Huck Finn was killed. So there's a reward out for him"three hundred dollars. And there's a reward out for old Finn, too"two hundred dollars. You see, he come to town the morning after the murder, and told about it, and was out with 'em on the ferry-boat hunt, and right away after he up and left. Before night they wanted to lynch him, but he was gone, you see. Well, next day they found out the nigger was gone; they found out he hadn't ben seen sence ten o'clock the night the murder was done. So then they put it on him, you see; and while they was full of it, next day, back comes old Finn, and went boo-hooing to Judge Thatcher to get money to hunt for the nigger all over Illinois with.

Reward - recompensa

sence - Sentido

boo - abucheo

The judge gave him some, and that evening he got drunk, and was around till after midnight with a couple of mighty hard-looking strangers, and then went off with them. Well, he hain't come back sence, and they ain't looking for him back till this thing blows over a little, for people thinks now that he killed his boy and fixed things so folks would think robbers done it, and then he'd get Huck's money without having to bother a long time with a lawsuit. People do say he warn't any too good to do it. Oh, he's sly, I reckon. If he don't come back for a year he'll be all right. You can't prove anything on him, you know; everything will be quieted down then, and he'll walk in Huck's money as easy as nothing."

strangers - Extrano

sly - astuto, pillo, listo, habilidoso

Prove - probar

"Yes, I reckon so, 'm. I don't see nothing in the way of it. Has everybody quit thinking the nigger done it?"

"Oh, no, not everybody. A good many thinks he done it. But they'll get the nigger pretty soon now, and maybe they can scare it out of him."

scare - miedo; asustar

"Why, are they after him yet?"

"Well, you're innocent, ain't you! Does three hundred dollars lay around every day for people to pick up? Some folks think the nigger ain't far from here. I'm one of them"but I hain't talked it around. A few days ago I was talking with an old couple that lives next door in the log shanty, and they happened to say hardly anybody ever goes to that island over yonder that they call Jackson's Island. Don't anybody live there? says I. No, nobody, says they. I didn't say any more, but I done some thinking. I was pretty near certain I'd seen smoke over there, about the head of the island, a day or two before that, so I says to myself, like as not that nigger's hiding over there; anyway, says I, It's worth the trouble to give the place a hunt. I hain't seen any smoke sence, so I reckon maybe he's gone, if it was him; but husband's going over to see"him and another man. He was gone up the river; but he got back to-day, and I told him as soon as he got here two hours ago.

innocent - inocente

It's worth the trouble - Merece la pena

I had got so uneasy I couldn't set still. I had to do something with my hands; so I took up a needle off of the table and went to threading it. My hands shook, and I was making a bad job of it. When the woman stopped talking I looked up, and she was looking at me pretty curious and smiling a little. I put down the needle and thread, and let on to be interested"and I was, too"and says:

needle - aguja, acícula

threading - enhebrar; hilo, hebra, hilaza, tema, argumento, hilazón

bad job - Mal trabajo

"Three hundred dollars is a power of money. I wish my mother could get it. Is your husband going over there to-night?"

"Oh, yes. He went up-town with the man I was telling you of, to get a boat and see if they could borrow another gun. They'll go over after midnight."

"Couldn't they see better if they was to wait till daytime?"

"Yes. And couldn't the nigger see better, too? After midnight he'll likely be asleep, and they can slip around through the woods and hunt up his camp fire all the better for the dark, if he's got one."

"I didn't think of that."

The woman kept looking at me pretty curious, and I didn't feel a bit comfortable. Pretty soon she says,

"What did you say your name was, honey?"

"M"Mary Williams."

Somehow it didn't seem to me that I said it was Mary before, so I didn't look up"seemed to me I said it was Sarah; so I felt sort of cornered, and was afeared maybe I was looking it, too. I wished the woman would say something more; the longer she set still the uneasier I was. But now she says:

uneasier - más inquieto; inquieto

"Honey, I thought you said it was Sarah when you first come in?"

"Oh, yes'm, I did. Sarah Mary Williams. Sarah's my first name. Some calls me Sarah, some calls me Mary."

"Oh, that's the way of it?"

"Yes'm."

I was feeling better then, but I wished I was out of there, anyway. I couldn't look up yet.

Well, the woman fell to talking about how hard times was, and how poor they had to live, and how the rats was as free as if they owned the place, and so forth and so on, and then I got easy again. She was right about the rats. You'd see one stick his nose out of a hole in the corner every little while. She said she had to have things handy to throw at them when she was alone, or they wouldn't give her no peace. She showed me a bar of lead twisted up into a knot, and said she was a good shot with it generly, but she'd wrenched her arm a day or two ago, and didn't know whether she could throw true now. But she watched for a chance, and directly banged away at a rat; but she missed him wide, and said "Ouch!" it hurt her arm so.

rats - ratas; rata

forth - adelante

lead - llevar; liderar; guiar, dirigir; provocar; encabezar; principal; plomo

twisted - retorcido; torcer, sacar punta a, torcerse

knot - nudo

generly - Generosamente

wrenched - desgarrado; arrancar

banged - golpeado; portazo, golpe estrepitoso

Ouch - Ay

Then she told me to try for the next one. I wanted to be getting away before the old man got back, but of course I didn't let on. I got the thing, and the first rat that showed his nose I let drive, and if he'd a stayed where he was he'd a been a tolerable sick rat. She said that was first-rate, and she reckoned I would hive the next one. She went and got the lump of lead and fetched it back, and brought along a hank of yarn which she wanted me to help her with. I held up my two hands and she put the hank over them, and went on talking about her and her husband's matters. But she broke off to say:

rat - rata

lump - un bulto; bulto, grumo, chichón, cúmulo, agrupación

lead - plomo; llevar, conducir

brought along - trajo consigo

yarn - hilo, hilado, lana, hilaza, cuento

"Keep your eye on the rats. You better have the lead in your lap, handy."

lap - vuelta; lamer

So she dropped the lump into my lap just at that moment, and I clapped my legs together on it and she went on talking. But only about a minute. Then she took off the hank and looked me straight in the face, and very pleasant, and says:

clapped - aplaudió; aplaudir

pleasant - agradable, placentero

"Come, now, what's your real name?"

"Wh"what, mum?"

"What's your real name? Is it Bill, or Tom, or Bob?"or what is it?"

I reckon I shook like a leaf, and I didn't know hardly what to do. But I says:

"Please to don't poke fun at a poor girl like me, mum. If I'm in the way here, I'll""

poke - golpear; meter

"No, you won't. Set down and stay where you are. I ain't going to hurt you, and I ain't going to tell on you, nuther. You just tell me your secret, and trust me. I'll keep it; and, what's more, I'll help you. So'll my old man if you want him to. You see, you're a runaway 'prentice, that's all.

trust - confiar; confianza, crédito, fiar, consorcio, trust

It ain't anything. There ain't no harm in it. You've been treated bad, and you made up your mind to cut. Bless you, child, I wouldn't tell on you. Tell me all about it now, that's a good boy."

treated - tratado; tratar, negociar, rogar, invitar, convidar, sorpresa

bless - bendecir

So I said it wouldn't be no use to try to play it any longer, and I would just make a clean breast and tell her everything, but she musn't go back on her promise. Then I told her my father and mother was dead, and the law had bound me out to a mean old farmer in the country thirty mile back from the river, and he treated me so bad I couldn't stand it no longer; he went away to be gone a couple of days, and so I took my chance and stole some of his daughter's old clothes and cleared out, and I had been three nights coming the thirty miles.

bound - atado; (bind); atar, atar (tie), empastar (books), liar

I traveled nights, and hid daytimes and slept, and the bag of bread and meat I carried from home lasted me all the way, and I had a-plenty. I said I believed my uncle Abner Moore would take care of me, and so that was why I struck out for this town of Goshen.

"Goshen, child? This ain't Goshen. This is St. Petersburg. Goshen's ten mile further up the river. Who told you this was Goshen?"

Petersburg - Petersburgo

"Why, a man I met at daybreak this morning, just as I was going to turn into the woods for my regular sleep. He told me when the roads forked I must take the right hand, and five mile would fetch me to Goshen."

daybreak - amanecer

"He was drunk, I reckon. He told you just exactly wrong."

"Well, he did act like he was drunk, but it ain't no matter now. I got to be moving along. I'll fetch Goshen before daylight."

"Hold on a minute. I'll put you up a snack to eat. You might want it."

snack - un tentempié; tentempié

So she put me up a snack, and says:

"Say, when a cow's laying down, which end of her gets up first? Answer up prompt now"don't stop to study over it. Which end gets up first?"

prompt - rápido, pronto, puntual, pie, entrada, senal, incitar, apuntar

"The hind end, mum."

hind - detrás; cierva

"Well, then, a horse?"

"The for'rard end, mum."

rard - ard

"Which side of a tree does the moss grow on?"

moss - musgo

grow on - crecer

"North side."

"If fifteen cows is browsing on a hillside, how many of them eats with their heads pointed the same direction?"

"The whole fifteen, mum."

"Well, I reckon you have lived in the country. I thought maybe you was trying to hocus me again. What's your real name, now?"

"George Peters, mum."

George - Jorge

Peters - peters; Pedro, Pedro

"Well, try to remember it, George. Don't forget and tell me it's Elexander before you go, and then get out by saying it's George Elexander when I catch you. And don't go about women in that old calico. You do a girl tolerable poor, but you might fool men, maybe. Bless you, child, when you set out to thread a needle don't hold the thread still and fetch the needle up to it; hold the needle still and poke the thread at it; that's the way a woman most always does, but a man always does t'other way. And when you throw at a rat or anything, hitch yourself up a tiptoe and fetch your hand up over your head as awkward as you can, and miss your rat about six or seven foot. Throw stiff-armed from the shoulder, like there was a pivot there for it to turn on, like a girl; not from the wrist and elbow, with your arm out to one side, like a boy. And, mind you, when a girl tries to catch anything in her lap she throws her knees apart; she don't clap them together, the way you did when you catched the lump of lead.

Hitch - enganche; inconveniente, contratiempo

tiptoe - punta del pie, caminar de puntillas

awkward - torpe, desmanado, embarazoso, delicado, incómodo, tímido

stiff - rígido, duro, tieso, inflexible

pivot - pivotar, pivote, giro

wrist - muneca; muneca

clap - aplaudir

Why, I spotted you for a boy when you was threading the needle; and I contrived the other things just to make certain. Now trot along to your uncle, Sarah Mary Williams George Elexander Peters, and if you get into trouble you send word to Mrs. Judith Loftus, which is me, and I'll do what I can to get you out of it. Keep the river road all the way, and next time you tramp take shoes and socks with you. The river road's a rocky one, and your feet'll be in a condition when you get to Goshen, I reckon."

spotted - manchado; mancha, grano, poquito, poquita, zona, paraje

contrived - ingenioso; idear, improvisar

Judith - Judit

I went up the bank about fifty yards, and then I doubled on my tracks and slipped back to where my canoe was, a good piece below the house. I jumped in, and was off in a hurry. I went up-stream far enough to make the head of the island, and then started across. I took off the sun-bonnet, for I didn't want no blinders on then. When I was about the middle I heard the clock begin to strike, so I stops and listens; the sound come faint over the water but clear"eleven.

blinders - ojeras; orejera

strike - tachar, borrar, golpear, pegar, acunar, hacer la huelga

faint - desmayarse; débil, tenue

When I struck the head of the island I never waited to blow, though I was most winded, but I shoved right into the timber where my old camp used to be, and started a good fire there on a high and dry spot.

winded - sin aliento

spot - unto; mancha, grano, poquito, poquita, zona, paraje, lámpara

Then I jumped in the canoe and dug out for our place, a mile and a half below, as hard as I could go. I landed, and slopped through the timber and up the ridge and into the cavern. There Jim laid, sound asleep on the ground. I roused him out and says:

dug out - desenterrado, sacado

slopped - rechazado; derramar(se), verter(se)

roused - despertado; despertar

"Git up and hump yourself, Jim! There ain't a minute to lose. They're after us!"

hump - joroba, corcova, giba, cochar, montarse, cochar; montarse

Jim never asked no questions, he never said a word; but the way he worked for the next half an hour showed about how he was scared. By that time everything we had in the world was on our raft, and she was ready to be shoved out from the willow cove where she was hid. We put out the camp fire at the cavern the first thing, and didn't show a candle outside after that.

Cove - cala, ensenada

I took the canoe out from the shore a little piece, and took a look; but if there was a boat around I couldn't see it, for stars and shadows ain't good to see by. Then we got out the raft and slipped along down in the shade, past the foot of the island dead still"never saying a word.

CHAPTER XII.

It must a been close on to one o'clock when we got below the island at last, and the raft did seem to go mighty slow. If a boat was to come along we was going to take to the canoe and break for the Illinois shore; and it was well a boat didn't come, for we hadn't ever thought to put the gun in the canoe, or a fishing-line, or anything to eat.

fishing-line - (fishing-line) sedal, tanza

We was in ruther too much of a sweat to think of so many things. It warn't good judgment to put everything on the raft.

If the men went to the island I just expect they found the camp fire I built, and watched it all night for Jim to come. Anyways, they stayed away from us, and if my building the fire never fooled them it warn't no fault of mine. I played it as low down on them as I could.

stayed away - se mantuvo alejado

When the first streak of day began to show we tied up to a tow-head in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked off cottonwood branches with the hatchet, and covered up the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-in in the bank there. A tow-head is a sandbar that has cottonwoods on it as thick as harrow-teeth.

sandbar - barra de arena; sirte

cottonwoods - algodoncillo; álamo

We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy timber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Missouri shore at that place, so we warn't afraid of anybody running across us. We laid there all day, and watched the rafts and steamboats spin down the Missouri shore, and up-bound steamboats fight the big river in the middle. I told Jim all about the time I had jabbering with that woman; and Jim said she was a smart one, and if she was to start after us herself she wouldn't set down and watch a camp fire"no, sir, she'd fetch a dog.

steamboats - barcos de vapor; barco de vapor

spin - hacer girar

jabbering - farfullando; (jabber) farfullando

Well, then, I said, why couldn't she tell her husband to fetch a dog? Jim said he bet she did think of it by the time the men was ready to start, and he believed they must a gone up-town to get a dog and so they lost all that time, or else we wouldn't be here on a tow-head sixteen or seventeen mile below the village"no, indeedy, we would be in that same old town again. So I said I didn't care what was the reason they didn't get us as long as they didn't.

old town - ciudad vieja, casco antiguo

When it was beginning to come on dark we poked our heads out of the cottonwood thicket, and looked up and down and across; nothing in sight; so Jim took up some of the top planks of the raft and built a snug wigwam to get under in blazing weather and rainy, and to keep the things dry. Jim made a floor for the wigwam, and raised it a foot or more above the level of the raft, so now the blankets and all the traps was out of reach of steamboat waves. Right in the middle of the wigwam we made a layer of dirt about five or six inches deep with a frame around it for to hold it to its place; this was to build a fire on in sloppy weather or chilly; the wigwam would keep it from being seen.

cottonwood - algodoncillo; álamo

thicket - matorral, bosquecillo

snug - cómodo, confortable, ajustado, cenido

wigwam - toldo

get under - pasar por debajo/ meterse debajo

rainy - lloviendo; lluvioso, pluvioso

sloppy - desalinado; empapado, desprolijo, chapucero, descuidado

chilly - frío

We made an extra steering-oar, too, because one of the others might get broke on a snag or something. We fixed up a short forked stick to hang the old lantern on, because we must always light the lantern whenever we see a steamboat coming down-stream, to keep from getting run over; but we wouldn't have to light it for up-stream boats unless we see we was in what they call a "crossing"; for the river was pretty high yet, very low banks being still a little under water; so up-bound boats didn't always run the channel, but hunted easy water.

steering - dirección; (steer); dirección

oar - remo

snag - enganche; pega, problema, inconveniente

Unless - menos que..; a menos que, a no ser que, salvo

This second night we run between seven and eight hours, with a current that was making over four mile an hour. We catched fish and talked, and we took a swim now and then to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down the big, still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars, and we didn't ever feel like talking loud, and it warn't often that we laughed"only a little kind of a low chuckle.

sleepiness - somnolencia; sueno

solemn - solemne

drifting - deriva, derrape, ir a la deriva, vagar, derivar, errar

chuckle - reírse (entre dientes)

We had mighty good weather as a general thing, and nothing ever happened to us at all"that night, nor the next, nor the next.

Every night we passed towns, some of them away up on black hillsides, nothing but just a shiny bed of lights; not a house could you see. The fifth night we passed St. Louis, and it was like the whole world lit up. In St. Petersburg they used to say there was twenty or thirty thousand people in St.

hillsides - aderas; falda

Louis, but I never believed it till I see that wonderful spread of lights at two o'clock that still night. There warn't a sound there; everybody was asleep.

Every night now I used to slip ashore towards ten o'clock at some little village, and buy ten or fifteen cents'worth of meal or bacon or other stuff to eat; and sometimes I lifted a chicken that warn't roosting comfortable, and took him along. Pap always said, take a chicken when you get a chance, because if you don't want him yourself you can easy find somebody that does, and a good deed ain't ever forgot.

roosting - posada; percha, gallinero

good deed - una buena acción

I never see pap when he didn't want the chicken himself, but that is what he used to say, anyway.

Mornings before daylight I slipped into cornfields and borrowed a watermelon, or a mushmelon, or a punkin, or some new corn, or things of that kind. Pap always said it warn't no harm to borrow things if you was meaning to pay them back some time; but the widow said it warn't anything but a soft name for stealing, and no decent body would do it. Jim said he reckoned the widow was partly right and pap was partly right; so the best way would be for us to pick out two or three things from the list and say we wouldn't borrow them any more"then he reckoned it wouldn't be no harm to borrow the others.

cornfields - maizales; milpa, maizal, mieses

watermelon - sandía, melón de agua

mushmelon - Sh mushmelon

punkin - Pepinillo

partly - en parte, en cierto modo

So we talked it over all one night, drifting along down the river, trying to make up our minds whether to drop the watermelons, or the cantelopes, or the mushmelons, or what. But towards daylight we got it all settled satisfactory, and concluded to drop crabapples and p'simmons. We warn't feeling just right before that, but it was all comfortable now. I was glad the way it come out, too, because crabapples ain't ever good, and the p'simmons wouldn't be ripe for two or three months yet.

watermelons - sandías; sandía, melón de agua

cantelopes - Cantelopos

mushmelons - melones

concluded - concluido; concluir

We shot a water-fowl, now and then, that got up too early in the morning or didn't go to bed early enough in the evening. Take it all round, we lived pretty high.

fowl - aves; ave de corral

The fifth night below St. Louis we had a big storm after midnight, with a power of thunder and lightning, and the rain poured down in a solid sheet. We stayed in the wigwam and let the raft take care of itself. When the lightning glared out we could see a big straight river ahead, and high, rocky bluffs on both sides. By-and-by says I, "Hel-lo, Jim, looky yonder!

poured - vertido; verter, derramar; chorrear; manar, salir

glared - miró; mirada fulminante

It was a steamboat that had killed herself on a rock. We was drifting straight down for her. The lightning showed her very distinct. She was leaning over, with part of her upper deck above water, and you could see every little chimbly-guy clean and clear, and a chair by the big bell, with an old slouch hat hanging on the back of it, when the flashes come.

distinct - distinto

leaning - Inclinado; (lean) Inclinado

upper deck - la cubierta superior

slouch hat - sombrero de fieltro, sombrero de ala ancha

flashes - flashes; destello

Well, it being away in the night and stormy, and all so mysterious-like, I felt just the way any other boy would a felt when I see that wreck laying there so mournful and lonesome in the middle of the river. I wanted to get aboard of her and slink around a little, and see what there was there. So I says:

stormy - borrascoso, tempestuoso, tormentoso

mysterious - misterioso

wreck - naufragio; cacharro, trasto, guinapo, choque, desastre

"Le's land on her, Jim."

But Jim was dead against it at first. He says:

"I doan'want to go fool'n 'long er no wrack. We's doin'blame'well, en we better let blame'well alone, as de good book says. Like as not dey's a watchman on dat wrack."

watchman - vigilante; guardián, celador, guarda, vigía

"Watchman your grandmother," I says; "there ain't nothing to watch but the texas and the pilot-house; and do you reckon anybody's going to resk his life for a texas and a pilot-house such a night as this, when it's likely to break up and wash off down the river any minute?" Jim couldn't say nothing to that, so he didn't try. "And besides," I says, "we might borrow something worth having out of the captain's stateroom. Seegars, I bet you"and cost five cents apiece, solid cash. Steamboat captains is always rich, and get sixty dollars a month, and they don't care a cent what a thing costs, you know, long as they want it. Stick a candle in your pocket; I can't rest, Jim, till we give her a rummaging. Do you reckon Tom Sawyer would ever go by this thing? Not for pie, he wouldn't. He'd call it an adventure"that's what he'd call it; and he'd land on that wreck if it was his last act. And wouldn't he throw style into it?

Texas - Texas, Tejas

stateroom - amarote

captains - capitanes; capitán, capitanear, pilotar

rummaging - rebuscando; revolver

last act - último acto

wouldn't he spread himself, nor nothing? Why, you'd think it was Christopher C'lumbus discovering Kingdom-Come. I wish Tom Sawyer was here."

Christopher - Cristóbal

Kingdom - reino

Jim he grumbled a little, but give in. He said we mustn't talk any more than we could help, and then talk mighty low. The lightning showed us the wreck again just in time, and we fetched the stabboard derrick, and made fast there.

grumbled - refunfunó; refunfunar, rezongar

The deck was high out here. We went sneaking down the slope of it to labboard, in the dark, towards the texas, feeling our way slow with our feet, and spreading our hands out to fend off the guys, for it was so dark we couldn't see no sign of them. Pretty soon we struck the forward end of the skylight, and clumb on to it; and the next step fetched us in front of the captain's door, which was open, and by Jimminy, away down through the texas-hall we see a light!

deck - baraja

slope - pendiente, cuesta, desnivel, inclinación, ojo chueco, chuequito

hands out - repartir

fend - defenderse

skylight - tragaluz, claraboya, celaje

and all in the same second we seem to hear low voices in yonder!

Jim whispered and said he was feeling powerful sick, and told me to come along. I says, all right, and was going to start for the raft; but just then I heard a voice wail out and say:

start for - empezar para; inicio para

wail - aullido; llorar, gimotear; ulular; planir

"Oh, please don't, boys; I swear I won't ever tell!"

swear - jurar

Another voice said, pretty loud:

"It's a lie, Jim Turner. You've acted this way before. You always want more'n your share of the truck, and you've always got it, too, because you've swore 't if you didn't you'd tell. But this time you've said it jest one time too many. You're the meanest, treacherousest hound in this country."

jest - bromea; broma

treacherousest - el más traicionero

hound - sabueso; perro de caza

By this time Jim was gone for the raft. I was just a-biling with curiosity; and I says to myself, Tom Sawyer wouldn't back out now, and so I won't either; I'm a-going to see what's going on here. So I dropped on my hands and knees in the little passage, and crept aft in the dark till there warn't but one stateroom betwixt me and the cross-hall of the texas.

curiosity - curiosidad

passage - pasaje; pasillo, pasadizo

Then in there I see a man stretched on the floor and tied hand and foot, and two men standing over him, and one of them had a dim lantern in his hand, and the other one had a pistol. This one kept pointing the pistol at the man's head on the floor, and saying:

pistol - pistola

"I'd like to! And I orter, too"a mean skunk!"

orter - rter

skunk - zorrillo; mofeta

The man on the floor would shrivel up and say, "Oh, please don't, Bill; I hain't ever goin'to tell."

shrivel - arrugarse; arrugar

And every time he said that the man with the lantern would laugh and say:

"'Deed you ain't! You never said no truer thing 'n that, you bet you." And once he said: "Hear him beg! and yit if we hadn't got the best of him and tied him he'd a killed us both. And what for? Jist for noth'n. Jist because we stood on our rights"that's what for. But I lay you ain't a-goin'to threaten nobody any more, Jim Turner. Put up that pistol, Bill."

deed - hecho, acto, acción, obra, hazana; (dee); hecho, acto, acción

beg - pedir limosna; pedir

threaten - amenazar

Bill says:

"I don't want to, Jake Packard. I'm for killin'him"and didn't he kill old Hatfield jist the same way"and don't he deserve it?"

Jake - Santi, Diego, Iago, Yago

deserve - merecer, meritar

"But I don't want him killed, and I've got my reasons for it."

"Bless yo'heart for them words, Jake Packard! I'll never forgit you long's I live!" says the man on the floor, sort of blubbering.

forgit - Perdón

Packard didn't take no notice of that, but hung up his lantern on a nail and started towards where I was there in the dark, and motioned Bill to come. I crawfished as fast as I could about two yards, but the boat slanted so that I couldn't make very good time; so to keep from getting run over and catched I crawled into a stateroom on the upper side. The man came a-pawing along in the dark, and when Packard got to my stateroom, he says:

nail - un clavo; una

motioned - movimiento, moción

crawfished - pescado; recular

slanted - inclinada; inclinación

pawing - manoseo; pata, garra (gato), zarpa (león)

"Here"come in here."

And in he come, and Bill after him. But before they got in I was up in the upper berth, cornered, and sorry I come. Then they stood there, with their hands on the ledge of the berth, and talked. I couldn't see them, but I could tell where they was by the whisky they'd been having. I was glad I didn't drink whisky; but it wouldn't made much difference anyway, because most of the time they couldn't a treed me because I didn't breathe.

berth - itera; catre, amarradero, plaza, atracar

ledge - repisa, alféizar, estante

I was too scared. And, besides, a body couldn't breathe and hear such talk. They talked low and earnest. Bill wanted to kill Turner. He says:

"He's said he'll tell, and he will. If we was to give both our shares to him now it wouldn't make no difference after the row and the way we've served him. Shore's you're born, he'll turn State's evidence; now you hear me. I'm for putting him out of his troubles."

Row - hilera, fila

"So'm I," says Packard, very quiet.

"Blame it, I'd sorter begun to think you wasn't. Well, then, that's all right. Le's go and do it."

sorter - Clasificador

"Hold on a minute; I hain't had my say yit. You listen to me. Shooting's good, but there's quieter ways if the thing's got to be done. But what I say is this: it ain't good sense to go court'n around after a halter if you can git at what you're up to in some way that's jist as good and at the same time don't bring you into no resks. Ain't that so?"

halter - cabestro, ronzal; (halt) cabestro, ronzal

resks - resultados

"You bet it is. But how you goin'to manage it this time?"

manage it - Gestionarlo

"Well, my idea is this: we'll rustle around and gather up whatever pickins we've overlooked in the staterooms, and shove for shore and hide the truck. Then we'll wait. Now I say it ain't a-goin'to be more'n two hours befo'this wrack breaks up and washes off down the river.

rustle - susurro; crujido

gather - reunirnos; juntar, recoger, recolectar, acumular, reunir

pickins - Recogidas

overlooked - pasado por alto; mirador, pasar por alto, otear

staterooms - amarote

befo - antes

See? He'll be drownded, and won't have nobody to blame for it but his own self. I reckon that's a considerble sight better 'n killin'of him. I'm unfavorable to killin'a man as long as you can git aroun'it; it ain't good sense, it ain't good morals. Ain't I right?"

considerble - Considerable

unfavorable - desfavorable

aroun - Anda

morals - moral, moraleja

"Yes, I reck'n you are. But s'pose she don't break up and wash off?"

"Well, we can wait the two hours anyway and see, can't we?"

"All right, then; come along."

So they started, and I lit out, all in a cold sweat, and scrambled forward. It was dark as pitch there; but I said, in a kind of a coarse whisper, "Jim!" and he answered up, right at my elbow, with a sort of a moan, and I says:

cold sweat - sudor frío

pitch - plantar, armar, montar

coarse - grosero; tosco, rústico, rudo, bruto

moan - gimotear; gemido, quejido, quejar, gemir

"Quick, Jim, it ain't no time for fooling around and moaning; there's a gang of murderers in yonder, and if we don't hunt up their boat and set her drifting down the river so these fellows can't get away from the wreck there's one of 'em going to be in a bad fix.

murderers - asesinos; asesino, asesina, victimario, victimaria

But if we find their boat we can put all of 'em in a bad fix"for the sheriff 'll get 'em. Quick"hurry! I'll hunt the labboard side, you hunt the stabboard. You start at the raft, and""

sheriff - sheriff, cherife, alguacil

"Oh, my lordy, lordy! Raf'? Dey ain'no raf'no mo'; she done broke loose en gone I"en here we is!"

CHAPTER XIII.

Well, I catched my breath and most fainted. Shut up on a wreck with such a gang as that! But it warn't no time to be sentimentering. We'd got to find that boat now"had to have it for ourselves. So we went a-quaking and shaking down the stabboard side, and slow work it was, too"seemed a week before we got to the stern. No sign of a boat. Jim said he didn't believe he could go any further"so scared he hadn't hardly any strength left, he said. But I said, come on, if we get left on this wreck we are in a fix, sure. So on we prowled again. We struck for the stern of the texas, and found it, and then scrabbled along forwards on the skylight, hanging on from shutter to shutter, for the edge of the skylight was in the water. When we got pretty close to the cross-hall door, there was the skiff, sure enough!

fainted - desmayado; débil, tenue

sentimentering - sentimiento

quaking - Tiembla; (quake) Tiembla

strength - fuerza, neque, potencia, intensidad, fuerte, fortaleza

prowled - merodeaba; acechar, merodear, aguaitar

scrabbled - raspado; Scrabble

shutter - postigo, contraventana, obturador

I could just barely see her. I felt ever so thankful. In another second I would a been aboard of her, but just then the door opened. One of the men stuck his head out only about a couple of foot from me, and I thought I was gone; but he jerked it in again, and says:

barely - apenas

thankful - agradecido

jerked - sacudido; sacudida

"Heave that blame lantern out o'sight, Bill!"

He flung a bag of something into the boat, and then got in himself and set down. It was Packard. Then Bill he come out and got in. Packard says, in a low voice:

"All ready"shove off!"

I couldn't hardly hang on to the shutters, I was so weak. But Bill says:

shutters - persianas; postigo, contraventana, obturador

"Hold on"'d you go through him?"

"No. Didn't you?"

"No. So he's got his share o'the cash yet."

"Well, then, come along; no use to take truck and leave money."

"Say, won't he suspicion what we're up to?"

suspicion - sospecha, suspicacia

"Maybe he won't. But we got to have it anyway. Come along."

So they got out and went in.

The door slammed to because it was on the careened side; and in a half second I was in the boat, and Jim come tumbling after me. I out with my knife and cut the rope, and away we went!

slammed - golpeado; cerrar de golpe

careened - se desvió; carenar

rope - cuerda

We didn't touch an oar, and we didn't speak nor whisper, nor hardly even breathe. We went gliding swift along, dead silent, past the tip of the paddle-box, and past the stern; then in a second or two more we was a hundred yards below the wreck, and the darkness soaked her up, every last sign of her, and we was safe, and knowed it.

silent - silencioso, callar, checkcallado

soaked - empapado; empapar, remojar, embeber, saturar, esponjar

When we was three or four hundred yards down-stream we see the lantern show like a little spark at the texas door for a second, and we knowed by that that the rascals had missed their boat, and was beginning to understand that they was in just as much trouble now as Jim Turner was.

spark - chispa

rascals - gamberros; pícaro, bribón, canalla

Then Jim manned the oars, and we took out after our raft. Now was the first time that I begun to worry about the men"I reckon I hadn't had time to before. I begun to think how dreadful it was, even for murderers, to be in such a fix. I says to myself, there ain't no telling but I might come to be a murderer myself yet, and then how would I like it? So says I to Jim:

murderer - asesino, asesina, victimario, victimaria

"The first light we see we'll land a hundred yards below it or above it, in a place where it's a good hiding-place for you and the skiff, and then I'll go and fix up some kind of a yarn, and get somebody to go for that gang and get them out of their scrape, so they can be hung when their time comes."

hiding-place - (hiding-place) escondite

But that idea was a failure; for pretty soon it begun to storm again, and this time worse than ever. The rain poured down, and never a light showed; everybody in bed, I reckon. We boomed along down the river, watching for lights and watching for our raft. After a long time the rain let up, but the clouds stayed, and the lightning kept whimpering, and by-and-by a flash showed us a black thing ahead, floating, and we made for it.

failure - fallo, fracaso, fiasco, fracasado, avería

boomed - explotó; boom, auge

whimpering - Gimoteo; (whimper); gimoteo, lloriquear

flash - destello

It was the raft, and mighty glad was we to get aboard of it again. We seen a light now away down to the right, on shore. So I said I would go for it. The skiff was half full of plunder which that gang had stole there on the wreck. We hustled it on to the raft in a pile, and I told Jim to float along down, and show a light when he judged he had gone about two mile, and keep it burning till I come; then I manned my oars and shoved for the light. As I got down towards it, three or four more showed"up on a hillside. It was a village. I closed in above the shore light, and laid on my oars and floated. As I went by, I see it was a lantern hanging on the jackstaff of a double-hull ferry-boat.

on shore - en la orilla

plunder - saquear, saqueo, botín

hustled - presionado; darse prisa, apurarse, enganar, engrupir

pile - montón, pila

laid on - poner encima de algo; aprovisionar

I skimmed around for the watchman, a-wondering whereabouts he slept; and by-and-by I found him roosting on the bitts, forward, with his head down between his knees. I gave his shoulder two or three little shoves, and begun to cry.

skimmed - desnatada; sobrevolar rozando, rebotar, hojear, leer por encima

whereabouts - dónde; paradero; (whereabout) dónde; paradero

bitts - bits; bita

shoves - empujones; empujar

He stirred up, in a kind of a startlish way; but when he see it was only me, he took a good gap and stretch, and then he says:

stirred up - provocar, suscitar

startlish - Estrellada

"Hello, What's up? don't cry, bub. What's the trouble?"

What's up? - ?Qué pasa?

don't cry - No llores

What's the trouble? - ?Cuál es el problema?

I says:

"Pap, and mam, and sis, and""

Mam - Mamá

Then I broke down. He says:

"Oh, dang it now, don't take on so; we all has to have our troubles, and this'n 'll come out all right. What's the matter with 'em?"

Dang - Maldición

"They're"they're"are you the watchman of the boat?"

"Yes," he says, kind of pretty-well-satisfied like. "I'm the captain and the owner and the mate and the pilot and watchman and head deck-hand; and sometimes I'm the freight and passengers. I ain't as rich as old Jim Hornback, and I can't be so blame'generous and good to Tom, Dick and Harry as what he is, and slam around money the way he does; but I've told him a many a time 't I wouldn't trade places with him; for, says I, a sailor's life's the life for me, and I'm derned if I'd live two mile out o'town, where there ain't nothing ever goin'on, not for all his spondulicks and as much more on top of it.

deck - cubierta

freight - carga, mercancías

generous - generoso, magnánimo, dadivoso, munificente

Dick and Harry - Dick y Harry

slam - cerrar de golpe

trade - comercio

places with - Lugar con; colocar con

sailor - marinero, marinera

derned - Maldito

spondulicks - espondulicks

Says I""

I broke in and says:

"They're in an awful peck of trouble, and""

peck - picotear

"Who is?"

"Why, pap and mam and sis and Miss Hooker; and if you'd take your ferry-boat and go up there""

hooker - prostituta; hooker

"Up where? Where are they?"

"On the wreck."

"What wreck?"

"Why, there ain't but one."

"What, you don't mean the Walter Scott?"

"Yes."

"Good land! what are they doin'there, for gracious sakes?"

sakes - para qué; por, por motivo de; por el bien de

"Well, they didn't go there a-purpose."

"I bet they didn't! Why, great goodness, there ain't no chance for 'em if they don't git off mighty quick! Why, how in the nation did they ever git into such a scrape?"

"Easy enough. Miss Hooker was a-visiting up there to the town""

"Yes, Booth's Landing"go on."

booth - puesto, stand, cabina, garita

"She was a-visiting there at Booth's Landing, and just in the edge of the evening she started over with her nigger woman in the horse-ferry to stay all night at her friend's house, Miss What-you-may-call-her I disremember her name"and they lost their steering-oar, and swung around and went a-floating down, stern first, about two mile, and saddle-baggsed on the wreck, and the ferryman and the nigger woman and the horses was all lost, but Miss Hooker she made a grab and got aboard the wreck.

disremember - recuerdas

swung - se balanceó; balancear, mecer, columpiar, oscilar, columpio

baggsed - Bolsado

ferryman - transbordador; barquero, balsero

Well, about an hour after dark we come along down in our trading-scow, and it was so dark we didn't notice the wreck till we was right on it; and so we saddle-baggsed; but all of us was saved but Bill Whipple"and oh, he was the best cretur!"I most wish't it had been me, I do."

trading - Comercio; (trad) Comercio

scow - una lancha

"My George! It's the beatenest thing I ever struck. And then what did you all do?"

beatenest - Más batido

"Well, we hollered and took on, but it's so wide there we couldn't make nobody hear. So pap said somebody got to get ashore and get help somehow. I was the only one that could swim, so I made a dash for it, and Miss Hooker she said if I didn't strike help sooner, come here and hunt up her uncle, and he'd fix the thing.

Dash - raya, guion largo, carrerita, gota, pizca, lanzarse, romper

I made the land about a mile below, and been fooling along ever since, trying to get people to do something, but they said, ˜What, in such a night and such a current? There ain't no sense in it; go for the steam ferry.'Now if you'll go and""

Steam - vapor

"By Jackson, I'd like to, and, blame it, I don't know but I will; but who in the dingnation's a-going'to pay for it? Do you reckon your pap""

dingnation - ingnación

"Why that's all right. Miss Hooker she tole me, particular, that her uncle Hornback""

"Great guns! is he her uncle? Looky here, you break for that light over yonder-way, and turn out west when you git there, and about a quarter of a mile out You'll come to the tavern; tell 'em to dart you out to Jim Hornback's, and he'll foot the bill. And don't you fool around any, because he'll want to know the news. Tell him I'll have his niece all safe before he can get to town.

You'll come - Vendrás

tavern - taberna

dart - dardo, flechilla

fool around - hacer el tonto, holgazanear, tener relaciones, jugar con

niece - sobrina

Hump yourself, now; I'm a-going up around the corner here to roust out my engineer."

I struck for the light, but as soon as he turned the corner I went back and got into my skiff and bailed her out, and then pulled up shore in the easy water about six hundred yards, and tucked myself in among some woodboats; for I couldn't rest easy till I could see the ferry-boat start.

bailed - abandonado; fianza

woodboats - barcos de madera

But take it all around, I was feeling ruther comfortable on accounts of taking all this trouble for that gang, for not many would a done it. I wished the widow knowed about it. I judged she would be proud of me for helping these rapscallions, because rapscallions and dead beats is the kind the widow and good people takes the most interest in.

on accounts - n las cuentas

rapscallions - apscallions; gamberro

It did seem a powerful long time before Jim's light showed up; and when it did show, it looked like it was a thousand mile off. By the time I got there the sky was beginning to get a little gray in the east; so we struck for an island, and hid the raft, and sunk the skiff, and turned in and slept like dead people.

CHAPTER XIV.

By-and-by, when we got up, we turned over the truck the gang had stole off of the wreck, and found boots, and blankets, and clothes, and all sorts of other things, and a lot of books, and a spyglass, and three boxes of seegars. We hadn't ever been this rich before in neither of our lives. The seegars was prime. We laid off all the afternoon in the woods talking, and me reading the books, and having a general good time. I told Jim all about what happened inside the wreck and at the ferry-boat, and I said these kinds of things was adventures; but he said he didn't want no more adventures. He said that when I went in the texas and he crawled back to get on the raft and found her gone, he nearly died; because he judged it was all up with him, anyway it could be fixed; for if he didn't get saved he would get drownded; and if he did get saved, whoever saved him would send him back home so as to get the reward, and then Miss Watson would sell him South, sure.

Spyglass - cristal espía; catalejo

Well, he was right; he was most always right; he had an uncommon level head, for a nigger.

I read considerable to Jim about kings and dukes and earls and such, and how gaudy they dressed, and how much style they put on, and called each other your majesty, and your grace, and your lordship, and so on, 'stead of mister; and Jim's eyes bugged out, and he was interested. He says:

Dukes - dukes; duque

earls - condes; conde

gaudy - vistoso, llamativo, chillón

Majesty - majestad

grace - gracias, benedícite, gracia, donaire, merced

Lordship - senorío; el Senor, senoría, esfera, senorío

bugged - interfectado; chinche, bicho, error, fallo, defecto, bug, manía

"I didn'know dey was so many un um. I hain't hearn 'bout none un um, skasely, but ole King Sollermun, onless you counts dem kings dat's in a pack er k'yards. How much do a king git?"

un - ONU

onless - nless

"Get?" I says; "why, they get a thousand dollars a month if they want it; they can have just as much as they want; everything belongs to them."

"Ain'dat gay? En what dey got to do, Huck?"

gay - gay, homosexual

"They don't do nothing! Why, how you talk! They just set around."

"No; is dat so?"

"Of course it is. They just set around"except, maybe, when there's a war; then they go to the war. But other times they just lazy around; or go hawking"just hawking and sp" Sh!"d'you hear a noise?"

We skipped out and looked; but it warn't nothing but the flutter of a steamboat's wheel away down, coming around the point; so we come back.

flutter - leteo; ondear, aletear

"Yes," says I, "and other times, when things is dull, they fuss with the parlyment; and if everybody don't go just so he whacks their heads off. But mostly they hang round the harem."

fuss - alboroto; fandango, jaleo, escándalo

whacks - golpes; porrazo, trompazo, cebollazo, golpear

harem - harén

"Roun'de which?"

"Harem."

"What's de harem?"

"The place where he keeps his wives. Don't you know about the harem? Solomon had one; he had about a million wives."

Solomon - Salomón

"Why, yes, dat's so; I"I'd done forgot it. A harem's a bo'd'n-house, I reck'n. Mos'likely dey has rackety times in de nussery. En I reck'n de wives quarrels considable; en dat 'crease de racket. Yit dey say Sollermun de wises'man dat ever live'. I doan'take no stock in dat.

rackety - Chiflado

nussery - ussery

quarrels - peleas; pelea, rina

crease - arruga, pliegue, raya

wises - sabios; sabio

Bekase why: would a wise man want to live in de mids'er sich a blim-blammin'all de time? No"'deed he wouldn't. A wise man 'ud take en buil'a biler-factry; en den he could shet down de biler-factry when he want to res'."

wise - sabio

mids - medios; a mitad, en medio

biler - iler

factry - facultad

"Well, but he was the wisest man, anyway; because the widow she told me so, her own self."

wisest - el más sabio; sabio

"I doan k'yer what de widder say, he warn't no wise man nuther. He had some er de dad-fetchedes'ways I ever see. Does you know 'bout dat chile dat he 'uz gwyne to chop in two?"

chop - chuleta; cortar en trozos

"Yes, the widow told me all about it."

"Well, den! Warn'dat de beatenes'notion in de worl'? You jes'take en look at it a minute. Dah's de stump, dah"dat's one er de women; heah's you"dat's de yuther one; I's Sollermun; en dish yer dollar bill's de chile. Bofe un you claims it. What does I do? Does I shin aroun'mongs'de neighbors en fine out which un you de bill do b'long to, en han'it over to de right one, all safe en soun', de way dat anybody dat had any gumption would?

beatenes - Gatienes

worl - el mundo

claims - reclamaciones; reclamación, declaración, proposición

neighbors - vecinos; vecino

soun - Sun

gumption - gobierno; caletre, coraje, iniciativa, entusiasmo

No; I take en whack de bill in two, en give half un it to you, en de yuther half to de yuther woman. Dat's de way Sollermun was gwyne to do wid de chile. Now I want to ast you: what's de use er dat half a bill?"can't buy noth'n wid it. En what use is a half a chile? I wouldn'give a dern for a million un um."

"But hang it, Jim, you've clean missed the point"blame it, you've missed it a thousand mile."

"Who? Me? Go 'long. Doan'talk to me 'bout yo'pints. I reck'n I knows sense when I sees it; en dey ain'no sense in sich doin's as dat. De 'spute warn't 'bout a half a chile, de 'spute was 'bout a whole chile; en de man dat think he kin settle a 'spute 'bout a whole chile wid a half a chile doan'know enough to come in out'n de rain. Doan'talk to me 'bout Sollermun, Huck, I knows him by de back."

pints - pintas; pinta

settle - nos conformamos; instalar, colocar

"But I tell you you don't get the point."

"Blame de point! I reck'n I knows what I knows. En mine you, de real pint is down furder"it's down deeper. It lays in de way Sollermun was raised. You take a man dat's got on'y one or two chillen; is dat man gwyne to be waseful o'chillen? No, he ain't; he can't 'ford it. He know how to value 'em. But you take a man dat's got 'bout five million chillen runnin'roun'de house, en it's diffunt.

pint - una pinta; pinta

lays - lays; poner, colocar

waseful - Despilfarrador

ford - vado, vadear

value - valor, importancia, valorar, cifrar, apreciar

runnin - Corriendo

He as soon chop a chile in two as a cat. Dey's plenty mo'. A chile er two, mo'er less, warn't no consekens to Sollermun, dad fatch him!"

consekens - consejos

I never see such a nigger. If he got a notion in his head once, there warn't no getting it out again. He was the most down on Solomon of any nigger I ever see. So I went to talking about other kings, and let Solomon slide. I told about Louis Sixteenth that got his head cut off in France long time ago; and about his little boy the dolphin, that would a been a king, but they took and shut him up in jail, and some say he died there.

Sixteenth - dieciséis; decimosexto, dieciseisavo

dolphin - delfín

jail - cárcel, prisión, presidio, penal

"Po'little chap."

"But some says he got out and got away, and come to America."

"Dat's good! But he'll be pooty lonesome"dey ain'no kings here, is dey, Huck?"

"No."

"Den he cain't git no situation. What he gwyne to do?"

"Well, I don't know. Some of them gets on the police, and some of them learns people how to talk French."

gets on - subirse a, triunfar

French - francés, franceses

"Why, Huck, doan'de French people talk de same way we does?"

"No, Jim; you couldn't understand a word they said"not a single word."

"Well, now, I be ding-busted! How do dat come?"

"I don't know; but it's so. I got some of their jabber out of a book. S'pose a man was to come to you and say Polly-voo-franzy"what would you think?"

jabber - farfullar

"I wouldn'think nuff'n; I'd take en bust him over de head"dat is, if he warn't white. I wouldn't 'low no nigger to call me dat."

nuff - Suficiente

"Shucks, it ain't calling you anything. It's only saying, do you know how to talk French?"

"Well, den, why couldn't he say it?"

"Why, he is a-saying it. That's a Frenchman's way of saying it."

"Well, it's a blame ridicklous way, en I doan'want to hear no mo''bout it. Dey ain'no sense in it."

ridicklous - Ridículo

"Looky here, Jim; does a cat talk like we do?"

"No, a cat don't."

"Well, does a cow?"

"No, a cow don't, nuther."

"Does a cat talk like a cow, or a cow talk like a cat?"

"No, dey don't."

"It's natural and right for 'em to talk different from each other, ain't it?"

"'Course."

"And ain't it natural and right for a cat and a cow to talk different from us?"

"Why, mos'sholy it is."

"Well, then, why ain't it natural and right for a Frenchman to talk different from us? You answer me that."

"Is a cat a man, Huck?"

"No."

"Well, den, dey ain't no sense in a cat talkin'like a man. Is a cow a man?"er is a cow a cat?"

"No, she ain't either of them."

"Well, den, she ain't got no business to talk like either one er the yuther of 'em. Is a Frenchman a man?"

"Yes."

"Well, den! Dad blame it, why doan'he talk like a man? You answer me dat!"

I see it warn't no use wasting words"you can't learn a nigger to argue. So I quit.

wasting - Desperdiciar; (wast) Desperdiciar

CHAPTER XV.

We judged that three nights more would fetch us to Cairo, at the bottom of Illinois, where the Ohio River comes in, and that was what we was after. We would sell the raft and get on a steamboat and go way up the Ohio amongst the free States, and then be out of trouble.

Cairo - el

Well, the second night a fog begun to come on, and we made for a tow-head to tie to, for it wouldn't do to try to run in a fog; but when I paddled ahead in the canoe, with the line to make fast, there warn't anything but little saplings to tie to. I passed the line around one of them right on the edge of the cut bank, but there was a stiff current, and the raft come booming down so lively she tore it out by the roots and away she went. I see the fog closing down, and it made me so sick and scared I couldn't budge for most a half a minute it seemed to me"and then there warn't no raft in sight; you couldn't see twenty yards.

Fog - niebla

make fast - hacer algo rápido

saplings - Arbolitos

lively - animado

I jumped into the canoe and run back to the stern, and grabbed the paddle and set her back a stroke. But she didn't come. I was in such a hurry I hadn't untied her. I got up and tried to untie her, but I was so excited my hands shook so I couldn't hardly do anything with them.

stroke - ictus; golpe

untied - sin ataduras; desatar, desamarrar, desligar, soltar, desatarse

As soon as I got started I took out after the raft, hot and heavy, right down the tow-head. That was all right as far as it went, but the tow-head warn't sixty yards long, and the minute I flew by the foot of it I shot out into the solid white fog, and hadn't no more idea which way I was going than a dead man.

Thinks I, it won't do to paddle; first I know I'll run into the bank or a tow-head or something; I got to set still and float, and yet it's mighty fidgety business to have to hold your hands still at such a time. I whooped and listened. Away down there somewheres I hears a small whoop, and up comes my spirits. I went tearing after it, listening sharp to hear it again.

whooped - golpeado; grito/alarido (de alegría)

spirits - espíritus; espíritu, alma, onda, alcohol, bebida espirituosa

The next time it come, I see I warn't heading for it, but heading away to the right of it. And the next time I was heading away to the left of it"and not gaining on it much either, for I was flying around, this way and that and t'other, but it was going straight ahead all the time.

gaining - Ganando; (gain) Ganando

I did wish the fool would think to beat a tin pan, and beat it all the time, but he never did, and it was the still places between the whoops that was making the trouble for me. Well, I fought along, and directly I hears the whoop behind me. I was tangled good now. That was somebody else's whoop, or else I was turned around.

whoops - whoops; grito/alarido (de alegría)

I throwed the paddle down. I heard the whoop again; it was behind me yet, but in a different place; it kept coming, and kept changing its place, and I kept answering, till by-and-by it was in front of me again, and I knowed the current had swung the canoe's head down-stream, and I was all right if that was Jim and not some other raftsman hollering.

whoop - guau; grito/alarido (de alegría)

I couldn't tell nothing about voices in a fog, for nothing don't look natural nor sound natural in a fog.

The whooping went on, and in about a minute I come a-booming down on a cut bank with smoky ghosts of big trees on it, and the current throwed me off to the left and shot by, amongst a lot of snags that fairly roared, the currrent was tearing by them so swift.

ghosts - fantasmas; fantasma, espectro, espíritu, aparecido

snags - problemas; pega, problema, inconveniente

currrent - actual

In another second or two it was solid white and still again. I set perfectly still then, listening to my heart thump, and I reckon I didn't draw a breath while it thumped a hundred.

perfectly - perfectamente

thumped - golpeado; golpe sordo, ruido sordo, golpear, azotar

I just give up then. I knowed what the matter was. That cut bank was an island, and Jim had gone down t'other side of it. It warn't no tow-head that you could float by in ten minutes. It had the big timber of a regular island; it might be five or six miles long and more than half a mile wide.

I kept quiet, with my ears cocked, about fifteen minutes, I reckon. I was floating along, of course, four or five miles an hour; but you don't ever think of that. No, you feel like you are laying dead still on the water; and if a little glimpse of a snag slips by you don't think to yourself how fast you're going, but you catch your breath and think, my!

cocked - agachado; gallo, macho

slips - resbalones; resbalar

how that snag's tearing along. If you think it ain't dismal and lonesome out in a fog that way by yourself in the night, you try it once"you'll see.

Next, for about a half an hour, I whoops now and then; at last I hears the answer a long ways off, and tries to follow it, but I couldn't do it, and directly I judged I'd got into a nest of tow-heads, for I had little dim glimpses of them on both sides of me"sometimes just a narrow channel between, and some that I couldn't see I knowed was there because I'd hear the wash of the current against the old dead brush and trash that hung over the banks.

nest - nido

glimpses - atisbos; atisbo, entrever, atisbar, vislumbrar, ojear

trash - basura, caneca, basura, chusma, papelera

Well, I warn't long loosing the whoops down amongst the tow-heads; and I only tried to chase them a little while, anyway, because it was worse than chasing a Jack-o'-lantern. You never knowed a sound dodge around so, and swap places so quick and so much.

loosing - perdiendo; flojo

chase - persecución; perseguir

dodge around - esquivar

swap - Intercambio

I had to claw away from the bank pretty lively four or five times, to keep from knocking the islands out of the river; and so I judged the raft must be butting into the bank every now and then, or else it would get further ahead and clear out of hearing"it was floating a little faster than what I was.

claw - garra

clear out - retirar(se); salir; vaciar

Well, I seemed to be in the open river again by-and-by, but I couldn't hear no sign of a whoop nowheres. I reckoned Jim had fetched up on a snag, maybe, and it was all up with him. I was good and tired, so I laid down in the canoe and said I wouldn't bother no more. I didn't want to go to sleep, of course; but I was so sleepy I couldn't help it; so I thought I would take jest one little cat-nap.

But I reckon it was more than a cat-nap, for when I waked up the stars was shining bright, the fog was all gone, and I was spinning down a big bend stern first. First I didn't know where I was; I thought I was dreaming; and when things began to come back to me they seemed to come up dim out of last week.

dim out - atenuar, oscurecer

It was a monstrous big river here, with the tallest and the thickest kind of timber on both banks; just a solid wall, as well as I could see by the stars. I looked away down-stream, and seen a black speck on the water. I took after it; but when I got to it it warn't nothing but a couple of sawlogs made fast together. Then I see another speck, and chased that; then another, and this time I was right. It was the raft.

took after - parecerse a

sawlogs - Serrucho

When I got to it Jim was setting there with his head down between his knees, asleep, with his right arm hanging over the steering-oar. The other oar was smashed off, and the raft was littered up with leaves and branches and dirt. So she'd had a rough time.

setting - configuración, ajustes, poniente; (set); configuración, ajustes

hanging over - colgar sobre

littered - limpiado; litera, artolas, camada, cama, lecho, detritus

I made fast and laid Down Under Jim's nose on the raft, and began to gap, and stretch my fists out against Jim, and says:

Down Under - en, a Australia, Oceanía

fists - punos; puno

"Hello, Jim, have I been asleep? Why didn't you stir me up?"

"Goodness gracious, is dat you, Huck? En you ain'dead"you ain'drownded"you's back agin? It's too good for true, honey, it's too good for true. Lemme look at you chile, lemme feel o'you. No, you ain'dead! you's back agin, 'live en soun', jis de same ole Huck"de same ole Huck, thanks to goodness!"

"What's the matter with you, Jim? You been a-drinking?"

"Drinkin'? Has I ben a-drinkin'? Has I had a chance to be a-drinkin'?"

drinkin - Bebiendo

"Well, then, what makes you talk so wild?"

"How does I talk wild?"

"How? Why, hain't you been talking about my coming back, and all that stuff, as if I'd been gone away?"

gone away - irse, pasar

"Huck"Huck Finn, you look me in de eye; look me in de eye. Hain't you ben gone away?"

"Gone away? Why, what in the nation do you mean? I hain't been gone anywheres. Where would I go to?"

"Well, looky here, boss, dey's sumf'n wrong, dey is. Is I me, or who is I? Is I heah, or whah is I? Now dat's what I wants to know."

"Well, I think you're here, plain enough, but I think you're a tangle-headed old fool, Jim."

tangle - desorden, marana, enredo

"I is, is I? Well, you answer me dis: Didn't you tote out de line in de canoe fer to make fas'to de tow-head?"

tote - ote; acarrear

fas - fas; fa

"No, I didn't. What tow-head? I hain't see no tow-head."

"You hain't seen no tow-head? Looky here, didn't de line pull loose en de raf'go a-hummin'down de river, en leave you en de canoe behine in de fog?"

behine - ehine

"What fog?"

"Why, de fog!"de fog dat's been aroun'all night. En didn't you whoop, en didn't I whoop, tell we got mix'up in de islands en one un us got los'en t'other one was jis'as good as los', 'kase he didn'know whah he wuz? En didn't I bust up agin a lot er dem islands en have a turrible time en mos'git drownded? Now ain'dat so, boss"ain't it so? You answer me dat."

didn't I - ?no es así?

Mix - mezclar

"Well, this is too many for me, Jim. I hain't seen no fog, nor no islands, nor no troubles, nor nothing. I been setting here talking with you all night till you went to sleep about ten minutes ago, and I reckon I done the same. You couldn't a got drunk in that time, so of course you've been dreaming."

"Dad fetch it, how is I gwyne to dream all dat in ten minutes?"

"Well, hang it all, you did dream it, because there didn't any of it happen."

"But, Huck, it's all jis'as plain to me as""

"It don't make no difference how plain it is; there ain't nothing in it. I know, because I've been here all the time."

Jim didn't say nothing for about five minutes, but set there studying over it. Then he says:

"Well, den, I reck'n I did dream it, Huck; but dog my cats ef it ain't de powerfullest dream I ever see. En I hain't ever had no dream b'fo'dat's tired me like dis one."

powerfullest - el más poderoso

"Oh, well, that's all right, because a dream does tire a body like everything sometimes. But this one was a staving dream; tell me all about it, Jim."

tire - neumático

staving - escalada; duela, estrofa, pentagrama

So Jim went to work and told me the whole thing right through, just as it happened, only he painted it up considerable. Then he said he must start in and "'terpret" it, because it was sent for a warning. He said the first tow-head stood for a man that would try to do us some good, but the current was another man that would get us away from him. The whoops was warnings that would come to us every now and then, and if we didn't try hard to make out to understand them they'd just take us into bad luck, 'stead of keeping us out of it.

warnings - advertencias; advertencia, aviso, precaución, cuidado

try hard - esforzarse

The lot of tow-heads was troubles we was going to get into with quarrelsome people and all kinds of mean folks, but if we minded our business and didn't talk back and aggravate them, we would pull through and get out of the fog and into the big clear river, which was the free States, and wouldn't have no more trouble.

quarrelsome - endenciero; rijoso

aggravate - agravar, empeorar, irritar, exasperar, sublevar

pull through - superar, atravesar, recuperarse

It had clouded up pretty dark just after I got on to the raft, but it was clearing up again now.

clearing up - limpiar; despejar(se); aclarar

"Oh, well, that's all interpreted well enough as far as it goes, Jim," I says; "but what does these things stand for?"

interpreted - interpretado; explicar, exponer, interpretar

It was the leaves and rubbish on the raft and the smashed oar. You could see them first-rate now.

Jim looked at the trash, and then looked at me, and back at the trash again. He had got the dream fixed so strong in his head that he couldn't seem to shake it loose and get the facts back into its place again right away. But when he did get the thing straightened around he looked at me steady without ever smiling, and says:

straightened - nderezado; estirar (hair), desencorvar, destorcer, enderezar

"What do dey stan'for? I'se gwyne to tell you. When I got all wore out wid work, en wid de callin'for you, en went to sleep, my heart wuz mos'broke bekase you wuz los', en I didn'k'yer no'mo'what become er me en de raf'. En when I wake up en fine you back agin, all safe en soun', de tears come, en I could a got down on my knees en kiss yo'foot, I's so thankful. En all you wuz thinkin''bout wuz how you could make a fool uv ole Jim wid a lie.

kiss - besar

thinkin - Pensando

Dat truck dah is trash; en trash is what people is dat puts dirt on de head er dey fren's en makes 'em ashamed."

Then he got up slow and walked to the wigwam, and went in there without saying anything but that. But that was enough. It made me feel so mean I could almost kissed his foot to get him to take it back.

It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger; but I done it, and I warn't ever sorry for it afterwards, neither. I didn't do him no more mean tricks, and I wouldn't done that one if I'd a knowed it would make him feel that way.

humble - humilde

tricks - trucos; truco, artimana, enganifa, treta

CHAPTER XVI.

We slept most all day, and started out at night, a little ways behind a monstrous long raft that was as long going by as a procession. She had four long sweeps at each end, so we judged she carried as many as thirty men, likely.

procession - procesión

sweeps - barridos; barrer, peinar

She had five big wigwams aboard, wide apart, and an open camp fire in the middle, and a tall flag-pole at each end. There was a power of style about her. It amounted to something being a raftsman on such a craft as that.

wigwams - wigwams; toldo

flag - bandera

pole - pértiga; polo

craft - artesanía; pericia, oficio, nave, labrar, hacer a mano

We went drifting down into a big bend, and the night clouded up and got hot. The river was very wide, and was walled with solid timber on both sides; you couldn't see a break in it hardly ever, or a light. We talked about Cairo, and wondered whether we would know it when we got to it. I said likely we wouldn't, because I had heard say there warn't but about a dozen houses there, and if they didn't happen to have them lit up, how was we going to know we was passing a town? Jim said if the two big rivers joined together there, that would show.

But I said maybe we might think we was passing the foot of an island and coming into the same old river again. That disturbed Jim"and me too. So the question was, what to do? I said, paddle ashore the first time a light showed, and tell them pap was behind, coming along with a trading-scow, and was a green hand at the business, and wanted to know how far it was to Cairo. Jim thought it was a good idea, so we took a smoke on it and waited.

disturbed - molesto; perturbar, molestar

There warn't nothing to do now but to look out sharp for the town, and not pass it without seeing it. He said he'd be mighty sure to see it, because he'd be a free man the minute he seen it, but if he missed it he'd be in a slave country again and no more show for freedom. Every little while he jumps up and says:

slave - esclavo, esclava, checkesclava

freedom - libertad

jumps up - salta

"Dah she is?"

But it warn't. It was Jack-o'-lanterns, or lightning bugs; so he set down again, and went to watching, same as before. Jim said it made him all over trembly and feverish to be so close to freedom. Well, I can tell you it made me all over trembly and feverish, too, to hear him, because I begun to get it through my head that he was most free"and who was to blame for it? Why, me. I couldn't get that out of my conscience, no how nor no way. It got to troubling me so I couldn't rest; I couldn't stay still in one place. It hadn't ever come home to me before, what this thing was that I was doing. But now it did; and it stayed with me, and scorched me more and more. I tried to make out to myself that I warn't to blame, because I didn't run Jim off from his rightful owner; but it warn't no use, conscience up and says, every time, "But you knowed he was running for his freedom, and you could a paddled ashore and told somebody.

lanterns - linternas; farol, linterna

Bugs - bichos; chinche, bicho, error, fallo, defecto, bug, manía

trembly - tembloroso

feverish - fiebre; febril

conscience - conciencia

scorched - quemado; chamuscar

rightful - derecho; legítimo

That was so"I couldn't get around that noway. That was where it pinched. Conscience says to me, "What had poor Miss Watson done to you that you could see her nigger go off right under your eyes and never say one single word? What did that poor old woman do to you that you could treat her so mean? Why, she tried to learn you your book, she tried to learn you your manners, she tried to be good to you every way she knowed how. That's what she done."

noway - De ninguna manera

pinched - pellizcado; pellizcar, repizcar, afanar, chorizar, pellizco

treat - tratar, negociar, rogar, invitar, convidar, sorpresa

I got to feeling so mean and so miserable I most wished I was dead. I fidgeted up and down the raft, abusing myself to myself, and Jim was fidgeting up and down past me. We neither of us could keep still. Every time he danced around and says, "Dah's Cairo!" it went through me like a shot, and I thought if it was Cairo I reckoned I would die of miserableness.

miserable - miserable

fidgeted - inquieta; revolverse

abusing - abusando; Abuso

fidgeting - inquietarse; revolverse

It most froze me to hear such talk. He wouldn't ever dared to talk such talk in his life before. Just see what a difference it made in him the minute he judged he was about free. It was according to the old saying, "Give a nigger an inch and he'll take an ell." Thinks I, this is what comes of my not thinking.

dared - se atrevió; atraverse, osar

Here was this nigger, which I had as good as helped to run away, coming right out flat-footed and saying he would steal his children"children that belonged to a man I didn't even know; a man that hadn't ever done me no harm.

I was sorry to hear Jim say that, it was such a lowering of him. My conscience got to stirring me up hotter than ever, until at last I says to it, "Let up on me"it ain't too late yet"I'll paddle ashore at the first light and tell." I felt easy and happy and light as a feather right off. All my troubles was gone. I went to looking out sharp for a light, and sort of singing to myself. By-and-by one showed. Jim sings out:

lowering - Bajando; (lower) Bajando

feather - pluma

"We's safe, Huck, we's safe! jump up and crack yo'heels! Dat's de good ole Cairo at las', I jis knows it!"

jump up - Saltar arriba

crack - rajarse, resquebrajarse

I says:

"I'll take the canoe and go and see, Jim. It mightn't be, you know."

mightn - podría

He jumped and got the canoe ready, and put his old coat in the bottom for me to set on, and give me the paddle; and as I shoved off, he says:

"Pooty soon I'll be a-shout'n'for joy, en I'll say, it's all on accounts o'Huck; I's a free man, en I couldn't ever ben free ef it hadn'ben for Huck; Huck done it. Jim won't ever forgit you, Huck; you's de bes'fren'Jim's ever had; en you's de only fren'ole Jim's got now."

accounts - uentas; cuenta

I was paddling off, all in a sweat to tell on him; but when he says this, it seemed to kind of take the tuck all out of me. I went along slow then, and I warn't right down certain whether I was glad I started or whether I warn't. When I was fifty yards off, Jim says:

paddling - Remando; (paddle) Remando

"Dah you goes, de ole true Huck; de on'y white genlman dat ever kep'his promise to ole Jim."

Well, I just felt sick. But I says, I got to do it"I can't get out of it. Right then along comes a skiff with two men in it with guns, and they stopped and I stopped. One of them says:

"What's that yonder?"

"A piece of a raft," I says.

"Do you belong on it?"

"Yes, sir."

"Any men on it?"

"Only one, sir."

"Well, there's five niggers run off to-night up yonder, above the head of the bend. Is your man white or black?"

I didn't answer up prompt. I tried to, but the words wouldn't come. I tried for a second or two to brace up and out with it, but I warn't man enough"hadn't the spunk of a rabbit. I see I was weakening; so I just give up trying, and up and says:

brace up - animarse

spunk - coraje; agallas, guaperas, leche

"He's white."

"I reckon we'll go and see for ourselves."

"I wish you would," says I, "because it's pap that's there, and maybe you'd help me tow the raft ashore where the light is. He's sick"and so is mam and Mary Ann."

"Oh, the devil! we're in a hurry, boy. But I s'pose we've got to. Come, buckle to your paddle, and let's get along."

buckle - hebilla

I buckled to my paddle and they laid to their oars. When we had made a stroke or two, I says:

buckled - doblado; hebilla

"Pap'll be mighty much obleeged to you, I can tell you. Everybody goes away when I want them to help me tow the raft ashore, and I can't do it by myself."

obleeged - Oblegado

I can't do it - No puedo hacerlo

"Well, that's infernal mean. Odd, too. Say, boy, what's the matter with your father?"

odd - raro; guacho, desparejado, desemparejado, suelto, extrano

"It's the"a"the"well, it ain't anything much."

They stopped pulling. It warn't but a mighty little ways to the raft now. One says:

"Boy, that's a lie. What is the matter with your pap? Answer up square now, and it'll be the better for you."

"I will, sir, I will, honest"but don't leave us, please. It's the"the"Gentlemen, if you'll only pull ahead, and let me heave you the headline, you won't have to come a-near the raft"please do."

headline - titular

"Set her back, John, set her back!" says one. They backed water. "keep away, boy"keep to looard. Confound it, I just expect the wind has blowed it to us. Your pap's got the small-pox, and you know it precious well. Why didn't you come out and say so? Do you want to spread it all over?"

keep away - mantenerse alejado

Confound - confundir, empeorar

precious - preciosos; precioso

"Well," says I, a-blubbering, "I've told everybody before, and they just went away and left us."

"Poor devil, there's something in that. We are right down sorry for you, but we"well, hang it, we don't want the small-pox, you see. look here, I'll tell you what to do. Don't you try to land by yourself, or you'll smash everything to pieces. You float along down about twenty miles, and you'll come to a town on the left-hand side of the river. It will be long after sun-up then, and when you ask for help you tell them your folks are all down with chills and fever. Don't be a fool again, and let people guess what is the matter.

look here - mira aquí

smash - estrellar, destrozar, golpear, machucar

chills - escalofríos; frío

fever - fiebre, calentura

Now we're trying to do you a kindness; so you just put twenty miles between us, that's a good boy. It wouldn't do any good to land yonder where the light is"it's only a wood-yard. Say, I reckon your father's poor, and I'm bound to say he's in pretty hard luck. Here, I'll put a twenty-dollar gold piece on this board, and you get it when it floats by. I feel mighty mean to leave you; but my kingdom! it won't do to fool with small-pox, don't you see?"

kindness - amabilidad, bondad

I'm bound to say - Tengo que decir

floats - flotadores; flotar, carroza

"Hold on, Parker," says the other man, "here's a twenty to put on the board for me. Good-bye, boy; you do as Mr. Parker told you, and you'll be all right."

Good-bye - (Good-bye) Adiós

"That's so, my boy"good-bye, good-bye. If you see any runaway niggers you get help and nab them, and you can make some money by it."

nab - pillar

"Good-bye, sir," says I; "I won't let no runaway niggers get by me if I can help it."

They went off and I got aboard the raft, feeling bad and low, because I knowed very well I had done wrong, and I see it warn't no use for me to try to learn to do right; a body that don't get started right when he's little ain't got no show"when the pinch comes there ain't nothing to back him up and keep him to his work, and so he gets beat. Then I thought a minute, and says to myself, hold on; s'pose you'd a done right and give Jim up, would you felt better than what you do now?

pinch - pellizcar, repizcar, afanar, chorizar, pellizco

No, says I, I'd feel bad"I'd feel just the same way I do now. Well, then, says I, what's the use you learning to do right when it's troublesome to do right and ain't no trouble to do wrong, and the wages is just the same? I was stuck. I couldn't answer that. So I reckoned I wouldn't bother no more about it, but after this always do whichever come handiest at the time.

troublesome - problemático, prolijo

wages - salario; hacer (la guerra), librar, dar

handiest - más a mano; a mano, cercano

I went into the wigwam; Jim warn't there. I looked all around; he warn't anywhere. I says:

"Jim!"

"Here I is, Huck. Is dey out o'sight yit? Don't talk loud."

He was in the river under the stern oar, with just his nose out. I told him they were out of sight, so he come aboard. He says:

"I was a-listenin'to all de talk, en I slips into de river en was gwyne to shove for sho'if dey come aboard. Den I was gwyne to swim to de raf'agin when dey was gone. But lawsy, how you did fool 'em, Huck! Dat wuz de smartes'dodge! I tell you, chile, I'spec it save'ole Jim"ole Jim ain't going to forgit you for dat, honey."

listenin - Escuchas

lawsy - Lawy

Dodge - evadir, esquivar, capear

Then we talked about the money. It was a pretty good raise"twenty dollars apiece. Jim said we could take deck passage on a steamboat now, and the money would last us as far as we wanted to go in the free States. He said twenty mile more warn't far for the raft to go, but he wished we was already there.

Towards daybreak we tied up, and Jim was mighty particular about hiding the raft good. Then he worked all day fixing things in bundles, and getting all ready to quit rafting.

bundles - paquetes; haz, atado, fajo, atar, liar

Rafting - descenso de ríos; (raft); descenso de ríos

That night about ten we hove in sight of the lights of a town away down in a left-hand bend.

I went off in the canoe to ask about it. Pretty soon I found a man out in the river with a skiff, setting a trot-line. I ranged up and says:

ranged - corrió; sierra, cordillera, hornillo, estufa, escala, gama

"Mister, is that town Cairo?"

"Cairo? no. You must be a blame'fool."

"What town is it, mister?"

"If you want to know, go and find out. If you stay here botherin'around me for about a half a minute longer you'll get something you won't want."

botherin - Molestando

I paddled to the raft. Jim was awful disappointed, but I said never mind, Cairo would be the next place, I reckoned.

We passed another town before daylight, and I was going out again; but it was high ground, so I didn't go. No high ground about Cairo, Jim said. I had forgot it. We laid up for the day on a tow-head tolerable close to the left-hand bank. I begun to suspicion something. So did Jim. I says:

"Maybe we went by Cairo in the fog that night."

He says:

"Doan'le's talk about it, Huck. Po'niggers can't have no luck. I awluz 'spected dat rattlesnake-skin warn't done wid its work."

spected - Especulado

"I wish I'd never seen that snake-skin, Jim"I do wish I'd never laid eyes on it."

"It ain't yo'fault, Huck; you didn'know. Don't you blame yo'self 'bout it."

When it was daylight, here was the clear Ohio water inshore, sure enough, and outside was the old regular Muddy! So it was all up with Cairo.

inshore - en la costa; acostado

Muddy - Fango

We talked it all over. It wouldn't do to take to the shore; we couldn't take the raft up the stream, of course. There warn't no way but to wait for dark, and start back in the canoe and take the chances. So we slept all day amongst the cottonwood thicket, so as to be fresh for the work, and when we went back to the raft about dark the canoe was gone!

We didn't say a word for a good while. There warn't anything to say. We both knowed well enough it was some more work of the rattlesnake-skin; so what was the use to talk about it? It would only look like we was finding fault, and that would be bound to fetch more bad luck"and keep on fetching it, too, till we knowed enough to keep still.

fetching - buscando; ir por, ir a buscar, traer

By-and-by we talked about what we better do, and found there warn't no way but just to go along down with the raft till we got a chance to buy a canoe to go back in. We warn't going to borrow it when there warn't anybody around, the way pap would do, for that might set people after us.

So we shoved out after dark on the raft.

Anybody that don't believe yet that it's foolishness to handle a snake-skin, after all that that snake-skin done for us, will believe it now if they read on and see what more it done for us.

The place to buy canoes is off of rafts laying up at shore. But we didn't see no rafts laying up; so we went along during three hours and more. Well, the night got gray and ruther thick, which is the next meanest thing to fog. You can't tell the shape of the river, and you can't see no distance. It got to be very late and still, and then along comes a steamboat up the river. We lit the lantern, and judged she would see it.

canoes - piraguas; canoa

Up-stream boats didn't generly come close to us; they go out and follow the bars and hunt for easy water under the reefs; but nights like this they bull right up the channel against the whole river.

reefs - rrecifes; arrecife

Bull - toro

We could hear her pounding along, but we didn't see her good till she was close. She aimed right for us. Often they do that and try to see how close they can come without touching; sometimes the wheel bites off a sweep, and then the pilot sticks his head out and laughs, and thinks he's mighty smart.

aimed - dirigido; apuntar

bites - mordiscos; morder, picar, mordida, mordedura, mordisco, picadura

sweep - barrer, peinar

sticks - bastones; clavar

Well, here she comes, and we said she was going to try and shave us; but she didn't seem to be sheering off a bit. She was a big one, and she was coming in a hurry, too, looking like a black cloud with rows of glow-worms around it; but all of a sudden she bulged out, big and scary, with a long row of wide-open furnace doors shining like red-hot teeth, and her monstrous bows and guards hanging right over us. There was a yell at us, and a jingling of bells to stop the engines, a powwow of cussing, and whistling of steam"and as Jim went overboard on one side and I on the other, she come smashing straight through the raft.

shave - afeitarse

sheering - escisión; puro, absoluto

rows - filas; hilera, fila

glow - resplandor; fulgir, fulgurar, iluminar, brillar

worms - lombrices; gusano, lombriz, alimana, rata

bulged - abultado; bulto, abultamiento, protuberancia, abultar

furnace - horno, caldera, calefacción

bows - arcos; (bow) arcos

guards - guardias; guarda, guardia, guardés, guarda, tapador, bloque

yell - gritar; grito, alarido

jingling - tintineo, retintín, sintonía

bells - campanas; campana

whistling - Silbando; (whistle); silbato, pito, chifle, pitido

smashing - romper; estrellar, destrozar, golpear, machucar

straight through - directamente por

I dived"and I aimed to find the bottom, too, for a thirty-foot wheel had got to go over me, and I wanted it to have plenty of room. I could always stay under water a minute; this time I reckon I stayed under a minute and a half. Then I bounced for the top in a hurry, for I was nearly busting. I popped out to my armpits and blowed the water out of my nose, and puffed a bit.

dived - buceó; zambullirse, tirarse de cabeza

busting - reventando; busto, pecho

armpits - las axilas; axila, sobaco

puffed - inflado; soplo, racha, ráfaga; bocanada

Of course there was a booming current; and of course that boat started her engines again ten seconds after she stopped them, for they never cared much for raftsmen; so now she was churning along up the river, out of sight in the thick weather, though I could hear her.

churning - atido; (churn); batir, mantequera

I sung out for Jim about a dozen times, but I didn't get any answer; so I grabbed a plank that touched me while I was "treading water," and struck out for shore, shoving it ahead of me. But I made out to see that the drift of the current was towards the left-hand shore, which meant that I was in a crossing; so I changed off and went that way.

treading - Pisando; (tread) Pisando

shoving - empujones; empujar

It was one of these long, slanting, two-mile crossings; so I was a good long time in getting over. I made a safe landing, and clumb up the bank. I couldn't see but a little ways, but I went poking along over rough ground for a quarter of a mile or more, and then I run across a big old-fashioned double log-house before I noticed it.

slanting - inclinado; inclinación

crossings - cruces; cruce, crucero, edestrian

getting over - superar, recuperarse

poking - pinchando; meter

old-fashioned - (old-fashioned) anticuado

I was going to rush by and get away, but a lot of dogs jumped out and went to howling and barking at me, and I knowed better than to move another peg.

howling - aullando; (howl); aullido, aullar, ganir

barking at - ladrando a

CHAPTER XVII.

In about a minute somebody spoke out of a window without putting his head out, and says:

"Be done, boys! Who's there?"

I says:

"It's me."

It's me - Soy yo

"Who's me?"

"George Jackson, sir."

"What do you want?"

"I don't want nothing, sir. I only want to go along by, but the dogs won't let me."

"What are you prowling around here this time of night for"hey?"

"I warn't prowling around, sir, I fell overboard off of the steamboat."

"Oh, you did, did you? Strike a light there, somebody. What did you say your name was?"

"George Jackson, sir. I'm only a boy."

"Look here, if you're telling the truth you needn't be afraid"nobody'll hurt you. But don't try to budge; stand right where you are. Rouse out Bob and Tom, some of you, and fetch the guns. George Jackson, is there anybody with you?"

rouse - revivir; despertar

"No, sir, nobody."

I heard the people stirring around in the house now, and see a light. The man sung out:

"Snatch that light away, Betsy, you old fool"ain't you got any sense? Put it on the floor behind the front door. Bob, if you and Tom are ready, take your places."

snatch - robar; agarrar, arrebatar, arrancada, arranque

"All ready."

"Now, George Jackson, do you know the Shepherdsons?"

"No, sir; I never heard of them."

"Well, that may be so, and it mayn't. Now, all ready. Step forward, George Jackson. And mind, don't you hurry"come mighty slow. If there's anybody with you, let him keep back"if he shows himself he'll be shot. Come along now. Come slow; push the door open yourself"just enough to squeeze in, d'you hear?"

mayn - No

squeeze - exprimir, apretar, apretujar, apuro, crisis, apretón

I didn't hurry; I couldn't if I'd a wanted to. I took one slow step at a time and there warn't a sound, only I thought I could hear my heart. The dogs were as still as the humans, but they followed a little behind me. When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking and unbarring and unbolting. I put my hand on the door and pushed it a little and a little more till somebody said, "There, that's enough"put your head in.

doorsteps - a las puertas; umbral

unlocking - desbloqueo; abrir, abrir con llave, desatrancar, desbloquear

unbarring - desbloqueo; desatrancar

I done it, but I judged they would take it off.

The candle was on the floor, and there they all was, looking at me, and me at them, for about a quarter of a minute: Three big men with guns pointed at me, which made me wince, I tell you; the oldest, gray and about sixty, the other two thirty or more"all of them fine and handsome"and the sweetest old gray-headed lady, and back of her two young women which I couldn't see right well. The old gentleman says:

handsome - apuesto, guapo, de buen parecer, lindo

gentleman - caballero, senores

"There; I reckon it's all right. Come in."

As soon as I was in the old gentleman he locked the door and barred it and bolted it, and told the young men to come in with their guns, and they all went in a big parlor that had a new rag carpet on the floor, and got together in a corner that was out of the range of the front windows"there warn't none on the side. They held the candle, and took a good look at me, and all said, "Why, he ain't a Shepherdson"no, there ain't any Shepherdson about him.

bolted - atornillado; pestillo

parlor - salón; sala, sala de estar

range - rango; sierra, cordillera, hornillo, estufa, escala, gama

Then the old man said he hoped I wouldn't mind being searched for arms, because he didn't mean no harm by it"it was only to make sure. So he didn't pry into my pockets, but only felt outside with his hands, and said it was all right. He told me to make myself easy and at home, and tell all about myself; but the old lady says:

pry - hurgar; fisgonear, curiosear

"Why, bless you, Saul, the poor thing's as wet as he can be; and don't you reckon it may be he's hungry?"

Saul - Saúl, Saulo

"True for you, Rachel"I forgot."

So the old lady says:

"Betsy" (this was a nigger woman), "you fly around and get him something to eat as quick as you can, poor thing; and one of you girls go and wake up Buck and tell him"oh, here he is himself. Buck, take this little stranger and get the wet clothes off from him and dress him up in some of yours that's dry."

Buck - macho

Buck looked about as old as me"thirteen or fourteen or along there, though he was a little bigger than me. He hadn't on anything but a shirt, and he was very frowzy-headed. He came in gaping and digging one fist into his eyes, and he was dragging a gun along with the other one. He says:

digging - Cavando; (dig) Cavando

"Ain't they no Shepherdsons around?"

They said, no, 'twas a false alarm.

alarm - alarma, rebato, despertador, alarma, tocar a rebato

"Well," he says, "if they'd a ben some, I reckon I'd a got one."

They all laughed, and Bob says:

"Why, Buck, they might have scalped us all, you've been so slow in coming."

scalped - le arrancaron la cabellera; cuero cabelludo, descabellar

"Well, nobody come after me, and it ain't right I'm always kept down; I don't get no show."

"Never mind, Buck, my boy," says the old man, "you'll have show enough, all in good time, don't you fret about that. Go 'long with you now, and do as your mother told you."

fret - traste; preocuparse

When we got up-stairs to his room he got me a coarse shirt and a roundabout and pants of his, and I put them on. While I was at it he asked me what my name was, but before I could tell him he started to tell me about a bluejay and a young rabbit he had catched in the woods day before yesterday, and he asked me where Moses was when the candle went out. I said I didn't know; I hadn't heard about it before, no way.

roundabout - rotonda, glorieta, redoma, tiovivo, desvío

bluejay - Azul

"Well, guess," he says.

"How'm I going to guess," says I, "when I never heard tell of it before?"

"But you can guess, can't you? It's just as easy."

"Which candle?" I says.

"Why, any candle," he says.

"I don't know where he was," says I; "where was he?"

"Why, he was in the dark! That's where he was!"

"Well, if you knowed where he was, what did you ask me for?"

"Why, blame it, it's a riddle, don't you see? Say, how long are you going to stay here? You got to stay always. We can just have booming times"they don't have no school now. Do you own a dog? I've got a dog"and he'll go in the river and bring out chips that you throw in. Do you like to comb up Sundays, and all that kind of foolishness? You bet I don't, but ma she makes me. Confound these ole britches!

riddle - enigma; adivinanza, acertijo

I reckon I'd better put 'em on, but I'd ruther not, it's so warm. Are you all ready? All right. Come along, old hoss."

Cold corn-pone, cold corn-beef, butter and buttermilk"that is what they had for me down there, and there ain't nothing better that ever I've come across yet. Buck and his ma and all of them smoked cob pipes, except the nigger woman, which was gone, and the two young women. They all smoked and talked, and I eat and talked. The young women had quilts around them, and their hair down their backs. They all asked me questions, and I told them how pap and me and all the family was living on a little farm down at the bottom of Arkansaw, and my sister Mary Ann run off and got married and never was heard of no more, and Bill went to hunt them and he warn't heard of no more, and Tom and Mort died, and then there warn't nobody but just me and pap left, and he was just trimmed down to nothing, on account of his troubles; so when he died I took what there was left, because the farm didn't belong to us, and started up the river, deck passage, and fell overboard; and that was how I come to be here.

buttermilk - suero de leche; suero de mantequilla

cob - coba; Mazorca

pipes - tuberías; caramillo, flauta ), tubo de órgano, tubería, tubo

quilts - dredones; colcha, edredón, acolchar

trimmed - recortado; recortar, orlar, ribetear

So they said I could have a home there as long as I wanted it. Then it was most daylight and everybody went to bed, and I went to bed with Buck, and when I waked up in the morning, drat it all, I had forgot what my name was. So I laid there about an hour trying to think, and when Buck waked up I says:

Drat - mierda; maldecir, eh

"Can you spell, Buck?"

"Yes," he says.

"I bet you can't spell my name," says I.

"I bet you what you dare I can," says he.

dare - te atreves; atraverse, osar

"All right," says I, "go ahead."

"G-e-o-r-g-e J-a-x-o-n"there now," he says.

"Well," says I, "you done it, but I didn't think you could. It ain't no slouch of a name to spell"right off without studying."

I set it down, private, because somebody might want me to spell it next, and so I wanted to be handy with it and rattle it off like I was used to it.

private - privado, privado

rattle - sonajero; hacer sonar, hacer vibrar

It was a mighty nice family, and a mighty nice house, too. I hadn't seen no house out in the country before that was so nice and had so much style. It didn't have an iron latch on the front door, nor a wooden one with a buckskin string, but a brass knob to turn, the same as houses in town. There warn't no bed in the parlor, nor a sign of a bed; but heaps of parlors in towns has beds in them. There was a big fireplace that was bricked on the bottom, and the bricks was kept clean and red by pouring water on them and scrubbing them with another brick; sometimes they wash them over with red water-paint that they call Spanish-brown, same as they do in town.

latch - picaporte; pestillo

knob - pomo; perilla, asa

parlors - salones; sala, sala de estar

fireplace - chimenea, hogar

bricked - brickeado; ladrillo

bricks - ladrillos; ladrillo

pouring - Vaciando; (pour) Vaciando

scrubbing - fregando; fregar bien, restregar

They had big brass dog-irons that could hold up a saw-log. There was a clock on the middle of the mantelpiece, with a picture of a town painted on the bottom half of the glass front, and a round place in the middle of it for the sun, and you could see the pendulum swinging behind it. It was beautiful to hear that clock tick; and sometimes when one of these peddlers had been along and scoured her up and got her in good shape, she would start in and strike a hundred and fifty before she got tuckered out. They wouldn't took any money for her.

irons - planchas; férreo, planchar

mantelpiece - mantel; repisa

pendulum - péndulo

tick - garrapata; tictac

peddlers - vendedores ambulantes; buhonero, vendedor ambulante

Well, there was a big outlandish parrot on each side of the clock, made out of something like chalk, and painted up gaudy. By one of the parrots was a cat made of crockery, and a crockery dog by the other; and when you pressed down on them they squeaked, but didn't open their mouths nor look different nor interested. They squeaked through underneath. There was a couple of big wild-turkey-wing fans spread out behind those things.

outlandish - extravagante; estrambótico, estrafalario, insólito, peregrino

chalk - creta, tiza, gis

parrots - loros; papagayo, loro, cotorra

crockery - vajilla, loza

pressed down - Presionar

squeaked - chirriaba; chirrido, rechinar

turkey - pavo, chompipe

Wing - ala, sección, parte, flanco, alero

On the table in the middle of the room was a kind of a lovely crockery basket that had apples and oranges and peaches and grapes piled up in it, which was much redder and yellower and prettier than real ones is, but they warn't real because you could see where pieces had got chipped off and showed the white chalk, or whatever it was, underneath.

basket - cesta, cesto, canasta

peaches - duraznos; melocotón

piled - apilado; montón, pila

This table had a cover made out of beautiful oilcloth, with a red and blue spread-eagle painted on it, and a painted border all around. It come all the way from Philadelphia, they said. There was some books, too, piled up perfectly exact, on each corner of the table. One was a big family Bible full of pictures. One was Pilgrim's Progress, about a man that left his family, it didn't say why. I read considerable in it now and then. The statements was interesting, but tough.

eagle - águila

border - frontera, borde, cenefa, orla, parterre

Philadelphia - Filadelfia

Bible - la biblia; biblia

pilgrim - peregrino, colonista

tough - difícil; resistente, severo, de mano dura, ni modo

Another was Friendship's Offering, full of beautiful stuff and poetry; but I didn't read the poetry. Another was Henry Clay's Speeches, and another was Dr. Gunn's Family Medicine, which told you all about what to do if a body was sick or dead. There was a hymn book, and a lot of other books. And there was nice split-bottom chairs, and perfectly sound, too"not bagged down in the middle and busted, like an old basket.

friendship - amistad

offering - ofrenda; ofrecimiento; (offer) ofrenda; ofrecimiento

poetry - poesía, poeticidad

hymn - himno

They had pictures hung on the walls"mainly Washingtons and Lafayettes, and battles, and Highland Marys, and one called "Signing the Declaration." There was some that they called crayons, which one of the daughters which was dead made her own self when she was only fifteen years old. They was different from any pictures I ever see before"blacker, mostly, than is common. One was a woman in a slim black dress, belted small under the armpits, with bulges like a cabbage in the middle of the sleeves, and a large black scoop-shovel bonnet with a black veil, and white slim ankles crossed about with black tape, and very wee black slippers, like a chisel, and she was leaning pensive on a tombstone on her right elbow, under a weeping willow, and her other hand hanging down her side holding a white handkerchief and a reticule, and underneath the picture it said "Shall I Never See Thee More Alas." Another one was a young lady with her hair all combed up straight to the top of her head, and knotted there in front of a comb like a chair-back, and she was crying into a handkerchief and had a dead bird laying on its back in her other hand with its heels up, and underneath the picture it said "I Shall Never Hear Thy Sweet Chirrup More Alas." There was one where a young lady was at a window looking up at the moon, and tears running down her cheeks; and she had an open letter in one hand with black sealing wax showing on one edge of it, and she was mashing a locket with a chain to it against her mouth, and underneath the picture it said "And Art Thou Gone Yes Thou Art Gone Alas.

Washingtons - washingtons; Washington

battles - batallas; batalla

Highland - tierras altas

declaration - declaración

crayons - crayones; creyón

bulges - protuberancias; bulto, abultamiento, protuberancia, abultar

cabbage - repollo

sleeves - mangas; manga, funda, enfundar

black veil - Velo negro

tape - cinta, atar, grabar

slippers - zapatillas; zapatilla, pantufla, babucha

chisel - cincel

pensive - pensativo, meditabundo, amohinado, melancólico

tombstone - lápida

weeping - Llorando; (weep) Llorando

handkerchief - panuelo; panuelo

thee - tú; vos (en Espana)

Alas - !ay!; (ala) !ay!

combed - peinado; peine

knotted - nudo

thy - tu; vuestro, vuestra, vuestros, vuestras

cheeks - mejilla, cacha, cachete, nalga, glúteo, descoco

sealing wax - Cera de sellado

mashing - Maceración; (mash) Maceración

locket - reloj; medallón, guardapelo

thou - tú; vos

These was all nice pictures, I reckon, but I didn't somehow seem to take to them, because if ever I was down a little they always give me the fan-tods. Everybody was sorry she died, because she had laid out a lot more of these pictures to do, and a body could see by what she had done what they had lost. But I reckoned that with her disposition she was having a better time in the graveyard. She was at work on what they said was her greatest picture when she took sick, and every day and every night it was her prayer to be allowed to live till she got it done, but she never got the chance. It was a picture of a young woman in a long white gown, standing on the rail of a bridge all ready to jump off, with her hair all down her back, and looking up to the moon, with the tears running down her face, and she had two arms folded across her breast, and two arms stretched out in front, and two more reaching up towards the moon"and the idea was to see which pair would look best, and then scratch out all the other arms; but, as I was saying, she died before she got her mind made up, and now they kept this picture over the head of the bed in her room, and every time her birthday come they hung flowers on it. Other times it was hid with a little curtain. The young woman in the picture had a kind of a nice sweet face, but there was so many arms it made her look too spidery, seemed to me.

disposition - disposición; inclinación, temperamento, carácter

graveyard - cementerio, campo santo, camposanto, panteón

prayer - Oración

rail - ferrocarril; barra

jump off - salir, saltar

folded - doblado; doblar, plegar

scratch out - tachar

curtain - cortina, telón

spidery - Aranoso

This young girl kept a scrap-book when she was alive, and used to paste obituaries and accidents and cases of patient suffering in it out of the Presbyterian Observer, and write poetry after them out of her own head. It was very good poetry. This is what she wrote about a boy by the name of Stephen Dowling Bots that fell down a well and was drownded:

scrap - chatarra; pedacito, retazo

paste - pasta, masa, paté, budín, engrudo, cola, pegar, engrudar

obituaries - obituarios; esquela, necrología, obituario, obituario

suffering - sufrido, sufriente, sufrimiento; (suffer); sufrir, penar

Presbyterian - presbiteriano, presbiteriano

observer - observador

ODE TO STEPHEN DOWLING BOTS, DEC'D

Ode - oda

And did young Stephen sicken,

And did young Stephen die?

And did the sad hearts thicken,

thicken - espesar

And did the mourners cry?

No; such was not the fate of

fate - destino, azar

Young Stephen Dowling Bots;

Though sad hearts round him thickened,

thickened - engrosado; espesar

'Twas not from sickness'shots.

sickness - enfermedad, dolencia

shots - disparos; tiro, disparo

No whooping-cough did rack his frame,

cough - toser, tos

rack - estante

Nor measles drear with spots;

measles - Sarampión

spots - puntos; mancha, grano, poquito, poquita, zona, paraje, lámpara

Not these impaired the sacred name

impaired - deteriorado; deteriorar, empeorar, descomponer, mermar

sacred - sagrado

Of Stephen Dowling Bots.

Despised love struck not with woe

despised - despreciado; desdenar

woe - pena, infortunio, ay

That head of curly knots,

knots - nudos; nudo

Nor stomach troubles laid him low,

Young Stephen Dowling Bots.

O no. Then list with tearful eye,

tearful - lágrimas; lloroso, lacrimoso, lagrimoso

Whilst I his fate do tell.

whilst - Mientras

His soul did from this cold world fly

soul - alma, espíritu

By falling down a well.

falling down - caerse, colapsar, fracasar

They got him out and emptied him;

Alas it was too late;

His spirit was gone for to sport aloft

In the realms of the good and great.

realms - reinos; esfera, reino

If Emmeline Grangerford could make poetry like that before she was fourteen, there ain't no telling what she could a done by-and-by. Buck said she could rattle off poetry like nothing. She didn't ever have to stop to think. He said she would slap down a line, and if she couldn't find anything to rhyme with it would just scratch it out and slap down another one, and go ahead. She warn't particular; she could write about anything you choose to give her to write about just so it was sadful. Every time a man died, or a woman died, or a child died, she would be on hand with her "tribute" before he was cold. She called them tributes. The neighbors said it was the doctor first, then Emmeline, then the undertaker"the undertaker never got in ahead of Emmeline but once, and then she hung fire on a rhyme for the dead person's name, which was Whistler. She warn't ever the same after that; she never complained, but she kinder pined away and did not live long.

slap - abofetada; bofetada, cachetada, abofetear, cachetear, golpear

rhyme - rima, rima, rimar

sadful - Triste

tributes - homenajes; tributo, homenaje

undertaker - enterrador; director de funeraria

Whistler - silbador

pined - pinado; alfiler

Poor thing, many's the time I made myself go up to the little room that used to be hers and get out her poor old scrap-book and read in it when her pictures had been aggravating me and I had soured on her a little. I liked all that family, dead ones and all, and warn't going to let anything come between us. Poor Emmeline made poetry about all the dead people when she was alive, and it didn't seem right that there warn't nobody to make some about her now she was gone; so I tried to sweat out a verse or two myself, but I couldn't seem to make it go somehow. They kept Emmeline's room trim and nice, and all the things fixed in it just the way she liked to have them when she was alive, and nobody ever slept there. The old lady took care of the room herself, though there was plenty of niggers, and she sewed there a good deal and read her Bible there mostly.

little room - habitación pequena

aggravating - agravante; agravar, empeorar, irritar, exasperar, sublevar

soured - agriado; agrio, ácido, acedo, acidez

verse - verso; estrofa

trim - recortar, orlar, ribetear

Well, as I was saying about the parlor, there was beautiful curtains on the windows: white, with pictures painted on them of castles with vines all down the walls, and cattle coming down to drink.

curtains - cortinas; cortina, telón

There was a little old piano, too, that had tin pans in it, I reckon, and nothing was ever so lovely as to hear the young ladies sing "The Last Link is Broken" and play "The Battle of Prague" on it. The walls of all the rooms was plastered, and most had carpets on the floors, and the whole house was whitewashed on the outside.

pans - cacerolas; cazuela, cazo, sartén (para freír), ..

battle - batalla

Prague - Praga

plastered - enyesado; ungüento, yeso, escayola, enlucido, revoque

whitewashed - panish: t-needed

It was a double house, and the big open place betwixt them was roofed and floored, and sometimes the table was set there in the middle of the day, and it was a cool, comfortable place. Nothing couldn't be better. And warn't the cooking good, and just bushels of it too!

bushels - anegas; fanega, celemín

CHAPTER XVIII.

Col. Grangerford was a gentleman, you see. He was a gentleman all over; and so was his family. He was well born, as the saying is, and that's worth as much in a man as it is in a horse, so the Widow Douglas said, and nobody ever denied that she was of the first aristocracy in our town; and pap he always said it, too, though he warn't no more quality than a mudcat himself. Col. Grangerford was very tall and very slim, and had a darkish-paly complexion, not a sign of red in it anywheres; he was clean shaved every morning all over his thin face, and he had the thinnest kind of lips, and the thinnest kind of nostrils, and a high nose, and heavy eyebrows, and the blackest kind of eyes, sunk so deep back that they seemed like they was looking out of caverns at you, as you may say. His forehead was high, and his hair was black and straight and hung to his shoulders. His hands was long and thin, and every day of his life he put on a clean shirt and a full suit from head to foot made out of linen so white it hurt your eyes to look at it; and on Sundays he wore a blue tail-coat with brass buttons on it.

denied - negado; negar

aristocracy - aristocracia

darkish - Oscuro

complexion - tez

shaved - afeitado; afeitarse

lips - labios; labio, labro

nostrils - fosas nasales; narina, fosa nasal

eyebrows - cejas; ceja

caverns - cavernas; caverna

forehead - la frente; frente

linen - lino, linge, ropa blanca, linocros

tail - cola

He carried a mahogany cane with a silver head to it. There warn't no frivolishness about him, not a bit, and he warn't ever loud. He was as kind as he could be"you could feel that, you know, and so you had confidence. Sometimes he smiled, and it was good to see; but when he straightened himself up like a liberty-pole, and the lightning begun to flicker out from under his eyebrows, you wanted to climb a tree first, and find out what the matter was afterwards. He didn't ever have to tell anybody to mind their manners"everybody was always good-mannered where he was. Everybody loved to have him around, too; he was sunshine most always"I mean he made it seem like good weather. When he turned into a cloudbank it was awful dark for half a minute, and that was enough; there wouldn't nothing go wrong again for a week.

mahogany - caoba

frivolishness - frivolidad

liberty - libertad

flicker - parpadeo; vacilar

mannered - Amanerado

sunshine - sol, luz del sol

cloudbank - banco de nubes

When him and the old lady come down in the morning all the family got up out of their chairs and give them good-day, and didn't set down again till they had set down.

Then Tom and Bob went to the sideboard where the decanter was, and mixed a glass of bitters and handed it to him, and he held it in his hand and waited till Tom's and Bob's was mixed, and then they bowed and said, "Our duty to you, sir, and madam;" and they bowed the least bit in the world and said thank you, and so they drank, all three, and Bob and Tom poured a spoonful of water on the sugar and the mite of whisky or apple brandy in the bottom of their tumblers, and give it to me and Buck, and we drank to the old people too.

sideboard - aparador, panish: t-needed

decanter - decantador

bitters - amargos; amargo

bowed - inclinado; inclinar(se), hacer una reverencia

Duty - deber, obligación, cometido, menester, arancel

madam - senora; senora, cabrona

spoonful - cucharada

mite - ácaro

brandy - brandy, conac

tumblers - vasos; seguro, vaso de lados rectos, tumbler, volatinero

Bob was the oldest and Tom next"tall, beautiful men with very broad shoulders and brown faces, and long black hair and black eyes. They dressed in white linen from head to foot, like the old gentleman, and wore broad Panama hats.

Panama - Panamá

Then there was Miss Charlotte; she was twenty-five, and tall and proud and grand, but as good as she could be when she warn't stirred up; but when she was she had a look that would make you wilt in your tracks, like her father. She was beautiful.

Charlotte - Carlota

wilt - te marchitas; marchitarse

So was her sister, Miss Sophia, but it was a different kind. She was gentle and sweet like a dove, and she was only twenty.

gentle - tierno, suave, tranquilo, medido, gradual, amable

dove - paloma; (dive) paloma

Each person had their own nigger to wait on them"Buck too. My nigger had a monstrous easy time, because I warn't used to having anybody do anything for me, but Buck's was on the jump most of the time.

wait on - esperar para; atender a

This was all there was of the family now, but there used to be more"three sons; they got killed; and Emmeline that died.

The old gentleman owned a lot of farms and over a hundred niggers.

Sometimes a stack of people would come there, horseback, from ten or fifteen mile around, and stay five or six days, and have such junketings round about and on the river, and dances and picnics in the woods daytimes, and balls at the house nights. These people was mostly kinfolks of the family. The men brought their guns with them. It was a handsome lot of quality, I tell you.

horseback - a caballo

round about - alrededor, cerca de

picnics - picnics; jira, pícnic

There was another clan of aristocracy around there"five or six families"mostly of the name of Shepherdson. They was as high-toned and well born and rich and grand as the tribe of Grangerfords. The Shepherdsons and Grangerfords used the same steamboat landing, which was about two mile above our house; so sometimes when I went up there with a lot of our folks I used to see a lot of the Shepherdsons there on their fine horses.

clan - clan

toned - tonificado; tonelada

tribe - tribu

One day Buck and me was away out in the woods hunting, and heard a horse coming. We was crossing the road. Buck says:

"Quick! Jump for the woods!"

We done it, and then peeped down the woods through the leaves. Pretty soon a splendid young man come galloping down the road, setting his horse easy and looking like a soldier. He had his gun across his pommel. I had seen him before. It was young Harney Shepherdson. I heard Buck's gun go off at my ear, and Harney's hat tumbled off from his head. He grabbed his gun and rode straight to the place where we was hid. But we didn't wait.

splendid - espléndido

galloping - galopando; galope, galopar

pommel - borrén, pomo

We started through the woods on a run. The woods warn't thick, so I looked over my shoulder to dodge the bullet, and twice I seen Harney cover Buck with his gun; and then he rode away the way he come"to get his hat, I reckon, but I couldn't see. We never stopped running till we got home. The old gentleman's eyes blazed a minute"'twas pleasure, mainly, I judged"then his face sort of smoothed down, and he says, kind of gentle:

bullet - bala

blazed - arde; llamarada, incendio; resplandor

pleasure - placer, voluptuosidad, gustar

smoothed - alisado; liso, sofisticado, constante, tranquilo, apacible

"I don't like that shooting from behind a bush. Why didn't you step into the road, my boy?"

bush - arbusto

"The Shepherdsons don't, father. They always take advantage."

Miss Charlotte she held her head up like a queen while Buck was telling his tale, and her nostrils spread and her eyes snapped. The two young men looked dark, but never said nothing. Miss Sophia she turned pale, but the color come back when she found the man warn't hurt.

Tale - cuento; historia, relato

snapped - se rompió; chasquido, crujido, chasquido de dedos, fotografía

Soon as I could get Buck down by the corn-cribs under the trees by ourselves, I says:

cribs - cunas; cuna, machete, chuleta, fusilar

"Did you want to kill him, Buck?"

"Well, I bet I did."

"What did he do to you?"

"Him? He never done nothing to me."

"Well, then, what did you want to kill him for?"

"Why, nothing"only it's on account of the feud."

feud - disputas; enemistad

"What's a feud?"

"Why, where was you raised? Don't you know what a feud is?"

"Never heard of it before"tell me about it."

"Well," says Buck, "a feud is this way: A man has a quarrel with another man, and kills him; then that other man's brother kills him; then the other brothers, on both sides, goes for one another; then the cousins chip in"and by-and-by everybody's killed off, and there ain't no more feud. But it's kind of slow, and takes a long time."

quarrel - discutir; pelea, rina

"Has this one been going on long, Buck?"

"Well, I should reckon! It started thirty year ago, or som'ers along there. There was trouble 'bout something, and then a lawsuit to settle it; and the suit went agin one of the men, and so he up and shot the man that won the suit"which he would naturally do, of course. Anybody would."

naturally - naturalmente

"What was the trouble about, Buck?"land?"

"I reckon maybe"I don't know."

"Well, who done the shooting? Was it a Grangerford or a Shepherdson?"

"Laws, how do I know? It was so long ago."

"Don't anybody know?"

"Oh, yes, pa knows, I reckon, and some of the other old people; but they don't know now what the row was about in the first place."

"Has there been many killed, Buck?"

"Yes; right smart chance of funerals. But they don't always kill. Pa's got a few buckshot in him; but he don't mind it 'cuz he don't weigh much, anyway. Bob's been carved up some with a bowie, and Tom's been hurt once or twice."

funerals - funerales; funeral

cuz - Corazón

weigh - pesar, levar, desancorar

carved - tallado; cortar, trinchar, tallar, esculpir

"Has anybody been killed this year, Buck?"

"Yes; we got one and they got one. 'Bout three months ago my cousin Bud, fourteen year old, was riding through the woods on t'other side of the river, and didn't have no weapon with him, which was blame'foolishness, and in a lonesome place he hears a horse a-coming behind him, and sees old Baldy Shepherdson a-linkin'after him with his gun in his hand and his white hair a-flying in the wind; and 'stead of jumping off and taking to the brush, Bud 'lowed he could out-run him; so they had it, nip and tuck, for five mile or more, the old man a-gaining all the time; so at last Bud seen it warn't any use, so he stopped and faced around so as to have the bullet holes in front, you know, and the old man he rode up and shot him down.

bud - colega; brote

weapon - arma

Baldy - calvorota, pelado

jumping off - salir, saltar

nip - pellizco; pellizcar

But he didn't git much chance to enjoy his luck, for inside of a week our folks laid him out."

"I reckon that old man was a coward, Buck."

coward - cobarde, gallina

"I reckon he warn't a coward. Not by a blame'sight. There ain't a coward amongst them Shepherdsons"not a one. And there ain't no cowards amongst the Grangerfords either. Why, that old man kep'up his end in a fight one day for half an hour against three Grangerfords, and come out winner. They was all a-horseback; he lit off of his horse and got behind a little woodpile, and kep'his horse before him to stop the bullets; but the Grangerfords stayed on their horses and capered around the old man, and peppered away at him, and he peppered away at them. Him and his horse both went home pretty leaky and crippled, but the Grangerfords had to be fetched home"and one of 'em was dead, and another died the next day. No, sir; if a body's out hunting for cowards he don't want to fool away any time amongst them Shepherdsons, becuz they don't breed any of that kind.

cowards - cobardes; cobarde, gallina

capered - capered; juguetear, brincar

leaky - fugas; permeable

crippled - lisiado, lisiado, lisiada

becuz - Por qué

breed - criar, procrear, aparearse, cultivar, engendrar, raza

Next Sunday we all went to church, about three mile, everybody a-horseback. The men took their guns along, so did Buck, and kept them between their knees or stood them handy against the wall. The Shepherdsons done the same.

It was pretty ornery preaching"all about brotherly love, and such-like tiresomeness; but everybody said it was a good sermon, and they all talked it over going home, and had such a powerful lot to say about faith and good works and free grace and preforeordestination, and I don't know what all, that it did seem to me to be one of the roughest Sundays I had run across yet.

preaching - Predicando; (preach); predicar

brotherly - fraternal, fraterno

tiresomeness - Cansancio

sermon - sermón

Faith - fe, confianza

preforeordestination - antes de la ordenación

roughest - más duro; áspero, aproximado, aproximativo, casi, turbulento

About an hour after dinner everybody was dozing around, some in their chairs and some in their rooms, and it got to be pretty dull. Buck and a dog was stretched out on the grass in the sun sound asleep. I went up to our room, and judged I would take a nap myself. I found that sweet Miss Sophia standing in her door, which was next to ours, and she took me in her room and shut the door very soft, and asked me if I liked her, and I said I did; and she asked me if I would do something for her and not tell anybody, and I said I would.

Then she said she'd forgot her Testament, and left it in the seat at church between two other books, and would I slip out quiet and go there and fetch it to her, and not say nothing to nobody. I said I would. So I slid out and slipped off up the road, and there warn't anybody at the church, except maybe a hog or two, for there warn't any lock on the door, and hogs likes a puncheon floor in summer-time because it's cool. If you notice, most folks don't go to church only when they've got to; but a hog is different.

Testament - testamento

Says I to myself, something's up; it ain't natural for a girl to be in such a sweat about a Testament. So I give it a shake, and out drops a little piece of paper with "Half-past two" wrote on it with a pencil. I ransacked it, but couldn't find anything else. I couldn't make anything out of that, so I put the paper in the book again, and when I got home and upstairs there was Miss Sophia in her door waiting for me. She pulled me in and shut the door; then she looked in the Testament till she found the paper, and as soon as she read it she looked glad; and before a body could think she grabbed me and give me a squeeze, and said I was the best boy in the world, and not to tell anybody.

ransacked - saqueado; saquear, desvalijar, escudrinar

She was mighty red in the face for a minute, and her eyes lighted up, and it made her powerful pretty. I was a good deal astonished, but when I got my breath I asked her what the paper was about, and she asked me if I had read it, and I said no, and she asked me if I could read writing, and I told her "no, only coarse-hand," and then she said the paper warn't anything but a book-mark to keep her place, and I might go and play now.

lighted up - Iluminado

astonished - asombrado; asombrar, sorprender, pasmar

I went off down to the river, studying over this thing, and pretty soon I noticed that my nigger was following along behind. When we was out of sight of the house he looked back and around a second, and then comes a-running, and says:

"Mars Jawge, if you'll come down into de swamp I'll show you a whole stack o'water-moccasins."

Mars - Marte; (Mar) Marte

swamp - embalsadero, pantano, ciénaga, embalse

moccasins - mocasines; mocasín

Thinks I, that's mighty curious; he said that yesterday. He oughter know a body don't love water-moccasins enough to go around hunting for them. What is he up to, anyway? So I says:

oughter - Risa

"All right; trot ahead."

I followed a half a mile; then he struck out over the swamp, and waded ankle deep as much as another half-mile. We come to a little flat piece of land which was dry and very thick with trees and bushes and vines, and he says:

waded - vadear; caminar por el agua

"You shove right in dah jist a few steps, Mars Jawge; dah's whah dey is. I's seed 'm befo'; I don't k'yer to see 'em no mo'."

seed - semilla

Then he slopped right along and went away, and pretty soon the trees hid him. I poked into the place a-ways and come to a little open patch as big as a bedroom all hung around with vines, and found a man laying there asleep"and, by jings, it was my old Jim!

patch - remiendo, parche

hung around - pasar el tiempo con

I waked him up, and I reckoned it was going to be a grand surprise to him to see me again, but it warn't. He nearly cried he was so glad, but he warn't surprised. Said he swum along behind me that night, and heard me yell every time, but dasn't answer, because he didn't want nobody to pick him up and take him into slavery again. Says he:

slavery - Esclavitud

"I got hurt a little, en couldn't swim fas', so I wuz a considable ways behine you towards de las'; when you landed I reck'ned I could ketch up wid you on de lan''dout havin'to shout at you, but when I see dat house I begin to go slow. I 'uz off too fur to hear what dey say to you"I wuz 'fraid o'de dogs; but when it 'uz all quiet agin I knowed you's in de house, so I struck out for de woods to wait for day.

shout at - Gritar a

fraid - Tienes miedo

Early in de mawnin'some er de niggers come along, gwyne to de fields, en dey tuk me en showed me dis place, whah de dogs can't track me on accounts o'de water, en dey brings me truck to eat every night, en tells me how you's a-gitt'n along."

"Why didn't you tell my Jack to fetch me here sooner, Jim?"

"Well, 'twarn't no use to 'sturb you, Huck, tell we could do sumfn"but we's all right now. I ben a-buyin'pots en pans en vittles, as I got a chanst, en a-patchin'up de raf'nights when""

sturb - Molestar

buyin - Comprando

pots - macetas; pote, cacerola, puchero; tarro; maceta, tiesto

vittles - Pequeno

"What raft, Jim?"

"Our ole raf'."

"You mean to say our old raft warn't smashed all to flinders?"

"No, she warn't. She was tore up a good deal"one en'of her was; but dey warn't no great harm done, on'y our traps was mos'all los'. Ef we hadn'dive'so deep en swum so fur under water, en de night hadn'ben so dark, en we warn't so sk'yerd, en ben sich punkin-heads, as de sayin'is, we'd a seed de raf'.

tore up - romper en pedazos; llenarse los ojos de lágrimas

dive - bucear; zambullirse, tirarse de cabeza

sayin - Qué dices

But it's jis'as well we didn't, 'kase now she's all fixed up agin mos'as good as new, en we's got a new lot o'stuff, in de place o'what 'uz los'."

"Why, how did you get hold of the raft again, Jim"did you catch her?"

"How I gwyne to ketch her en I out in de woods? No; some er de niggers foun'her ketched on a snag along heah in de ben', en dey hid her in a crick 'mongst de willows, en dey wuz so much jawin''bout which un 'um she b'long to de mos'dat I come to heah 'bout it pooty soon, so I ups en settles de trouble by tellin''um she don't b'long to none uv um, but to you en me; en I ast 'm if dey gwyne to grab a young white genlman's propaty, en git a hid'n for it? Den I gin 'm ten cents apiece, en dey 'uz mighty well satisfied, en wisht some mo'raf's 'ud come along en make 'm rich agin.

settles - se asienta; instalar, colocar

tellin - diciendo

gin - ginebra

Dey's mighty good to me, dese niggers is, en whatever I wants 'm to do fur me I doan'have to ast 'm twice, honey. Dat Jack's a good nigger, en pooty smart."

"Yes, he is. He ain't ever told me you was here; told me to come, and he'd show me a lot of water-moccasins. If anything happens he ain't mixed up in it. He can say he never seen us together, and it 'll be the truth."

I don't want to talk much about the next day. I reckon I'll cut it pretty short. I waked up about dawn, and was a-going to turn over and go to sleep again when I noticed how still it was"didn't seem to be anybody stirring. That warn't usual. Next I noticed that Buck was up and gone. Well, I gets up, a-wondering, and goes down stairs"nobody around; everything as still as a mouse. Just the same outside.

dawn - amanecer, alba, amanecer, aurora, madrugada

Thinks I, what does it mean? Down by the wood-pile I comes across my Jack, and says:

"What's it all about?"

What's it all about? - ?De qué se trata todo esto?

Says he:

"Don't you know, Mars Jawge?"

"No," says I, "I don't."

"Well, den, Miss Sophia's run off! 'deed she has. She run off in de night some time"nobody don't know jis'when; run off to get married to dat young Harney Shepherdson, you know"leastways, so dey 'spec. De fambly foun'it out 'bout half an hour ago"maybe a little mo'"en'I tell you dey warn't no time los'. Sich another hurryin'up guns en hosses you never see!

leastways - Por lo menos

fambly - Familia

hurryin - Te das prisa

De women folks has gone for to stir up de relations, en ole Mars Saul en de boys tuck dey guns en rode up de river road for to try to ketch dat young man en kill him 'fo'he kin git acrost de river wid Miss Sophia. I reck'n dey's gwyne to be mighty rough times."

stir up - provocar, suscitar

"Buck went off 'thout waking me up."

thout - Qué

"Well, I reck'n he did! Dey warn't gwyne to mix you up in it. Mars Buck he loaded up his gun en 'lowed he's gwyne to fetch home a Shepherdson or bust. Well, dey'll be plenty un 'm dah, I reck'n, en you bet you he'll fetch one ef he gits a chanst."

loaded up - cargado

I took up the river road as hard as I could put. By-and-by I begin to hear guns a good ways off. When I come in sight of the log store and the woodpile where the steamboats lands I worked along under the trees and brush till I got to a good place, and then I clumb up into the forks of a cottonwood that was out of reach, and watched.

There was a wood-rank four foot high a little ways in front of the tree, and first I was going to hide behind that; but maybe it was luckier I didn't.

rank - rango, graduación

There was four or five men cavorting around on their horses in the open place before the log store, cussing and yelling, and trying to get at a couple of young chaps that was behind the wood-rank alongside of the steamboat landing; but they couldn't come it. Every time one of them showed himself on the river side of the woodpile he got shot at. The two boys was squatting back to back behind the pile, so they could watch both ways.

cavorting - etozando; retozar, juguetear

chaps - chaps; tío, tipo

alongside - al costado, al lado, junto a, al lado de

squatting - sentarse en cuclillas

By-and-by the men stopped cavorting around and yelling. They started riding towards the store; then up gets one of the boys, draws a steady bead over the wood-rank, and drops one of them out of his saddle. All the men jumped off of their horses and grabbed the hurt one and started to carry him to the store; and that minute the two boys started on the run. They got half way to the tree I was in before the men noticed.

Then the men see them, and jumped on their horses and took out after them. They gained on the boys, but it didn't do no good, the boys had too good a start; they got to the woodpile that was in front of my tree, and slipped in behind it, and so they had the bulge on the men again. One of the boys was Buck, and the other was a slim young chap about nineteen years old.

Gained - ganado; ganar, adquirir, obtener, conseguir

bulge - bulto, abultamiento, protuberancia, abultar

The men ripped around awhile, and then rode away. As soon as they was out of sight I sung out to Buck and told him. He didn't know what to make of my voice coming out of the tree at first. He was awful surprised. He told me to watch out sharp and let him know when the men come in sight again; said they was up to some devilment or other"wouldn't be gone long. I wished I was out of that tree, but I dasn't come down. Buck begun to cry and rip, and 'lowed that him and his cousin Joe (that was the other young chap) would make up for this day yet. He said his father and his two brothers was killed, and two or three of the enemy.

awhile - un rato, algún tiempo

devilment - Endiablamiento

Joe - Che, Pepe, Pepito, Juan

enemy - enemigo, enemiga

Said the Shepherdsons laid for them in ambush. Buck said his father and brothers ought to waited for their relations"the Shepherdsons was too strong for them. I asked him what was become of young Harney and Miss Sophia. He said they'd got across the river and was safe. I was glad of that; but the way Buck did take on because he didn't manage to kill Harney that day he shot at him"I hain't ever heard anything like it.

ambush - emboscada, encerrona

All of a sudden, bang! bang! bang! goes three or four guns"the men had slipped around through the woods and come in from behind without their horses! The boys jumped for the river"both of them hurt"and as they swum down the current the men run along the bank shooting at them and singing out, "Kill them, kill them!

bang - portazo, golpe estrepitoso

It made me so sick I most fell out of the tree. I ain't a-going to tell all that happened"it would make me sick again if I was to do that. I wished I hadn't ever come ashore that night to see such things. I ain't ever going to get shut of them"lots of times I dream about them.

get shut - quedar encerrado/cerrado

I stayed in the tree till it begun to get dark, afraid to come down. Sometimes I heard guns away off in the woods; and twice I seen little gangs of men gallop past the log store with guns; so I reckoned the trouble was still a-going on. I was mighty downhearted; so I made up my mind I wouldn't ever go anear that house again, because I reckoned I was to blame, somehow.

gangs - pandillas; grupo, cuadrilla, equipo

gallop - galope, galopar

anear - Cerca

I judged that that piece of paper meant that Miss Sophia was to meet Harney somewheres at half-past two and run off; and I judged I ought to told her father about that paper and the curious way she acted, and then maybe he would a locked her up, and this awful mess wouldn't ever happened.

When I got down out of the tree I crept along down the river bank a piece, and found the two bodies laying in the edge of the water, and tugged at them till I got them ashore; then I covered up their faces, and got away as quick as I could. I cried a little when I was covering up Buck's face, for he was mighty good to me.

laying in - recoger; estar tumbado en

tugged - tiró; tirar, halar

covering up - cubrir, tapar

It was just dark now. I never went near the house, but struck through the woods and made for the swamp. Jim warn't on his island, so I tramped off in a hurry for the crick, and crowded through the willows, red-hot to jump aboard and get out of that awful country. The raft was gone! My souls, but I was scared! I couldn't get my breath for most a minute. Then I raised a yell. A voice not twenty-five foot from me says:

souls - almas; alma, espíritu

"Good lan'! is dat you, honey? Doan'make no noise."

It was Jim's voice"nothing ever sounded so good before. I run along the bank a piece and got aboard, and Jim he grabbed me and hugged me, he was so glad to see me. He says:

hugged - abrazado; abrazo, abrazar

"Laws bless you, chile, I 'uz right down sho'you's dead agin. Jack's been heah; he say he reck'n you's ben shot, kase you didn'come home no mo'; so I's jes'dis minute a startin'de raf'down towards de mouf er de crick, so's to be all ready for to shove out en leave soon as Jack comes agin en tells me for certain you is dead. Lawsy, I's mighty glad to git you back again, honey."

startin - Empezando

I says:

"All right"that's mighty good; they won't find me, and they'll think I've been killed, and floated down the river"there's something up there that 'll help them think so"so don't you lose no time, Jim, but just shove off for the big water as fast as ever you can."

I never felt easy till the raft was two mile below there and out in the middle of the Mississippi. Then we hung up our signal lantern, and judged that we was free and safe once more. I hadn't had a bite to eat since yesterday, so Jim he got out some corn-dodgers and buttermilk, and pork and cabbage and greens"there ain't nothing in the world so good when it's cooked right"and whilst I eat my supper we talked and had a good time.

signal - senal; senal, senalar

I was powerful glad to get away from the feuds, and so was Jim to get away from the swamp. We said there warn't no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don't. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.

feuds - nemistades; enemistad

smothery - Sofocos

CHAPTER XIX.

Two or three days and nights went by; I reckon I might say they swum by, they slid along so quiet and smooth and lovely. Here is the way we put in the time. It was a monstrous big river down there"sometimes a mile and a half wide; we run nights, and laid up and hid daytimes; soon as night was most gone we stopped navigating and tied up"nearly always in the dead water under a tow-head; and then cut young cottonwoods and willows, and hid the raft with them. Then we set out the lines. Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool off; then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep, and watched the daylight come. Not a sound anywheres"perfectly still"just like the whole world was asleep, only sometimes the bullfrogs a-cluttering, maybe.

smooth - liso, sofisticado, constante, tranquilo, apacible, suave, alisar

navigating - navegando; navegar

freshen - Refrescar

cool off - enfriar(se)

Sandy - arenoso

bullfrogs - ranas toro; rana toro

cluttering - desorden, revoltijo, enredo

The first thing to see, looking away over the water, was a kind of dull line"that was the woods on t'other side; you couldn't make nothing else out; then a pale place in the sky; then more paleness spreading around; then the river softened up away off, and warn't black any more, but gray; you could see little dark spots drifting along ever so far away"trading scows, and such things; and long black streaks"rafts; sometimes you could hear a sweep screaking; or jumbled up voices, it was so still, and sounds come so far; and by-and-by you could see a streak on the water which you know by the look of the streak that There's a snag there in a swift current which breaks on it and makes that streak look that way; and you see the mist curl up off of the water, and the east reddens up, and the river, and you make out a log-cabin in the edge of the woods, away on the bank on t'other side of the river, being a woodyard, likely, and piled by them cheats so you can throw a dog through it anywheres; then the nice breeze springs up, and comes fanning you from over there, so cool and fresh and sweet to smell on account of the woods and the flowers; but sometimes not that way, because they've left dead fish laying around, gars and such, and they do get pretty rank; and next you've got the full day, and everything smiling in the sun, and the song-birds just going it!

paleness - pálido; palidez

softened - suavizado; ablandar, suavizar

scows - una lancha

streaks - vetas; raya, trazo, sarta, racha, ristra

screaking - Gritar

jumbled - evuelto; desordenar

There's a snag - Hay un obstáculo

mist - niebla; neblina

curl up - acurrucarse

reddens - enrojecer

bank on - apostar por; confiar en; contar con

woodyard - lenera

cheats - tramposos; enganar, estafar, timar

A little smoke couldn't be noticed now, so we would take some fish off of the lines and cook up a hot breakfast. And afterwards we would watch the lonesomeness of the river, and kind of lazy along, and by-and-by lazy off to sleep. Wake up by-and-by, and look to see what done it, and maybe see a steamboat coughing along up-stream, so far off towards the other side you couldn't tell nothing about her only whether she was a stern-wheel or side-wheel; then for about an hour there wouldn't be nothing to hear nor nothing to see"just solid lonesomeness. Next you'd see a raft sliding by, away off yonder, and maybe a galoot on it chopping, because they're most always doing it on a raft; you'd see the axe flash and come down"you don't hear nothing; you see that axe go up again, and by the time it's above the man's head then you hear the k'chunk!

lonesomeness - soledad

coughing - Tos; (cough); toser, tos

galoot - gaznápiro

chopping - Cortando; (chop) Cortando

chunk - trozo, pedazo, bloque, fragmento

it had took all that time to come over the water. So we would put in the day, lazying around, listening to the stillness. Once there was a thick fog, and the rafts and things that went by was beating tin pans so the steamboats wouldn't run over them. A scow or a raft went by so close we could hear them talking and cussing and laughing"heard them plain; but we couldn't see no sign of them; it made you feel crawly; it was like spirits carrying on that way in the air. Jim said he believed it was spirits; but I says:

"No; spirits wouldn't say, ˜Dern the dern fog.'"

Soon as it was night out we shoved; when we got her out to about the middle we let her alone, and let her float wherever the current wanted her to; then we lit the pipes, and dangled our legs in the water, and talked about all kinds of things"we was always naked, day and night, whenever the mosquitoes would let us"the new clothes Buck's folks made for me was too good to be comfortable, and besides I didn't go much on clothes, nohow.

dangled - colgado; pender

mosquitoes - mosquitos; mosquito

Sometimes we'd have that whole river all to ourselves for the longest time. Yonder was the banks and the islands, across the water; and maybe a spark"which was a candle in a cabin window; and sometimes on the water you could see a spark or two"on a raft or a scow, you know; and maybe you could hear a fiddle or a song coming over from one of them crafts. It's lovely to live on a raft. We had the sky up there, all speckled with stars, and we used to lay on our backs and look up at them, and discuss about whether they was made or only just happened.

crafts - artesanía; pericia, oficio, nave, labrar, hacer a mano

Jim he allowed they was made, but I allowed they happened; I judged it would have took too long to make so many. Jim said the moon could a laid them; well, that looked kind of reasonable, so I didn't say nothing against it, because I've seen a frog lay most as many, so of course it could be done. We used to watch the stars that fell, too, and see them streak down. Jim allowed they'd got spoiled and was hove out of the nest.

spoiled - mimado; expoliar, despojar, danar, arruinar, echar a perder

After midnight the people on shore went to bed, and then for two or three hours the shores was black"no more sparks in the cabin windows. These sparks was our clock"the first one that showed again meant morning was coming, so we hunted a place to hide and tie up right away.

shores - ostas; costa, playa

sparks - chispas; chispa

tie up - Atar

One morning about daybreak I found a canoe and crossed over a chute to the main shore"it was only two hundred yards"and paddled about a mile up a crick amongst the cypress woods, to see if I couldn't get some berries. Just as I was passing a place where a kind of a cowpath crossed the crick, here comes a couple of men tearing up the path as tight as they could foot it. I thought I was a goner, for whenever anybody was after anybody I judged it was me"or maybe Jim.

chute - aracaídas; conducto

cypress - ciprés

cowpath - Camino de vacas

tearing up - romper en pedazos; llenarse los ojos de lágrimas

goner - fallecido; hombre muerto, piltrafa

I was about to dig out from there in a hurry, but they was pretty close to me then, and sung out and begged me to save their lives"said they hadn't been doing nothing, and was being chased for it"said there was men and dogs a-coming. They wanted to jump right in, but I says:

dig out - desenterrar, sacar, encontrar

"Don't you do it. I don't hear the dogs and horses yet; you've got time to crowd through the brush and get up the crick a little ways; then you take to the water and wade down to me and get in"that'll throw the dogs off the scent."

scent - olor, esencia, olfato, fragancia, oler

They done it, and soon as they was aboard I lit out for our tow-head, and in about five or ten minutes we heard the dogs and the men away off, shouting.

We heard them come along towards the crick, but couldn't see them; they seemed to stop and fool around a while; then, as we got further and further away all the time, we couldn't hardly hear them at all; by the time we had left a mile of woods behind us and struck the river, everything was quiet, and we paddled over to the tow-head and hid in the cottonwoods and was safe.

One of these fellows was about seventy or upwards, and had a bald head and very gray whiskers. He had an old battered-up slouch hat on, and a greasy blue woollen shirt, and ragged old blue jeans britches stuffed into his boot-tops, and home-knit galluses"no, he only had one. He had an old long-tailed blue jeans coat with slick brass buttons flung over his arm, and both of them had big, fat, ratty-looking carpet-bags.

bald head - Cabeza calva

battered - maltratada; banar

woollen - Lana

knit - hacer punto, tricotar, tejer, soldarse, construir, elaborar

galluses - Galo

tailed - con cola; cola

The other fellow was about thirty, and dressed about as ornery. After breakfast we all laid off and talked, and the first thing that come out was that these chaps didn't know one another.

"What got you into trouble?" says the baldhead to t'other chap.

baldhead - Calvo

"Well, I'd been selling an article to take the tartar off the teeth"and it does take it off, too, and generly the enamel along with it"but I stayed about one night longer than I ought to, and was just in the act of sliding out when I ran across you on the trail this side of town, and you told me they were coming, and begged me to help you to get off.

Tartar - tártaro; Sarro Dental

enamel - esmalte

trail - seguir, arrastrar, rastro, pista, sendero

So I told you I was expecting trouble myself, and would scatter out with you. That's the whole yarn"what's yourn?

Scatter - dispersión; dispersar, esparcir

yourn - Tu

"Well, I'd ben a-running'a little temperance revival thar 'bout a week, and was the pet of the women folks, big and little, for I was makin'it mighty warm for the rummies, I tell you, and takin'as much as five or six dollars a night"ten cents a head, children and niggers free"and business a-growin'all the time, when somehow or another a little report got around last night that I had a way of puttin'in my time with a private jug on the sly. A nigger rousted me out this mornin', and told me the people was getherin'on the quiet with their dogs and horses, and they'd be along pretty soon and give me 'bout half an hour's start, and then run me down if they could; and if they got me they'd tar and feather me and ride me on a rail, sure.

revival - reavivación; avivamiento

thar - Allí

takin - tomando; takín

growin - Creciendo

got around - dar vueltas, circular, ser suficiente

puttin - uttin

mornin - Manana

getherin - Gherin

tar and feather - echar brea y plumas

I didn't wait for no breakfast"I warn't hungry."

"Old man," said the young one, "I reckon we might double-team it together; what do you think?"

"I ain't undisposed. What's your line"mainly?"

undisposed - sin disponer

"Jour printer by trade; do a little in patent medicines; theater-actor"tragedy, you know; take a turn to mesmerism and phrenology when there's a chance; teach singing-geography school for a change; sling a lecture sometimes"oh, I do lots of things"most anything that comes handy, so it ain't work. What's your lay?"

jour - our

by trade - por oficio

patent - patente

theater - teatro, zona

tragedy - tragedia

phrenology - frenología

sling - eslinga; cabestrillo

"I've done considerble in the doctoring way in my time. Layin'on o'hands is my best holt"for cancer and paralysis, and sich things; and I k'n tell a fortune pretty good when I've got somebody along to find out the facts for me. Preachin's my line, too, and workin'camp-meetin's, and missionaryin'around."

Cancer - cáncer

paralysis - parálisis

preachin - Predicando

workin - Trabajando

meetin - Reunión

missionaryin - misionero

Nobody never said anything for a while; then the young man hove a sigh and says:

sigh - suspiro; suspirar

"Alas!"

"What 're you alassin'about?" says the bald-head.

bald - calvo, pelón

"To think I should have lived to be leading such a life, and be degraded down into such company." And he begun to wipe the corner of his eye with a rag.

degraded - degradado; degradar, erosionar

wipe - limpiar

"Dern your skin, ain't the company good enough for you?" says the baldhead, pretty pert and uppish.

uppish - Arriba

"Yes, it is good enough for me; it's as good as I deserve; for who fetched me so low when I was so high? I did myself.

I don't blame you, gentlemen"far from it; I don't blame anybody. I deserve it all. Let the cold world do its worst; one thing I know"there's a grave somewhere for me. The world may go on just as it's always done, and take everything from me"loved ones, property, everything; but it can't take that. Some day I'll lie down in it and forget it all, and my poor broken heart will be at rest." He went on a-wiping.

be at rest - estar en reposo, descansar; estar muerto

wiping - Limpiar; (wipe) Limpiar

"Drot your pore broken heart," says the baldhead; "what are you heaving your pore broken heart at us f'r? We hain't done nothing."

pore - poro

heaving - Agitado; (heave); ondular

"No, I know you haven't. I ain't blaming you, gentlemen. I brought myself down"yes, I did it myself. It's right I should suffer"perfectly right"I don't make any moan."

blaming - culpando; culpar, responsabilizar, echar la culpa

suffer - sufrir, penar, empeorar

"Brought you down from whar? Whar was you brought down from?"

"Ah, you would not believe me; the world never believes"let it pass"'tis no matter. The secret of my birth""

"The secret of your birth! Do you mean to say""

"Gentlemen," says the young man, very solemn, "I will reveal it to you, for I feel I may have confidence in you. by rights I am a duke!"

reveal - revelar, propalar

by rights - según la ley

Duke - duque

Jim's eyes bugged out when he heard that; and I reckon mine did, too. Then the baldhead says: "No! you can't mean it?"

"Yes. My great-grandfather, eldest son of the Duke of Bridgewater, fled to this country about the end of the last century, to breathe the pure air of freedom; married here, and died, leaving a son, his own father dying about the same time. The second son of the late duke seized the titles and estates"the infant real duke was ignored. I am the lineal descendant of that infant"I am the rightful Duke of Bridgewater; and here am I, forlorn, torn from my high estate, hunted of men, despised by the cold world, ragged, worn, heart-broken, and degraded to the companionship of felons on a raft!

great-grandfather - (great-grandfather) bisabuelo

fled - huyó; huir, desvanecerse, checkfugarse

pure - pura; puro

dying - Muriendo; (dye) Muriendo

seized - incautado; agarrar, apoderarse de, apresar, aferrar, tomar

estates - incas; propiedad, inmueble, bien, estamento, finca

infant - nino; nene, infante

ignored - ignorado; ignorar, desoír

descendant - descendiente

forlorn - abandonado, desamparado, desesperado

torn - desgarrado; lágrima

felons - delincuentes; criminal

Jim pitied him ever so much, and so did I. We tried to comfort him, but he said it warn't much use, he couldn't be much comforted; said if we was a mind to acknowledge him, that would do him more good than most anything else; so we said we would, if he would tell us how.

pitied - compasión, piedad, lástima, pena, tener lástima

comforted - confortado; comodidad, consuelo, confortar

acknowledge - reconocer, acusar recibo

He said we ought to bow when we spoke to him, and say "Your Grace," or "My Lord," or "Your Lordship""and he wouldn't mind it if we called him plain "Bridgewater," which, he said, was a title anyway, and not a name; and one of us ought to wait on him at dinner, and do any little thing for him he wanted done.

Well, that was all easy, so we done it. All through dinner Jim stood around and waited on him, and says, "Will yo'Grace have some o'dis or some o'dat?" and so on, and a body could see it was mighty pleasing to him.

But the old man got pretty silent by-and-by"didn't have much to say, and didn't look pretty comfortable over all that petting that was going on around that duke. He seemed to have something on his mind. So, along in the afternoon, he says:

"Looky here, Bilgewater," he says, "I'm nation sorry for you, but you ain't the only person that's had troubles like that."

"No?"

"No you ain't. You ain't the only person that's ben snaked down wrongfully out'n a high place."

wrongfully - injustamente

"Alas!"

"No, you ain't the only person that's had a secret of his birth." And, by jings, he begins to cry.

"Hold! What do you mean?"

"Bilgewater, kin I trust you?" says the old man, still sort of sobbing.

sobbing - sollozando; sollozo, sollozante; (sob); hdp

"To the bitter death!" He took the old man by the hand and squeezed it, and says, "That secret of your being: speak!"

Bitter - amargo

squeezed - exprimido; exprimir, apretar, apretujar, apuro, crisis, apretón

"Bilgewater, I am the late Dauphin!"

Dauphin - delfín

You bet you, Jim and me stared this time. Then the duke says:

"You are what?"

"Yes, my friend, it is too true"your eyes is lookin'at this very moment on the pore disappeared Dauphin, Looy the Seventeen, son of Looy the Sixteen and Marry Antonette."

lookin - Mirando

"You! At your age! No! You mean you're the late Charlemagne; you must be six or seven hundred years old, at the very least."

Charlemagne - Carlomagno

"Trouble has done it, Bilgewater, trouble has done it; trouble has brung these gray hairs and this premature balditude. Yes, gentlemen, you see before you, in blue jeans and misery, the wanderin', exiled, trampled-on, and sufferin'rightful King of France."

premature - prematuro

balditude - calvicie

misery - miseria, sinvivir, desgracia, desdicha, infortunio

wanderin - Deambulando

exiled - exilio, destierro, exiliado, desterrado, exiliar, desterrar

trampled - pisoteado; pisotear, hollar, maltratar, humillar, ofender

sufferin - Sufriendo

Well, he cried and took on so that me and Jim didn't know hardly what to do, we was so sorry"and so glad and proud we'd got him with us, too. So we set in, like we done before with the duke, and tried to comfort him. But he said it warn't no use, nothing but to be dead and done with it all could do him any good; though he said it often made him feel easier and better for a while if people treated him according to his rights, and got down on one knee to speak to him, and always called him "Your Majesty," and waited on him first at meals, and didn't set down in his presence till he asked them.

comfort - comodidad, consuelo, confortar

presence - presencia

So Jim and me set to majestying him, and doing this and that and t'other for him, and standing up till he told us we might set down. This done him heaps of good, and so he got cheerful and comfortable. But the duke kind of soured on him, and didn't look a bit satisfied with the way things was going; still, the king acted real friendly towards him, and said the duke's great-grandfather and all the other Dukes of Bilgewater was a good deal thought of by his father, and was allowed to come to the palace considerable; but the duke stayed huffy a good while, till by-and-by the king says:

majestying - Majestad

"Like as not we got to be together a blamed long time on this h-yer raft, Bilgewater, and so what's the use o'your bein'sour? It 'll only make things oncomfortable. It ain't my fault I warn't born a duke, it ain't your fault you warn't born a king"so what's the use to worry? Make the best o'things the way you find 'em, says I"that's my motto.

oncomfortable - nfortable

motto - mote, divisa, lema

This ain't no bad thing that we've struck here"plenty grub and an easy life"come, give us your hand, duke, and le's all be friends."

grub - larva, verme, manduca, manducatoria, condumio

The duke done it, and Jim and me was pretty glad to see it. It took away all the uncomfortableness and we felt mighty good over it, because it would a been a miserable business to have any unfriendliness on the raft; for what you want, above all things, on a raft, is for everybody to be satisfied, and feel right and kind towards the others.

uncomfortableness - Incomodidad

It didn't take me long to make up my mind that these liars warn't no kings nor dukes at all, but just low-down humbugs and frauds. But I never said nothing, never let on; kept it to myself; it's the best way; then you don't have no quarrels, and don't get into no trouble. If they wanted us to call them kings and dukes, I hadn't no objections, 'long as it would keep peace in the family; and it warn't no use to tell Jim, so I didn't tell him.

liars - mentirosos; mentiroso, mentirosa, embustero, embustera

humbugs - humbugs; farsa, disparate, tontería, bobería, fraude

frauds - fraude, defraudador

If I never learnt nothing else out of pap, I learnt that the best way to get along with his kind of people is to let them have their own way.

CHAPTER XX.

They asked us considerable many questions; wanted to know what we covered up the raft that way for, and laid by in the daytime instead of running"was Jim a runaway nigger? Says I:

"Goodness sakes! would a runaway nigger run south?"

No, they allowed he wouldn't. I had to account for things some way, so I says:

"My folks was living in Pike County, in Missouri, where I was born, and they all died off but me and pa and my brother Ike. Pa, he 'lowed he'd break up and go down and live with Uncle Ben, who's got a little one-horse place on the river, forty-four mile below Orleans. Pa was pretty poor, and had some debts; so when he'd squared up there warn't nothing left but sixteen dollars and our nigger, Jim. That warn't enough to take us fourteen hundred mile, deck passage nor no other way. Well, when the river rose pa had a streak of luck one day; he ketched this piece of a raft; so we reckoned we'd go down to Orleans on it. Pa's luck didn't hold out; a steamboat run over the forrard corner of the raft one night, and we all went overboard and dove under the wheel; Jim and me come up all right, but pa was drunk, and Ike was only four years old, so they never come up no more. Well, for the next day or two we had considerable trouble, because people was always coming out in skiffs and trying to take Jim away from me, saying they believed he was a runaway nigger.

died off - extinguido

debts - deudas; deuda, pufo

We don't run daytimes no more now; nights they Don't bother us."

Don't bother - No te molestes

The duke says:

"Leave me alone to cipher out a way so we can run in the daytime if we want to. I'll think the thing over"I'll invent a plan that'll fix it. We'll let it alone for to-day, because of course we don't want to go by that town yonder in daylight"it mightn't be healthy."

cipher - cifra, cifra, la glosa, gloss, gloss

Towards night it begun to darken up and look like rain; the heat lightning was squirting around low down in the sky, and the leaves was beginning to shiver"it was going to be pretty ugly, it was easy to see that. So the duke and the king went to overhauling our wigwam, to see what the beds was like. My bed was a straw tick better than Jim's, which was a corn-shuck tick; there's always cobs around about in a shuck tick, and they poke into you and hurt; and when you roll over the dry shucks sound like you was rolling over in a pile of dead leaves; it makes such a rustling that you wake up.

darken - oscurecer, obscurecer

shiver - tiritando; temblar, tiritar, estremecerse

ugly - feo, callo

overhauling - revisión, repaso, ajuste, reparación general, revisar

straw - paja, pajizo, pajiza

shuck - Chuck

cobs - mazorcas; Mazorca

rustling - usurro; (rustle); crujido

Well, the duke allowed he would take my bed; but the king allowed he wouldn't. He says:

"I should a reckoned the difference in rank would a sejested to you that a corn-shuck bed warn't just fitten for me to sleep on. Your Grace 'll take the shuck bed yourself."

Jim and me was in a sweat again for a minute, being afraid there was going to be some more trouble amongst them; so we was pretty glad when the duke says:

"'Tis my fate to be always ground into the mire under the iron heel of oppression. Misfortune has broken my once haughty spirit; I yield, I submit; 'tis my fate. I am alone in the world"let me suffer; can bear it."

mire - lodos

oppression - opresión

misfortune - infortunio, gafe, mala suerte, desgracia

haughty - soberbio, altanero

yield - ceder

submit - enviar; entregar; presentar; someterse; dar argumento

We got away as soon as it was good and dark. The king told us to stand well out towards the middle of the river, and not show a light till we got a long ways below the town. We come in sight of the little bunch of lights by-and-by"that was the town, you know"and slid by, about a half a mile out, all right. When we was three-quarters of a mile below we hoisted up our signal lantern; and about ten o'clock it come on to rain and blow and thunder and lighten like everything; so the king told us to both stay on watch till the weather got better; then him and the duke crawled into the wigwam and turned in for the night. It was my watch below till twelve, but I wouldn't a turned in anyway if I'd had a bed, because a body don't see such a storm as that every day in the week, not by a long sight.

hoisted - izadas; izar, aparejo

My souls, how the wind did scream along! And every second or two there'd come a glare that lit up the white-caps for a half a mile around, and you'd see the islands looking dusty through the rain, and the trees thrashing around in the wind; then comes a h-whack!"bum! bum! bumble-umble-um-bum-bum-bum-bum"and the thunder would go rumbling and grumbling away, and quit"and then rip comes another flash and another sockdolager. The waves most washed me off the raft sometimes, but I hadn't any clothes on, and didn't mind. We didn't have no trouble about snags; the lightning was glaring and flittering around so constant that we could see them plenty soon enough to throw her head this way or that and miss them.

scream - grito, gritar

glare - resplandor; mirada fulminante

caps - capuchones; gorra

dusty - polvoriento

thrashing - golpeando; paliza, jarabe de palo, golpiza

bum - vago; culo, trasero

umble - Tumble

glaring - deslumbrante; mirada fulminante

constant - constante, perseverante, firme, constante

I had the middle watch, you know, but I was pretty sleepy by that time, so Jim he said he would stand the first half of it for me; he was always mighty good that way, Jim was. I crawled into the wigwam, but the king and the duke had their legs sprawled around so there warn't no show for me; so I laid outside"I didn't mind the rain, because it was warm, and the waves warn't running so high now.

sprawled - desparramado; despatarrar, desparramo

About two they come up again, though, and Jim was going to call me; but he changed his mind, because he reckoned they warn't high enough yet to do any harm; but he was mistaken about that, for pretty soon all of a sudden along comes a regular ripper and washed me overboard. It most killed Jim a-laughing. He was the easiest nigger to laugh that ever was, anyway.

I took the watch, and Jim he laid down and snored away; and by-and-by the storm let up for good and all; and the first cabin-light that showed I rousted him out, and we slid the raft into hiding quarters for the day.

snored - roncaba; roncar, ronquido

The king got out an old ratty deck of cards after breakfast, and him and the duke played seven-up a while, five cents a game. Then they got tired of it, and allowed they would "lay out a campaign," as they called it. The duke went down into his carpet-bag, and fetched up a lot of little printed bills and read them out loud. One bill said, "The celebrated Dr. Armand de Montalban, of Paris," would "lecture on the Science of Phrenology" at such and such a place, on the blank day of blank, at ten cents admission, and "furnish charts of character at twenty-five cents apiece.

campaign - campana; campana, sondear

lecture on - clase, lección, conferencia sobre

admission - admisión, admisión, confesión

furnish - amoblar, amueblar, suministrar, proporcionar, dotar

The duke said that was him. In another bill he was the "world-renowned Shakespearian tragedian, Garrick the Younger, of Drury Lane, London." In other bills he had a lot of other names and done other wonderful things, like finding water and gold with a "divining-rod," "dissipating witch spells," and so on. By-and-by he says:

renowned - reconocido; renombre, distinción, fama, nombradía

Shakespearian - Shakespeariano

tragedian - tragedia; tragediógrafo

lane - camino, carril

divining-rod - (divining-rod) varita de rabdomante

witch - bruja

"But the histrionic muse is the darling. Have you ever trod the boards, Royalty?"

histrionic - histriónico

muse - Musa

darling - carino; querido, querida, amado, amada

royalty - realeza

"No," says the king.

"You shall, then, before you're three days older, Fallen Grandeur," says the duke. "The first good town we come to we'll hire a hall and do the sword fight in Richard III. and the balcony scene in Romeo and Juliet. How does that strike you?"

grandeur - grandeza

hire - contratar; alquilar

sword - espada, gladio

Richard - Ricardo

balcony - balcón, palco

Romeo - Romeo

"I'm in, up to the hub, for anything that will pay, Bilgewater; but, you see, I don't know nothing about play-actin', and hain't ever seen much of it. I was too small when pap used to have 'em at the palace. Do you reckon you can learn me?"

hub - cubo; buje, maza, distribuidor vial, or planes, trains

actin - actina

"Easy!"

"All right. I'm jist a-freezn'for something fresh, anyway. Le's commence right away."

commence - comenzar, empezar, iniciar, principiar

So the duke he told him all about who Romeo was and who Juliet was, and said he was used to being Romeo, so the king could be Juliet.

"But if Juliet's such a young gal, duke, my peeled head and my white whiskers is goin'to look oncommon odd on her, maybe."

peeled - pelado; pelar

oncommon - común

"No, don't you worry; these country jakes won't ever think of that. Besides, you know, you'll be in costume, and that makes all the difference in the world; Juliet's in a balcony, enjoying the moonlight before she goes to bed, and she's got on her night-gown and her ruffled nightcap. Here are the costumes for the parts."

moonlight - la luz de la luna; luz de la luna, lunada, pluriemplearse

ruffled - revuelto; volante, retorcer

nightcap - gorra de dormir; gorro de dormir

costumes - disfraces; traje, disfraz

He got out two or three curtain-calico suits, which he said was meedyevil armor for Richard III. and t'other chap, and a long white cotton nightshirt and a ruffled nightcap to match.

armor - armadura, blindaje, coraza, blindado

cotton - algodón

nightshirt - camisón; camisa de dormir

The king was satisfied; so the duke got out his book and read the parts over in the most splendid spread-eagle way, prancing around and acting at the same time, to show how it had got to be done; then he give the book to the king and told him to get his part by heart.

most splendid - el más espléndido

prancing - Presumiendo; (prance); encabritarse

by heart - de memoria

There was a little one-horse town about three mile down the bend, and after dinner the duke said he had ciphered out his idea about how to run in daylight without it being dangersome for Jim; so he allowed he would go down to the town and fix that thing. The king allowed he would go, too, and see if he couldn't strike something. We was out of coffee, so Jim said I better go along with them in the canoe and get some.

ciphered - cifrado; cifra, cifra, la glosa, gloss, gloss

dangersome - Peligroso

When we got there there warn't nobody stirring; streets empty, and perfectly dead and still, like Sunday. We found a sick nigger sunning himself in a back yard, and he said everybody that warn't too young or too sick or too old was gone to camp-meeting, about two mile back in the woods. The king got the directions, and allowed he'd go and work that camp-meeting for all it was worth, and I might go, too.

The duke said what he was after was a printing-office. We found it; a little bit of a concern, up over a carpenter shop"carpenters and printers all gone to the meeting, and no doors locked. It was a dirty, littered-up place, and had ink marks, and handbills with pictures of horses and runaway niggers on them, all over the walls. The duke shed his coat and said he was all right now. So me and the king lit out for the camp-meeting.

printing-office - (printing-office) Oficina de impresión

concern - preocupación, referirse a, ataner, concernir, tocar, preocupar

carpenters - carpinteros; carpintero, carpintera, ebanista

printers - impresoras; impresor, impresora

ink - tinta, entintar, firmar, tatuar

handbills - Panfleto

We got there in about a half an hour fairly dripping, for it was a most awful hot day. There was as much as a thousand people there from twenty mile around. The woods was full of teams and wagons, hitched everywheres, feeding out of the wagon-troughs and stomping to keep off the flies.

dripping - goteo; chorreo; (drip) goteo; chorreo

wagons - vagones; carro, coche

everywheres - en todas partes

troughs - omederos; comedero (for food), abrevadero (for drinking)

stomping - pisando; pisotear

There was sheds made out of poles and roofed over with branches, where they had lemonade and gingerbread to sell, and piles of watermelons and green corn and such-like truck.

sheds - obertizos; cobertizo, nave

poles - postes; polo

roofed over - techado

lemonade - limonada, gaseosa de limón, soda limonada

gingerbread - pan de jengibre, pan de especias

piles - pilas; montón, pila

The preaching was going on under the same kinds of sheds, only they was bigger and held crowds of people. The benches was made out of outside slabs of logs, with holes bored in the round side to drive sticks into for legs. They didn't have no backs. The preachers had high platforms to stand on at one end of the sheds. The women had on sun-bonnets; and some had linsey-woolsey frocks, some gingham ones, and a few of the young ones had on calico.

benches - bancos; banco

preachers - predicadores; predicador

bonnets - capós; capucha, gorra, cofia, capota, capó

frocks - vestidos; vestido

gingham - guinga

Some of the young men was barefooted, and some of the children didn't have on any clothes but just a tow-linen shirt. Some of the old women was knitting, and some of the young folks was courting on the sly.

barefooted - descalzo

courting - Cortejando; (court); patio, callejón, corte, tribunal, juzgado

The first shed we come to the preacher was lining out a hymn. He lined out two lines, everybody sung it, and it was kind of grand to hear it, there was so many of them and they done it in such a rousing way; then he lined out two more for them to sing"and so on. The people woke up more and more, and sung louder and louder; and towards the end some begun to groan, and some begun to shout. Then the preacher begun to preach, and begun in earnest, too; and went weaving first to one side of the platform and then the other, and then a-leaning down over the front of it, with his arms and his body going all the time, and shouting his words out with all his might; and every now and then he would hold up his Bible and spread it open, and kind of pass it around this way and that, shouting, "It's the brazen serpent in the wilderness!

rousing - conmovedor; despertar

groan - gimoteo; gemido, grunido, gemir, grunir

preach - predicar

weaving - tejer; tejido; (weave) tejer; tejido

brazen - descarado

serpent - serpiente

wilderness - salvajes; descampado, jungla, maleza, monte

Look upon it and live!" And people would shout out, "Glory!"A-a-men!" And so he went on, and the people groaning and crying and saying amen:

upon - sobre, en, tras

groaning - gimiendo; gemidor, gemebundo; (groan); gemido, grunido, gemir

Amen - amén

"Oh, come to the mourners'bench! come, black with sin! (amen!) come, sick and sore! (amen!) come, lame and halt and blind! (amen!) come, pore and needy, sunk in shame! (a-a-men!) come, all that's worn and soiled and suffering!

Bench - banco

sin - pecado

lame - cojo

halt - parar, detener

needy - necesitado, pobre, menesteroso

shame - vergüenza, pena

soiled - sucio; tierra, suelo

come with a broken spirit! come with a contrite heart! come in your rags and sin and dirt! the waters that cleanse is free, the door of heaven stands open"oh, enter in and be at rest!" (a-a-men! glory, glory hallelujah!)

contrite - contrito, arrepentido

cleanse - limpiar, lavar, purificar

Heaven - el cielo; cielo, firmamento, paraíso

hallelujah - aleluya, aleluya, felicitación, congratulación

And so on. You couldn't make out what the preacher said any more, on account of the shouting and crying. Folks got up everywheres in the crowd, and worked their way just by main strength to the mourners'bench, with the tears running down their faces; and when all the mourners had got up there to the front benches in a crowd, they sung and shouted and flung themselves down on the straw, just crazy and wild.

Well, the first I knowed the king got a-going, and you could hear him over everybody; and next he went a-charging up on to the platform, and the preacher he begged him to speak to the people, and he done it. He told them he was a pirate"been a pirate for thirty years out in the Indian Ocean"and his crew was thinned out considerable last spring in a fight, and he was home now to take out some fresh men, and thanks to goodness he'd been robbed last night and put ashore off of a steamboat without a cent, and he was glad of it; it was the blessedest thing that ever happened to him, because he was a changed man now, and happy for the first time in his life; and, poor as he was, he was going to start right off and work his way back to the Indian Ocean, and put in the rest of his life trying to turn the pirates into the true path; for he could do it better than anybody else, being acquainted with all pirate crews in that ocean; and though it would take him a long time to get there without money, he would get there anyway, and every time he convinced a pirate he would say to him, "Don't you thank me, don't you give me no credit; it all belongs to them dear people in Pokeville camp-meeting, natural brothers and benefactors of the race, and that dear preacher there, the truest friend a pirate ever had!

Indian - indio, hindú, indígena, indio, india

blessedest - bendito

pirates - piratas; pirata, bucanero, barco pirata, piratear

acquainted - conocido; dar a conocer, familiarizar

crews - tripulaciones; tripulación

Convinced - convencido; convencer

benefactors - enefactores; bienhechor, benefactor

And then he busted into tears, and so did everybody. Then somebody sings out, "Take up a collection for him, take up a collection!" Well, a half a dozen made a jump to do it, but somebody sings out, "Let him pass the hat around!" Then everybody said it, the preacher too.

collection - colección, conjunto, recogida, recolección, colecta, recaudación

When we got back to the raft and he come to count up he found he had collected eighty-seven dollars and seventy-five cents. And then he had fetched away a three-gallon jug of whisky, too, that he found under a wagon when he was starting home through the woods.

count up - contar, sumar

fetched away - soltarse

wagon - vagón; carro, coche

The king said, take it all around, it laid over any day he'd ever put in in the missionarying line. He said it warn't no use talking, heathens don't amount to shucks alongside of pirates to work a camp-meeting with.

missionarying - misionero

Heathens - heathens; pagano, bárbaro, pagano, pagana

The duke was thinking he'd been doing pretty well till the king come to show up, but after that he didn't think so so much. He had set up and printed off two little jobs for farmers in that printing-office"horse bills"and took the money, four dollars. And he had got in ten dollars'worth of advertisements for the paper, which he said he would put in for four dollars if they would pay in advance"so they done it. The price of the paper was two dollars a year, but he took in three subscriptions for half a dollar apiece on condition of them paying him in advance; they were going to pay in cordwood and onions as usual, but he said he had just bought the concern and knocked down the price as low as he could afford it, and was going to run it for cash.

farmers - agricultores; granjero, granjera

pay in - Pagar en

advance - avanzar, progresar, avance, progreso, adelanto, avance

subscriptions - suscripciones; abono, suscripción

on condition - condición

knocked down - Derribado

afford - pagar; costear, permitirse

He set up a little piece of poetry, which he made, himself, out of his own head"three verses"kind of sweet and saddish"the name of it was, "Yes, crush, cold world, this breaking heart""and he left that all set up and ready to print in the paper, and didn't charge nothing for it. Well, he took in nine dollars and a half, and said he'd done a pretty square day's work for it.

verses - versos; estrofa

saddish - Triste

crush - aplastamiento, enamoramiento, aplastar, destripar, machacar

charge - cargo, acusación, encargo, figura, acusar, cobrar, cargar

Then he showed us another little job he'd printed and hadn't charged for, because it was for us. It had a picture of a runaway nigger with a bundle on a stick over his shoulder, and "$200 reward" under it. The reading was all about Jim, and just described him to a dot. It said he run away from St.

bundle - haz, atado, fajo, atar, liar

Jacques'plantation, forty mile below New Orleans, last winter, and likely went north, and whoever would catch him and send him back he could have the reward and expenses.

plantation - plantación

"Now," says the duke, "after to-night we can run in the daytime if we want to. Whenever we see anybody coming we can tie Jim hand and foot with a rope, and lay him in the wigwam and show this handbill and say we captured him up the river, and were too poor to travel on a steamboat, so we got this little raft on credit from our friends and are going down to get the reward.

handbill - Panfleto

captured - capturado; captura, capturar

travel on - viajar

on credit - a crédito

Handcuffs and chains would look still better on Jim, but it wouldn't go well with the story of us being so poor. Too much like jewelry. Ropes are the correct thing"we must preserve the unities, as we say on the boards."

handcuffs - esposas, esposar

chains - cadenas; cadena, encadenar

jewelry - joyas

ropes - cuerdas; cuerda

preserve - mermelada, reserva, reserva natural, coto, terreno, dominio

unities - unidades; unidad

We all said the duke was pretty smart, and there couldn't be no trouble about running daytimes. We judged we could make miles enough that night to get out of the reach of the powwow we reckoned the duke's work in the printing office was going to make in that little town; then we could boom right along if we wanted to.

We laid low and kept still, and never shoved out till nearly ten o'clock; then we slid by, pretty wide away from the town, and didn't hoist our lantern till we was clear out of sight of it.

Hoist - izador; izar, aparejo

When Jim called me to take the watch at four in the morning, he says:

"Huck, does you reck'n we gwyne to run acrost any mo'kings on dis trip?"

"No," I says, "I reckon not."

"Well," says he, "dat's all right, den. I doan'mine one er two kings, but dat's enough. Dis one's powerful drunk, en de duke ain'much better."

I found Jim had been trying to get him to talk French, so he could hear what it was like; but he said he had been in this country so long, and had so much trouble, he'd forgot it.

CHAPTER XXI.

It was after sun-up now, but we went right on and didn't tie up. The king and the duke turned out by-and-by looking pretty rusty; but after they'd jumped overboard and took a swim it chippered them up a good deal. After breakfast the king he took a seat on the corner of the raft, and pulled off his boots and rolled up his britches, and let his legs dangle in the water, so as to be comfortable, and lit his pipe, and went to getting his Romeo and Juliet by heart. When he had got it pretty good him and the duke begun to practice it together.

chippered - astillado; en plena forma

dangle - colgar; pender

The duke had to learn him over and over again how to say every speech; and he made him sigh, and put his hand on his heart, and after a while he said he done it pretty well; "only," he says, "you mustn't bellow out Romeo! that way, like a bull"you must say it soft and sick and languishy, so"R-o-o-meo! that is the idea; for Juliet's a dear sweet mere child of a girl, you know, and she doesn't bray like a jackass."

bellow - abajo; bramido, berrido, bramar, berrear

languishy - Languidez

mere - simple, mero

bray - rebuzno

jackass - idiota; burro

Well, next they got out a couple of long swords that the duke made out of oak laths, and begun to practice the sword fight"the duke called himself Richard III.; and the way they laid on and pranced around the raft was grand to see. But by-and-by the king tripped and fell overboard, and after that they took a rest, and had a talk about all kinds of adventures they'd had in other times along the river.

laths - láminas; listón

pranced - hizo cabriolas; encabritarse

After dinner the duke says:

"Well, Capet, we'll want to make this a first-class show, you know, so I guess we'll add a little more to it. We want a little something to answer encores with, anyway."

encores - bises; bis, !otra!, !bis!

"What's onkores, Bilgewater?"

The duke told him, and then says:

"I'll answer by doing the Highland fling or the sailor's hornpipe; and you"well, let me see"oh, I've got it"you can do Hamlet's soliloquy."

fling - una aventura; arrojar, lanzar

hornpipe - chirimía

I've got it - Lo tengo

hamlet - aldehuela, caserío, aldea, villar

soliloquy - soliloquio

"Hamlet's which?"

"Hamlet's soliloquy, you know; the most celebrated thing in Shakespeare. Ah, it's sublime, sublime! Always fetches the house. I haven't got it in the book"I've only got one volume"but I reckon I can piece it out from memory. I'll just walk up and down a minute, and see if I can call it back from recollection's vaults."

Shakespeare - Shakespeare

fetches - ir por, ir a buscar, traer

volume - volumen

from memory - de memoria

recollection - Recuerdo

vaults - bóvedas; sótano; bodega

So he went to marching up and down, thinking, and frowning horrible every now and then; then he would hoist up his eyebrows; next he would squeeze his hand on his forehead and stagger back and kind of moan; next he would sigh, and next he'd let on to drop a tear. It was beautiful to see him. By-and-by he got it. He told us to give attention. Then he strikes a most noble attitude, with one leg shoved forwards, and his arms stretched away up, and his head tilted back, looking up at the sky; and then he begins to rip and rave and grit his teeth; and after that, all through his speech, he howled, and spread around, and swelled up his chest, and just knocked the spots out of any acting ever I see before.

frowning - frunciendo el ceno; fruncir el ceno

horrible - horrible, horrendo

hoist up - aIzar, levantar

stagger - trastabillar; tambalearse; (stag); ciervo, potro, potra

strikes - huelgas; tachar, borrar, golpear, pegar, acunar

noble - noble

attitude - postura, actitud

rave - delirar

Grit - arena, gravilla

howled - aulló; aullido, aullar, ganir

This is the speech"I learned it, easy enough, while he was learning it to the king:

To be, or not to be; that is the bare bodkin

bare - desnudo, descubierto

bodkin - un pasacintas

That makes calamity of so long life;

calamity - calamidad, panish: t-needed

For who would fardels bear, till Birnam Wood Do come to Dunsinane,

Do come - Ven

But that the fear of something after death Murders the innocent sleep,

murders - asesinatos; asesinato, asesinar, cepillarse, devorar

Great nature's second course,

And makes us rather sling the arrows of outrageous fortune

arrows - flechas; flecha

Than fly to others that we know not of.

There's the respect must give us pause:

respect - respeto, respetar

pause - receso, checkdescanso, pausar, interrumpir, suspender

Wake Duncan with thy knocking! I would thou couldst;

couldst - podrías

For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,

whips - látigos; fusta, látigo, flagelo, panish: t-needed

scorns - desprecios; despreciar, desdenar, menospreciar, rechazar

The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,

oppressor - opresor

contumely - injuria, ofensa, contumelia

The law's delay, and the quietus which his pangs might take.

delay - retraso; aplazar, retrasar

quietus - Silencio

pangs - angustias; punzada, dolor agudo

In the dead waste and middle of the night, when churchyards yawn

waste - residuos; desperdiciar, malgastar

yawn - bostezar, abrirse, bostezo

In customary suits of solemn black,

customary - costumbre; acostumbrado, consuetudinario, sólito

But that the undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns,

undiscovered - sin descubrir

Breathes forth contagion on the world,

breathes - respirar

contagion - contagio

And thus the native hue of resolution, like the poor cat i'the adage,

thus - así

native - natal, indígena, originario, nativo, oriundo, indígena

hue - color; matiz

resolution - resolución, panish: t-needed

adage - adagio, refrán, dicho

Is sicklied o'er with care.

sicklied - enfermo; enfermizo, enclenque, calamitoso, enteco

And all the clouds that lowered o'er our housetops,

lowered - bajado; oscurecerse, encapotarse

housetops - Cubierta

With this regard their currents turn awry,

regard - respecto a; considerar

currents - corrientes; corriente, actual

awry - mal; inadecuadamente, torcido

And lose the name of action.

'Tis a consummation devoutly to be wished.

But soft you, the fair Ophelia:

Ope not thy ponderous and marble jaws.

ponderous - pesado, torpe, beocio, grosero

marble - mármol, canica, balita

jaws - mandíbulas; maxilar

But get thee to a nunnery"go!

nunnery - un convento; convento

Well, the old man he liked that speech, and he mighty soon got it so he could do it first rate. It seemed like he was just born for it; and when he had his hand in and was excited, it was perfectly lovely the way he would rip and tear and rair up behind when he was getting it off.

The first chance we got, the duke he had some show bills printed; and after that, for two or three days as we floated along, the raft was a most uncommon lively place, for there warn't nothing but sword-fighting and rehearsing"as the duke called it"going on all the time.

rehearsing - Ensayando; (rehears) Ensayando

One morning, when we was pretty well down the State of Arkansaw, we come in sight of a little one-horse town in a big bend; so we tied up about three-quarters of a mile above it, in the mouth of a crick which was shut in like a tunnel by the cypress trees, and all of us but Jim took the canoe and went down there to see if there was any chance in that place for our show.

tunnel - túnel

We struck it mighty lucky; there was going to be a circus there that afternoon, and the country people was already beginning to come in, in all kinds of old shackly wagons, and on horses. The circus would leave before night, so our show would have a pretty good chance. The duke he hired the court house, and we went around and stuck up our bills. They read like this:

circus - circo

hired - contratado; alquilar

court house - el juzgado

Shaksperean Revival!!!

Wonderful Attraction!

Attraction - atracción

For One Night Only!

The world renowned tragedians,

tragedians - tragedias; tragediógrafo

David Garrick the younger, of Drury Lane Theatre, London,

David - David

and

Edmund Kean the elder, of the Royal Haymarket Theatre,

Royal - real

Whitechapel, Pudding Lane, Piccadilly, London, and the

pudding - pudin, pudín

Royal Continental Theatres, in their sublime

Continental - continental

Shaksperean Spectacle entitled

spectacle - espectáculo, papelón

entitled - con derecho; intitular

The Balcony Scene

in

Romeo and Juliet!!!

Romeo...................................... Mr. Garrick.

Juliet..................................... Mr. Kean.

Assisted by the whole strength of the company!

assisted - asistida; ayudar, asistir

New costumes, new scenery, new appointments!

scenery - paisaje, decorado

appointments - citas; nombramiento, cita, compromiso

Also:

The thrilling, masterly, and blood-curdling

thrilling - emocionante; excitar; emocionar, conmover

masterly - Magistral

curdling - uajada; (curdle); cuajar, coagular

Broad-sword conflict

conflict - conflicto, discrepancia, discrepar, estar renido, coincidir

In Richard III.!!!

Richard III................................ Mr. Garrick.

Richmond................................... Mr. Kean.

also:

(by special request,)

special request - una petición especial

Hamlet's Immortal Soliloquy!!

immortal - inmortal, inmortal

By the Illustrious Kean!

illustrious - ilustre, ínclito

Done by him 300 consecutive nights in Paris!

consecutive - consecutivo

For One Night Only,

On account of imperative European engagements!

imperative - imperativo, imperativo

engagements - ompromisos; compromiso, conexión, atención, noviazgo

Admission 25 cents; children and servants, 10 cents.

Then we went loafing around the town. The stores and houses was most all old shackly dried-up frame concerns that hadn't ever been painted; they was set up three or four foot above ground on stilts, so as to be out of reach of the water when the river was overflowed. The houses had little gardens around them, but they didn't seem to raise hardly anything in them but jimpson weeds, and sunflowers, and ash-piles, and old curled-up boots and shoes, and pieces of bottles, and rags, and played-out tin-ware. The fences was made of different kinds of boards, nailed on at different times; and they leaned every which-way, and had gates that didn't generly have but one hinge"a leather one.

loafing around - vaguear, holgazanear

dried-up - (dried-up) seco, resecado, desecado

concerns - preocupaciones; preocupación, referirse a, ataner, concernir

stilts - zancos; zanco, pilote, cigüenuela, mancera, esteva

weeds - Maleza; (weed) Maleza

sunflowers - girasoles; girasol, maravilla, tornasol, mirasol

ash - cenizas; ceniza

fences - vallas; cerca, cerramiento, barda, perista

nailed on - clavado

hinge - bisagra, gozne, charnela, quicio, abisagrar, depender

Some of the fences had been whitewashed, some time or another, but the duke said it was in Clumbus's time, like enough. There was generly hogs in the garden, and people driving them out.

All the stores was along one street. They had white domestic awnings in front, and the country people hitched their horses to the awning-posts. There was empty drygoods boxes under the awnings, and loafers roosting on them all day long, whittling them with their Barlow knives; and chawing tobacco, and gaping and yawning and stretching"a mighty ornery lot. They generly had on yellow straw hats most as wide as an umbrella, but didn't wear no coats nor waistcoats, they called one another Bill, and Buck, and Hank, and Joe, and Andy, and talked lazy and drawly, and used considerable many cuss words.

domestic - doméstico, nacional, empleada doméstica, empleada, malos tratos

awnings - toldos; toldo

drygoods - mercancías secas

loafers - Mocasín

whittling - Tallando; (whittle) Tallando

yawning - Bostezando; (yawn); bostezar, abrirse, bostezo

stretching - estirar, estirarse, dar, extenderse, estirón, estiramiento

straw hats - Sombreros de paja

waistcoats - chalecos; chaleco, chalequillo

There was as many as one loafer leaning up against every awning-post, and he most always had his hands in his britches-pockets, except when he fetched them out to lend a chaw of tobacco or scratch. What a body was hearing amongst them all the time was:

loafer - Mocasín

awning - toldo; (awn); arista

"Gimme a chaw 'v tobacker, Hank."

"Cain't; I hain't got but one chaw left. Ask Bill."

Maybe Bill he gives him a chaw; maybe he lies and says he ain't got none. Some of them kinds of loafers never has a cent in the world, nor a chaw of tobacco of their own.

They get all their chawing by borrowing; they say to a fellow, "I wisht you'd len'me a chaw, Jack, I jist this minute give Ben Thompson the last chaw I had""which is a lie pretty much everytime; it don't fool nobody but a stranger; but Jack ain't no stranger, so he says:

this minute - en este momento

everytime - Siempre

"You give him a chaw, did you? So did your sister's cat's grandmother. You pay me back the chaws you've awready borry'd off'n me, Lafe Buckner, then I'll loan you one or two ton of it, and won't charge you no back intrust, nuther."

awready - ya

borry - Burry

loan - préstamo

ton - tonelada

"Well, I did pay you back some of it wunst."

"Yes, you did"'bout six chaws. You borry'd store tobacker and paid back nigger-head."

paid back - pagar, devolver, reembolsar

Store tobacco is flat black plug, but these fellows mostly chaws the natural leaf twisted. When they borrow a chaw they don't generly cut it off with a knife, but set the plug in between their teeth, and gnaw with their teeth and tug at the plug with their hands till they get it in two; then sometimes the one that owns the tobacco looks mournful at it when it's handed back, and says, sarcastic:

gnaw - roer

tug - tirón; tirar, halar

sarcastic - sarcástico

"Here, gimme the chaw, and you take the plug."

All the streets and lanes was just mud; they warn't nothing else but mud"mud as black as tar and nigh about a foot deep in some places, and two or three inches deep in all the places. The hogs loafed and grunted around everywheres. You'd see a muddy sow and a litter of pigs come lazying along the street and whollop herself right down in the way, where folks had to walk around her, and she'd stretch out and shut her eyes and wave her ears whilst the pigs was milking her, and look as happy as if she was on salary. And pretty soon you'd hear a loafer sing out, "Hi! so boy!

lanes - carriles; camino, carril

tar - alquitrán, brea, chapapote

loafed - loafed; pan, barra

grunted - grunó; grunido, currito, machaca, grunir

sow - sembrar

litter - litera, artolas, camada, cama, lecho, detritus, basura

sick him, Tige!" and away the sow would go, squealing most horrible, with a dog or two swinging to each ear, and three or four dozen more a-coming; and then you would see all the loafers get up and watch the thing out of sight, and laugh at the fun and look grateful for the noise. Then they'd settle back again till there was a dog fight. There couldn't anything wake them up all over, and make them happy all over, like a dog fight"unless it might be putting turpentine on a stray dog and setting fire to him, or tying a tin pan to his tail and see him run himself to death.

squealing - chillando; (squeal); chillido, chirrido, rechinido, chillar

most horrible - el más horrible

grateful - agradecido, complacido

turpentine - pentina; aguarrás, trementina

stray - perderte; extraviarse, perderse

On the river front some of the houses was sticking out over the bank, and they was bowed and bent, and about ready to tumble in. The people had moved out of them.

sticking - Pegándose; (stick) Pegándose

The bank was caved away under one corner of some others, and that corner was hanging over. People lived in them yet, but it was dangersome, because sometimes a strip of land as wide as a house caves in at a time. Sometimes a belt of land a quarter of a mile deep will start in and cave along and cave along till it all caves into the river in one summer. Such a town as that has to be always moving back, and back, and back, because the river's always gnawing at it.

strip - tira; quitar, desprender; arrancar; despojar

caves - cuevas; cueva, caverna

gnawing - roer; corrosivo, punzante; insistente; (gnaw); roer

The nearer it got to noon that day the thicker and thicker was the wagons and horses in the streets, and more coming all the time. Families fetched their dinners with them from the country, and eat them in the wagons. There was considerable whisky drinking going on, and I seen three fights. By-and-by somebody sings out:

noon - mediodía

"Here comes old Boggs!"in from the country for his little old monthly drunk; here he comes, boys!"

monthly - mensual, mensualmente

All the loafers looked glad; I reckoned they was used to having fun out of Boggs. One of them says:

"Wonder who he's a-gwyne to chaw up this time. If he'd a-chawed up all the men he's ben a-gwyne to chaw up in the last twenty year he'd have considerable ruputation now."

ruputation - Ruptura

Another one says, "I wisht old Boggs 'd threaten me, 'cuz then I'd know I warn't gwyne to die for a thousan'year."

thousan - Mil

Boggs comes a-tearing along on his horse, whooping and yelling like an Injun, and singing out:

"Cler the track, thar. I'm on the waw-path, and the price uv coffins is a-gwyne to raise."

coffins - féretros; ataúd, féretro, cajón

He was drunk, and weaving about in his saddle; he was over fifty year old, and had a very red face. Everybody yelled at him and laughed at him and sassed him, and he sassed back, and said he'd attend to them and lay them out in their regular turns, but he couldn't wait now because he'd come to town to kill old Colonel Sherburn, and his motto was, "Meat first, and spoon vittles to top off on."

sassed - asesinado; descaro, descoco

Colonel - coronel

He see me, and rode up and says:

"Whar'd you come f'm, boy? You prepared to die?"

Then he rode on. I was scared, but a man says:

"He don't mean nothing; he's always a-carryin'on like that when he's drunk. He's the best naturedest old fool in Arkansaw"never hurt nobody, drunk nor sober."

carryin - Llevando

naturedest - Más natural

Boggs rode up before the biggest store in town, and bent his head down so he could see under the curtain of the awning and yells:

yells - grita; grito, alarido

"Come out here, Sherburn! Come out and meet the man you've swindled. You're the houn'I'm after, and I'm a-gwyne to have you, too!"

swindled - estafado; estafar, timar, tangar, petardear

And so he went on, calling Sherburn everything he could lay his tongue to, and the whole street packed with people listening and laughing and going on. By-and-by a proud-looking man about fifty-five"and he was a heap the best dressed man in that town, too"steps out of the store, and the crowd drops back on each side to let him come. He says to Boggs, mighty ca'm and slow"he says:

tongue - lengua, tsinhueso, lengüeta

heap - pila, montón, cúmulo, montículo, checkpila, amontonar

"I'm tired of this, but I'll endure it till one o'clock. Till one o'clock, mind"no longer. If you open your mouth against me only once after that time you can't travel so far but I will find you."

endure - soportar; aguantar, perdurar, tolerar, consentir, condescender

Then he turns and goes in. The crowd looked mighty sober; nobody stirred, and there warn't no more laughing. Boggs rode off blackguarding Sherburn as loud as he could yell, all down the street; and pretty soon back he comes and stops before the store, still keeping it up. Some men crowded around him and tried to get him to shut up, but he wouldn't; they told him it would be one o'clock in about fifteen minutes, and so he must go home"he must go right away.

But it didn't do no good. He cussed away with all his might, and throwed his hat down in the mud and rode over it, and pretty soon away he went a-raging down the street again, with his gray hair a-flying. Everybody that could get a chance at him tried their best to coax him off of his horse so they could lock him up and get him sober; but it warn't no use"up the street he would tear again, and give Sherburn another cussing. By-and-by somebody says:

raging - enfurecido; rabia, furor

coax - coaxial; engatusar

"Go for his daughter!"quick, go for his daughter; sometimes he'll listen to her. If anybody can persuade him, she can."

persuade - persuadir

So somebody started on a run. I walked down street a ways and stopped. In about five or ten minutes here comes Boggs again, but not on his horse. He was a-reeling across the street towards me, bare-headed, with a friend on both sides of him a-holt of his arms and hurrying him along. He was quiet, and looked uneasy; and he warn't hanging back any, but was doing some of the hurrying himself. Somebody sings out:

hurrying - Prisa; (hurry); prisa, apuro, apresurarse, apurarse, darse prisa

"Boggs!"

I looked over there to see who said it, and it was that Colonel Sherburn. He was standing perfectly still in the street, and had a pistol raised in his right hand"not aiming it, but holding it out with the barrel tilted up towards the sky. The same second I see a young girl coming on the run, and two men with her. Boggs and the men turned round to see who called him, and when they see the pistol the men jumped to one side, and the pistol-barrel come down slow and steady to a level"both barrels cocked. Boggs throws up both of his hands and says, "O Lord, don't shoot!

aiming - apuntando; apuntar

Bang! goes the first shot, and he staggers back, clawing at the air"bang! goes the second one, and he tumbles backwards on to the ground, heavy and solid, with his arms spread out. That young girl screamed out and comes rushing, and down she throws herself on her father, crying, and saying, "Oh, he's killed him, he's killed him!" The crowd closed up around them, and shouldered and jammed one another, with their necks stretched, trying to see, and people on the inside trying to shove them back and shouting, "Back, back! give him air, give him air!"

staggers - se tambalea; tambalearse

clawing - garra

tumbles - vueltas; caída, caer, revolverse

backwards - hacia atrás; atrasado, rezagado, subdesarrollado

screamed - gritó; grito, gritar

rushing - Prisa; (rush) Prisa

Colonel Sherburn he tossed his pistol on to the ground, and turned around on his heels and walked off.

tossed - lanzado; tiro, lanzamiento, lanzar una moneda al aire

They took Boggs to a little drug store, the crowd pressing around just the same, and the whole town following, and I rushed and got a good place at the window, where I was close to him and could see in. They laid him on the floor and put one large Bible under his head, and opened another one and spread it on his breast; but they tore open his shirt first, and I seen where one of the bullets went in.

pressing - presionando; apremiante

He made about a dozen long gasps, his breast lifting the Bible up when he drawed in his breath, and letting it down again when he breathed it out"and after that he laid still; he was dead. Then they pulled his daughter away from him, screaming and crying, and took her off. She was about sixteen, and very sweet and gentle looking, but awful pale and scared.

gasps - jadeos; jadear, bocanada, calada

breathed - respiró; respirar

Well, pretty soon the whole town was there, squirming and scrouging and pushing and shoving to get at the window and have a look, but people that had the places wouldn't give them up, and folks behind them was saying all the time, "Say, now, you've looked enough, you fellows; 'tain't right and 'tain't fair for you to stay thar all the time, and never give nobody a chance; other folks has their rights as well as you."

squirming - retorciéndose; serpentear, retorcerse, avergonzarse

scrouging - Gorrón

tain - ain

There was considerable jawing back, so I slid out, thinking maybe there was going to be trouble. The streets was full, and everybody was excited. Everybody that seen the shooting was telling how it happened, and there was a big crowd packed around each one of these fellows, stretching their necks and listening. One long, lanky man, with long hair and a big white fur stovepipe hat on the back of his head, and a crooked-handled cane, marked out the places on the ground where Boggs stood and where Sherburn stood, and the people following him around from one place to t'other and watching everything he done, and bobbing their heads to show they understood, and stooping a little and resting their hands on their thighs to watch him mark the places on the ground with his cane; and then he stood up straight and stiff where Sherburn had stood, frowning and having his hat-brim down over his eyes, and sung out, "Boggs!

jawing - Mandíbula; (jaw) Mandíbula

lanky - larguirucho

stovepipe - estufa

crooked - Corrupto; (crook) Corrupto

handled - manejado; mango; asa; manilla, pomo(puerta)

bobbing - meneándose; Beto

thighs - muslos; muslo, muslamen

brim - borde

and then fetched his cane down slow to a level, and says "Bang!" staggered backwards, says "Bang!" again, and fell down flat on his back. The people that had seen the thing said he done it perfect; said it was just exactly the way it all happened. Then as much as a dozen people got out their bottles and treated him.

staggered - escalonada; tambalearse

Well, by-and-by somebody said Sherburn ought to be lynched. In about a minute everybody was saying it; so away they went, mad and yelling, and snatching down every clothes-line they come to to do the hanging with.

snatching - arrebatamiento; agarrar, arrebatar, arrancada, arranque

CHAPTER XXII.

They swarmed up towards Sherburn's house, a-whooping and raging like Injuns, and everything had to clear the way or get run over and tromped to mush, and it was awful to see. Children was heeling it ahead of the mob, screaming and trying to get out of the way; and every window along the road was full of women's heads, and there was nigger boys in every tree, and bucks and wenches looking over every fence; and as soon as the mob would get nearly to them they would break and skaddle back out of reach.

swarmed - enjambrado; enjambre, nube, multitud, muchedumbre, masa

raging - enfurecido; trapo

Injuns - Un indio

mush - papilla, pasta

heeling - Escalando; (heel) Escalando

mob - mafia; banda, chusma

bucks - dólares; macho

wenches - mujeres; moza, criada, prostituta, negra, ir de putas

Lots of the women and girls was crying and taking on, scared most to death.

They swarmed up in front of Sherburn's palings as thick as they could jam together, and you couldn't hear yourself think for the noise. It was a little twenty-foot yard. Some sung out "tear down the fence! tear down the fence!" Then there was a racket of ripping and tearing and smashing, and down she goes, and the front wall of the crowd begins to roll in like a wave.

tear down - tirar abajo, destrozar, derribar

racket - jaleo, barullo, escándalo, alboroto

front wall - la pared frontal

roll in - llegar

Just then Sherburn steps out on to the roof of his little front porch, with a double-barrel gun in his hand, and takes his stand, perfectly ca'm and deliberate, not saying a word. The racket stopped, and the wave sucked back.

deliberate - deliberada; deliberado, a propósito, prudente, deliberar

Sherburn never said a word"just stood there, looking down. The stillness was awful creepy and uncomfortable. Sherburn run his eye slow along the crowd; and wherever it struck the people tried a little to out-gaze him, but they couldn't; they dropped their eyes and looked sneaky. Then pretty soon Sherburn sort of laughed; not the pleasant kind, but the kind that makes you feel like when you are eating bread that's got sand in it.

creepy - espeluznante, temible, perturbador, inquietante

gaze - mirada; observar, mirar fijamente

Sneaky - escurridizo, marrullero

Then he says, slow and scornful:

scornful - despreciativo

"The idea of you lynching anybody! It's amusing. The idea of you thinking you had pluck enough to lynch a man! Because you're brave enough to tar and feather poor friendless cast-out women that come along here, did that make you think you had grit enough to lay your hands on a man? Why, a man's safe in the hands of ten thousand of your kind"as long as it's daytime and you're not behind him.

lynching - linchamiento; (lynch); linchamiento

amusing - divertido; entretener, distraer, divertir

pluck - herir, desplumar, perseverancia

Brave - valiente, valeroso, corajudo

friendless - sin amigos

cast - moldear, elenco, castear, sondar, sondear, lanzar, lanzamiento

"Do I know you? I know you clear through. I was born and raised in the South, and I've lived in the North; so I know the average all around. The average man's a coward. In the North he lets anybody walk over him that wants to, and goes home and prays for a humble spirit to bear it. In the South one man all by himself, has stopped a stage full of men in the daytime, and robbed the lot.

Your newspapers call you a brave people so much that you think you are braver than any other people"whereas you're just as brave, and no braver. Why don't your juries hang murderers? Because they're afraid the man's friends will shoot them in the back, in the dark"and it's just what they would do.

braver - Más valiente; (brave); valiente, valeroso, corajudo

whereas - ientras que..; mientras que, siendo que, por cuanto, visto que

juries - jurados; jurado

"So they always acquit; and then a man goes in the night, with a hundred masked cowards at his back and lynches the rascal. Your mistake is, that you didn't bring a man with you; that's one mistake, and the other is that you didn't come in the dark and fetch your masks. You brought part of a man"Buck Harkness, there"and if you hadn't had him to start you, you'd a taken it out in blowing.

acquit - absolver, exculpar

masked - enmascarado; máscara, careta, mascarilla

rascal - granuja; pícaro, bribón, canalla

"You didn't want to come. The average man don't like trouble and danger. You don't like trouble and danger. But if only half a man"like Buck Harkness, there"shouts 'Lynch him! lynch him!'you're afraid to back down"afraid you'll be found out to be what you are"cowards"and so you raise a yell, and hang yourselves on to that half-a-man's coat-tail, and come raging up here, swearing what big things you're going to do. The pitifulest thing out is a mob; that's what an army is"a mob; they don't fight with courage that's born in them, but with courage that's borrowed from their mass, and from their officers.

swearing - jurando; (swear) jurando

pitifulest - ás lamentable

courage - coraje, valor, valentía

mass - montón, masa

But a mob without any man at the head of it is beneath pitifulness. Now the thing for you to do is to droop your tails and go home and crawl in a hole. If any real lynching's going to be done it will be done in the dark, Southern fashion; and when they come they'll bring their masks, and fetch a man along. Now leave"and take your half-a-man with you""tossing his gun up across his left arm and cocking it when he says this.

beneath - por debajo; bajo

pitifulness - Lástima

tails - colas; cola

southern - del sur, sureno, meridional, austral

cocking - golpeando; gallo, macho

The crowd washed back sudden, and then broke all apart, and went tearing off every which way, and Buck Harkness he heeled it after them, looking tolerable cheap. I could a stayed if I wanted to, but I didn't want to.

tearing off - arrancar, salir disparado

heeled - con tacón; talón

I went to the circus and loafed around the back side till the watchman went by, and then dived in under the tent. I had my twenty-dollar gold piece and some other money, but I reckoned I better save it, because there ain't no telling how soon you are going to need it, away from home and amongst strangers that way.

You can't be too careful. I ain't opposed to spending money on circuses when there ain't no other way, but there ain't no use in wasting it on them.

opposed - oponerse; oponer

circuses - circos; circo

It was a real bully circus. It was the splendidest sight that ever was when they all come riding in, two and two, a gentleman and lady, side by side, the men just in their drawers and undershirts, and no shoes nor stirrups, and resting their hands on their thighs easy and comfortable"there must a been twenty of them"and every lady with a lovely complexion, and perfectly beautiful, and looking just like a gang of real sure-enough queens, and dressed in clothes that cost millions of dollars, and just littered with diamonds.

bully - acosador; acosar

splendidest - el más espléndido; espléndido

drawers - cajones; cajón

undershirts - camisetas interiores; undershirt, camiseta interior

stirrups - estribos; estribo

Diamonds - diamantes; diamante

It was a powerful fine sight; I never see anything so lovely. And then one by one they got up and stood, and went a-weaving around the ring so gentle and wavy and graceful, the men looking ever so tall and airy and straight, with their heads bobbing and skimming along, away up there under the tent-roof, and every lady's rose-leafy dress flapping soft and silky around her hips, and she looking like the most loveliest parasol.

wavy - Ondulado

graceful - gracia; grácil, gracioso

airy - aireado; airoso

skimming - desnatando; (skim); sobrevolar rozando, rebotar, hojear

leafy - hojas; frondoso, foliáceo

flapping - leteo; solapa; faldón

silky - sedoso

hips - caderas; cadera

parasol - parasol, sombrilla

And then faster and faster they went, all of them dancing, first one foot out in the air and then the other, the horses leaning more and more, and the ringmaster going round and round the center-pole, cracking his whip and shouting "Hi!"hi!" and the clown cracking jokes behind him; and by-and-by all hands dropped the reins, and every lady put her knuckles on her hips and every gentleman folded his arms, and then how the horses did lean over and hump themselves!

ringmaster - maestro de ceremonias

going round - dando vueltas

whip - fusta, látigo, flagelo, panish: t-needed

clown - payaso, payasa, clown, clon

cracking jokes - contar chistes

reins - riendas; rienda

knuckles - nudillos; nudillo

lean - esbelta; inclinarse

And so one after the other they all skipped off into the ring, and made the sweetest bow I ever see, and then scampered out, and everybody clapped their hands and went just about wild.

scampered - escapó; zafarse, corretear

Well, all through the circus they done the most astonishing things; and all the time that clown carried on so it most killed the people. The ringmaster couldn't ever say a word to him but he was back at him quick as a wink with the funniest things a body ever said; and how he ever could think of so many of them, and so sudden and so pat, was what I couldn't noway understand. Why, I couldn't a thought of them in a year. And by-and-by a drunk man tried to get into the ring"said he wanted to ride; said he could ride as well as anybody that ever was. They argued and tried to keep him out, but he wouldn't listen, and the whole show come to a standstill. Then the people begun to holler at him and make fun of him, and that made him mad, and he begun to rip and tear; so that stirred up the people, and a lot of men begun to pile down off of the benches and swarm towards the ring, saying, "Knock him down! throw him out!" and one or two women begun to scream. So, then, the ringmaster he made a little speech, and said he hoped there wouldn't be no disturbance, and if the man would promise he wouldn't make no more trouble he would let him ride if he thought he could stay on the horse. So everybody laughed and said all right, and the man got on. The minute he was on, the horse begun to rip and tear and jump and cavort around, with two circus men hanging on to his bridle trying to hold him, and the drunk man hanging on to his neck, and his heels flying in the air every jump, and the whole crowd of people standing up shouting and laughing till tears rolled down.

most astonishing - el más sorprendente

wink - guino; guinar el ojo

Pat - palmadita, caricia

standstill - paralización; parada

holler - gritar

swarm - enjambre, nube, multitud, muchedumbre, masa

cavort - retozar, juguetear

bridle - brida

And at last, sure enough, all the circus men could do, the horse broke loose, and away he went like the very nation, round and round the ring, with that sot laying down on him and hanging to his neck, with first one leg hanging most to the ground on one side, and then t'other one on t'other side, and the people just crazy. It warn't funny to me, though; I was all of a tremble to see his danger. But pretty soon he struggled up astraddle and grabbed the bridle, a-reeling this way and that; and the next minute he sprung up and dropped the bridle and stood! and the horse a-going like a house afire too. He just stood up there, a-sailing around as easy and comfortable as if he warn't ever drunk in his life"and then he begun to pull off his clothes and sling them. He shed them so thick they kind of clogged up the air, and altogether he shed seventeen suits. And, then, there he was, slim and handsome, and dressed the gaudiest and prettiest you ever saw, and he lit into that horse with his whip and made him fairly hum"and finally skipped off, and made his bow and danced off to the dressing-room, and everybody just a-howling with pleasure and astonishment.

tremble - tiritar, temblar, temblor, vibración, temblequera

struggled - luchado; lucha, forcejeo, brega, luchar, esforzarse con denuedo

astraddle - a horcajadas

afire - fuego; ardiendo

clogged - obstruido; zueco, bloqueo, obstrucción, obstruir, azolvar

altogether - todos juntos; totalmente, completamente, en general, en suma

gaudiest - más llamativo; vistoso, llamativo, chillón

Hum - tararear, canturrear

astonishment - asombro, estupefacción, sorpresa, extraneza

Then the ringmaster he see how he had been fooled, and he was the sickest ringmaster you ever see, I reckon. Why, it was one of his own men! He had got up that joke all out of his own head, and never let on to nobody. Well, I felt sheepish enough to be took in so, but I wouldn't a been in that ringmaster's place, not for a thousand dollars.

sheepish - Tímido

I don't know; there may be bullier circuses than what that one was, but I never struck them yet. Anyways, it was plenty good enough for me; and wherever I run across it, it can have all of my custom every time.

bullier - bravucón, abusón, matón, abusador

custom - habituación, costumbre, usanza, a medida, especializado

Well, that night we had our show; but there warn't only about twelve people there"just enough to pay expenses. And they laughed all the time, and that made the duke mad; and everybody left, anyway, before the show was over, but one boy which was asleep. So the duke said these Arkansaw lunkheads couldn't come up to Shakespeare; what they wanted was low comedy"and maybe something ruther worse than low comedy, he reckoned.

lunkheads - Cabeza hueca

He said he could size their style. So next morning he got some big sheets of wrapping paper and some black paint, and drawed off some handbills, and stuck them up all over the village. The bills said:

wrapping paper - papel para envolver, papel de regalo

AT THE COURT HOUSE!

FOR 3 NIGHTS ONLY!

The World-Renowned Tragedians

DAVID GARRICK THE YOUNGER!

AND

EDMUND KEAN THE ELDER!

Of the London and Continental

Theatres,

In their Thrilling Tragedy of

THE KING'S CAMELOPARD

OR

THE ROYAL NONESUCH!!!

Admission 50 cents.

Then at the bottom was the biggest line of all"which said:

LADIES AND Children not admitted.

Children not admitted - No se admiten ninos

"There," says he, "if that line don't fetch them, I dont know Arkansaw!"

dont - No

CHAPTER XXIII.

Well, all day him and the king was hard at it, rigging up a stage and a curtain and a row of candles for footlights; and that night the house was jam full of men in no time. When the place couldn't hold no more, the duke he quit tending door and went around the back way and come on to the stage and stood up before the curtain and made a little speech, and praised up this tragedy, and said it was the most thrillingest one that ever was; and so he went on a-bragging about the tragedy, and about Edmund Kean the Elder, which was to play the main principal part in it; and at last when he'd got everybody's expectations up high enough, he rolled up the curtain, and the next minute the king come a-prancing out on all fours, naked; and he was painted all over, ring-streaked-and-striped, all sorts of colors, as splendid as a rainbow.

rigging up - armar

tending - tendiendo; guardar

Praised - elogiado; alabanza, loa, enaltecimiento, elogio, adoración

thrillingest - Más emocionante

bragging - presumiendo; fanfarronada, jactancia; (brag); fanfarronear

principal part - Parte principal

expectations - expectativas; expectación, expectativa

streaked - con rayas; raya, trazo, sarta, racha, ristra

striped - a rayas; franja, raya, línea, lista, galón

rainbow - arco iris, abanico, multicolor, policromático, irisado

And"but never mind the rest of his outfit; it was just wild, but it was awful funny. The people most killed themselves laughing; and when the king got done capering and capered off behind the scenes, they roared and clapped and stormed and haw-hawed till he come back and done it over again, and after that they made him do it another time. Well, it would make a cow laugh to see the shines that old idiot cut.

outfit - conjunto, atuendo, tenida

capering - haciendo cabriolas; juguetear, brincar

shines - brillar

idiot - idiota

Then the duke he lets the curtain down, and bows to the people, and says the great tragedy will be performed only two nights more, on accounts of pressing London engagements, where the seats is all sold already for it in Drury Lane; and then he makes them another bow, and says if he has succeeded in pleasing them and instructing them, he will be deeply obleeged if they will mention it to their friends and get them to come and see it.

instructing - instruyendo; instruir

deeply - profundamente; a fondo

Twenty people sings out:

"What, is it over? Is that all?"

The duke says yes. Then there was a fine time. Everybody sings out, "Sold!" and rose up mad, and was a-going for that stage and them tragedians. But a big, fine looking man jumps up on a bench and shouts:

"Hold on! Just a word, gentlemen." They stopped to listen. "We are sold"mighty badly sold. But we don't want to be the laughing stock of this whole town, I reckon, and never hear the last of this thing as long as we live. No. What we want is to go out of here quiet, and talk this show up, and sell the rest of the town!

Then we'll all be in the same boat. Ain't that sensible?" ("You bet it is!"the jedge is right!" everybody sings out.) "All right, then"not a word about any sell. Go along home, and advise everybody to come and see the tragedy."

sensible - razonable, sensato, sesudo

advise - aconsejar, asesorar, notificar

Next day you couldn't hear nothing around that town but how splendid that show was. House was jammed again that night, and we sold this crowd the same way. When me and the king and the duke got home to the raft we all had a supper; and by-and-by, about midnight, they made Jim and me back her out and float her down the middle of the river, and fetch her in and hide her about two mile below town.

The third night the house was crammed again"and they warn't new-comers this time, but people that was at the show the other two nights. I stood by the duke at the door, and I see that every man that went in had his pockets bulging, or something muffled up under his coat"and I see it warn't no perfumery, neither, not by a long sight. I smelt sickly eggs by the barrel, and rotten cabbages, and such things; and if I know the signs of a dead cat being around, and I bet I do, there was sixty-four of them went in.

crammed - atiborrado; atestar, atiborrar, embutir, chancar

comers - vienen; puntero, delantero, puntera, delantera

bulging - bombear; bulto, abultamiento, protuberancia, abultar

muffled - silenciado; mufla

sickly - enfermo; enfermizo, enclenque, calamitoso, enteco

rotten - podrido, estropeado, malo, putrefacto

cabbages - coles; repollo

I shoved in there for a minute, but it was too various for me; I couldn't stand it. Well, when the place couldn't hold no more people the duke he give a fellow a quarter and told him to tend door for him a minute, and then he started around for the stage door, I after him; but the minute we turned the corner and was in the dark he says:

various - varios, diversos, diferentes, distintos

tend - tender; guardar

"Walk fast now till you get away from the houses, and then shin for the raft like the dickens was after you!"

I done it, and he done the same. We struck the raft at the same time, and in less than two seconds we was gliding down stream, all dark and still, and edging towards the middle of the river, nobody saying a word. I reckoned the poor king was in for a gaudy time of it with the audience, but nothing of the sort; pretty soon he crawls out from under the wigwam, and says:

edging - Bordes; (edge); orilla, borde, lado, arista, ventaja, filo

crawls - se arrastra; avanzar lentamente

"Well, how'd the old thing pan out this time, duke?" He hadn't been up-town at all.

pan out - dar resultado, salir bien

We never showed a light till we was about ten mile below the village. Then we lit up and had a supper, and the king and the duke fairly laughed their bones loose over the way they'd served them people. The duke says:

"Greenhorns, flatheads! I knew the first house would keep mum and let the rest of the town get roped in; and I knew they'd lay for us the third night, and consider it was their turn now. Well, it is their turn, and I'd give something to know how much they'd take for it. I would just like to know how they're putting in their opportunity. They can turn it into a picnic if they want to"they brought plenty provisions."

Greenhorns - verdes; novicio, aprendiz, novato, pipiolo

roped - rodado; cuerda

Provisions - provisiones; provisión, aprovisionar, avituallar

Them rapscallions took in four hundred and sixty-five dollars in that three nights. I never see money hauled in by the wagon-load like that before. By-and-by, when they was asleep and snoring, Jim says:

hauled - arrastrado; empujar, tirar fuerte, llevar

"Don't it s'prise you de way dem kings carries on, Huck?"

carries on - continuar, seguir

"No," I says, "it don't."

"Why don't it, Huck?"

"Well, it don't, because it's in the breed. I reckon they're all alike."

"But, Huck, dese kings o'ourn is reglar rapscallions; dat's jist what dey is; dey's reglar rapscallions."

ourn - nuestro

"Well, that's what I'm a-saying; all kings is mostly rapscallions, as fur as I can make out."

"Is dat so?"

"You read about them once"you'll see. Look at Henry the Eight; this 'n 's a Sunday-school Superintendent to him. And look at Charles Second, and Louis Fourteen, and Louis Fifteen, and James Second, and Edward Second, and Richard Third, and forty more; besides all them Saxon heptarchies that used to rip around so in old times and raise Cain. My, you ought to seen old Henry the Eight when he was in bloom. He was a blossom. He used to marry a new wife every day, and chop off her head next morning. And he would do it just as indifferent as if he was ordering up eggs. ˜Fetch up Nell Gwynn,'he says. They fetch her up. Next morning, ˜Chop off her head!'And they chop it off. ˜Fetch up Jane Shore,'he says; and up she comes, Next morning, ˜Chop off her head'"and they chop it off. ˜Ring up Fair Rosamun.'Fair Rosamun answers the bell. Next morning, ˜Chop off her head.'And he made every one of them tell him a tale every night; and he kept that up till he had hogged a thousand and one tales that way, and then he put them all in a book, and called it Domesday Book"which was a good name and stated the case. You don't know kings, Jim, but I know them; and this old rip of ourn is one of the cleanest I've struck in history. Well, Henry he takes a notion he wants to get up some trouble with this country. How does he go at it"give notice?"give the country a show?

Charles - Carlos

James - Santiago, Jacobo, Yago, Jaime

Edward - Eduardo

Saxon - sajón, sajona

heptarchies - Heptarquía

raise Cain - armar la de San Quintín

bloom - florecer; flor

blossom - flor, floración, florecer

indifferent - indiferente

Jane - Juana

hogged - Cerdo

tales - cuentos; historia, relato

give notice - dar aviso

No. All of a sudden he heaves all the tea in Boston Harbor overboard, and whacks out a declaration of independence, and dares them to come on. That was his style"he never give anybody a chance. He had suspicions of his father, the Duke of Wellington. Well, what did he do? Ask him to show up? No"drownded him in a butt of mamsey, like a cat. S'pose people left money laying around where he was"what did he do? He collared it. S'pose he contracted to do a thing, and you paid him, and didn't set down there and see that he done it"what did he do? He always done the other thing. S'pose he opened his mouth"what then? If he didn't shut it up powerful quick he'd lose a lie every time. That's the kind of a bug Henry was; and if we'd a had him along 'stead of our kings he'd a fooled that town a heap worse than ourn done. I don't say that ourn is lambs, because they ain't, when you come right down to the cold facts; but they ain't nothing to that old ram, anyway. All I say is, kings is kings, and you got to make allowances. Take them all around, they're a mighty ornery lot. It's the way they're raised."

heaves - golpes; ondular

Boston - Boston

harbor - puerto

Independence - independencia

dares - te atreves; atraverse, osar

suspicions - sospechas; sospecha, suspicacia

butt - culo; dar un cabezazo

collared - con collar; cuello, collar, yugo

contracted - contratado; contraer

lambs - corderos; cordero, carne de cordero, borrego, borrega

ram - RAM, memoria RAM

allowances - subsidios; paga

"But dis one do smell so like de nation, Huck."

"Well, they all do, Jim. We can't help the way a king smells; history don't tell no way."

"Now de duke, he's a tolerble likely man in some ways."

tolerble - Tolerable

"Yes, a duke's different. But not very different. This one's a middling hard lot for a duke. When he's drunk there ain't no near-sighted man could tell him from a king."

sighted - vidente; vista, lugar de interés, espectáculo, panorama, visor

"Well, anyways, I doan'hanker for no mo'un um, Huck. Dese is all I kin stan'."

hanker - ansiar; querer

"It's the way I feel, too, Jim. But we've got them on our hands, and we got to remember what they are, and make allowances. Sometimes I wish we could hear of a country that's out of kings."

What was the use to tell Jim these warn't real kings and dukes? It wouldn't a done no good; and, besides, it was just as I said: you couldn't tell them from the real kind.

I went to sleep, and Jim didn't call me when it was my turn. He often done that. When I waked up just at daybreak he was sitting there with his head down betwixt his knees, moaning and mourning to himself. I didn't take notice nor let on. I knowed what it was about. He was thinking about his wife and his children, away up yonder, and he was low and homesick; because he hadn't ever been away from home before in his life; and I do believe he cared just as much for his people as white folks does for their'n.

mourning - duelo, luto; (mourn); lamentar, estar de luto

It don't seem natural, but I reckon it's so. He was often moaning and mourning that way nights, when he judged I was asleep, and saying, "Po'little 'Lizabeth! po'little Johnny! it's mighty hard; I spec'I ain't ever gwyne to see you no mo', no mo'!" He was a mighty good nigger, Jim was.

Johnny - Juanito

But this time I somehow got to talking to him about his wife and young ones; and by-and-by he says:

"What makes me feel so bad dis time 'uz bekase I hear sumpn over yonder on de bank like a whack, er a slam, while ago, en it mine me er de time I treat my little 'Lizabeth so ornery. She warn't on'y 'bout fo'year ole, en she tuck de sk'yarlet fever, en had a powful rough spell; but she got well, en one day she was a-stannin'aroun', en I says to her, I says:

sumpn - algo

powful - poderoso

stannin - Estannin

"˜Shet de do'.'

"She never done it; jis'stood dah, kiner smilin'up at me. It make me mad; en I says agin, mighty loud, I says:

kiner - kiner; familia, parientes

smilin - Sonriendo

"˜Doan'you hear me? Shet de do'!'

"She jis stood de same way, kiner smilin'up. I was a-bilin'! I says:

"˜I lay I make you mine!'

"En wid dat I fetch'her a slap side de head dat sont her a-sprawlin'. Den I went into de yuther room, en 'uz gone 'bout ten minutes; en when I come back dah was dat do'a-stannin'open yit, en dat chile stannin'mos'right in it, a-lookin'down and mournin', en de tears runnin'down. My, but I wuz mad! I was a-gwyne for de chile, but jis'den"it was a do'dat open innerds"jis'den, 'long come de wind en slam it to, behine de chile, ker-blam!"en my lan', de chile never move'! My breff mos'hop outer me; en I feel so"so"I doan'know how I feel. I crope out, all a-tremblin', en crope aroun'en open de do'easy en slow, en poke my head in behine de chile, sof'en still, en all uv a sudden I says pow! jis'as loud as I could yell.

sprawlin - expansión

mournin - Luto

innerds - Interiores

tremblin - Temblin

She never budge! Oh, Huck, I bust out a-cryin'en grab her up in my arms, en say, ˜Oh, de po'little thing! De Lord God Amighty fogive po'ole Jim, kaze he never gwyne to fogive hisself as long's he live!'Oh, she was plumb deef en dumb, Huck, plumb deef en dumb"en I'd ben a-treat'n her so!"

cryin - Llorando

hisself - Él mismo

plumb - A plomo

dumb - tonto; mudo

CHAPTER XXIV.

Next day, towards night, we laid up under a little willow tow-head out in the middle, where there was a village on each side of the river, and the duke and the king begun to lay out a plan for working them towns. Jim he spoke to the duke, and said he hoped it wouldn't take but a few hours, because it got mighty heavy and tiresome to him when he had to lay all day in the wigwam tied with the rope.

You see, when we left him all alone we had to tie him, because if anybody happened on to him all by himself and not tied it wouldn't look much like he was a runaway nigger, you know. So the duke said it was kind of hard to have to lay roped all day, and he'd cipher out some way to get around it.

He was uncommon bright, the duke was, and he soon struck it. He dressed Jim up in King Lear's outfit"it was a long curtain-calico gown, and a white horse-hair wig and whiskers; and then he took his theater paint and painted Jim's face and hands and ears and neck all over a dead, dull, solid blue, like a man that's been drownded nine days.

wig - peluca

Blamed if he warn't the horriblest looking outrage I ever see. Then the duke took and wrote out a sign on a shingle so:

horriblest - más horrible; horrible, horrendo

outrage - atrocidad, ultraje, desafuero, atropello, indignación, rabia

shingle - teja; guijarro

Sick Arab"but harmless when not out of his head.

Arab - árabe, árabe

harmless - inocuo, inofensivo

And he nailed that shingle to a lath, and stood the lath up four or five foot in front of the wigwam. Jim was satisfied. He said it was a sight better than lying tied a couple of years every day, and trembling all over every time there was a sound. The duke told him to make himself free and easy, and if anybody ever come meddling around, he must hop out of the wigwam, and carry on a little, and fetch a howl or two like a wild beast, and he reckoned they would light out and leave him alone.

meddling - injerencia; entrometerse, inmiscuirse, injerirse, mangonear

beast - bestia, animal, salvaje

Which was sound enough judgment; but you take the average man, and he wouldn't wait for him to howl. Why, he didn't only look like he was dead, he looked considerable more than that.

These rapscallions wanted to try the Nonesuch again, because there was so much money in it, but they judged it wouldn't be safe, because maybe the news might a worked along down by this time. They couldn't hit no project that suited exactly; so at last the duke said he reckoned he'd lay off and work his brains an hour or two and see if he couldn't put up something on the Arkansaw village; and the king he allowed he would drop over to t'other village without any plan, but just trust in Providence to lead him the profitable way"meaning the devil, I reckon. We had all bought store clothes where we stopped last; and now the king put his'n on, and he told me to put mine on.

Providence - providencia; Providence

profitable - rentable, provechoso, lucrativo, ventajoso

I done it, of course. The king's duds was all black, and he did look real swell and starchy. I never knowed how clothes could change a body before. Why, before, he looked like the orneriest old rip that ever was; but now, when he'd take off his new white beaver and make a bow and do a smile, he looked that grand and good and pious that you'd say he had walked right out of the ark, and maybe was old Leviticus himself. Jim cleaned up the canoe, and I got my paddle ready. There was a big steamboat laying at the shore away up under the point, about three mile above the town"been there a couple of hours, taking on freight. Says the king:

swell - genial; hinchar(se), inflar(se)

orneriest - más intratable; terco

beaver - castor

pious - piadoso

ark - arca

Leviticus - el levítico; Levítico

"Seein'how I'm dressed, I reckon maybe I better arrive down from St. Louis or Cincinnati, or some other big place. Go for the steamboat, Huckleberry; we'll come down to the village on her."

seein - Ves

I didn't have to be ordered twice to go and take a steamboat ride. I fetched the shore a half a mile above the village, and then went scooting along the bluff bank in the easy water. Pretty soon we come to a nice innocent-looking young country jake setting on a log swabbing the sweat off of his face, for it was powerful warm weather; and he had a couple of big carpet-bags by him.

scooting - scooting; largarse

swabbing - pasando el hisopo; hisopo, frotis

"Run her nose in shore," says the king. I done it. "Wher'you bound for, young man?"

"For the steamboat; going to Orleans."

"Git aboard," says the king. "Hold on a minute, my servant 'll he'p you with them bags. Jump out and he'p the gentleman, Adolphus""meaning me, I see.

I done so, and then we all three started on again. The young chap was mighty thankful; said it was tough work toting his baggage such weather. He asked the king where he was going, and the king told him he'd come down the river and landed at the other village this morning, and now he was going up a few mile to see an old friend on a farm up there. The young fellow says:

toting - llevando; acarrear

baggage - equipaje

"When I first see you I says to myself, ˜It's Mr. Wilks, sure, and he come mighty near getting here in time.'But then I says again, ˜No, I reckon it ain't him, or else he wouldn't be paddling up the river.'You ain't him, are you?"

"No, my name's Blodgett"Elexander Blodgett"Reverend Elexander Blodgett, I s'pose I must say, as I'm one o'the Lord's poor servants. But still I'm jist as able to be sorry for Mr. Wilks for not arriving in time, all the same, if he's missed anything by it"which I hope he hasn't."

Reverend - reverendo

"Well, he don't miss any property by it, because he'll get that all right; but he's missed seeing his brother Peter die"which he mayn't mind, nobody can tell as to that"but his brother would a give anything in this world to see him before he died; never talked about nothing else all these three weeks; hadn't seen him since they was boys together"and hadn't ever seen his brother William at all"that's the deef and dumb one"William ain't more than thirty or thirty-five. Peter and George were the only ones that come out here; George was the married brother; him and his wife both died last year. Harvey and William's the only ones that's left now; and, as I was saying, they haven't got here in time.

Peter - Pedro, Pedro

William - Guillermo

"Did anybody send 'em word?"

"Oh, yes; a month or two ago, when Peter was first took; because Peter said then that he sorter felt like he warn't going to get well this time. You see, he was pretty old, and George's g'yirls was too young to be much company for him, except Mary Jane, the red-headed one; and so he was kinder lonesome after George and his wife died, and didn't seem to care much to live. He most desperately wanted to see Harvey"and William, too, for that matter"because he was one of them kind that can't bear to make a will.

yirls - chicas

desperately - desesperadamente

make a will - hacer un testamento

He left a letter behind for Harvey, and said he'd told in it where his money was hid, and how he wanted the rest of the property divided up so George's g'yirls would be all right"for George didn't leave nothing. And that letter was all they could get him to put a pen to."

divided - dividido; desunir, dividir, repartir, división, divisoria

"Why do you reckon Harvey don't come? Wher'does he live?"

"Oh, he lives in England"Sheffield"preaches there"hasn't ever been in this country. He hasn't had any too much time"and besides he mightn't a got the letter at all, you know."

preaches - predicar

"Too bad, too bad he couldn't a lived to see his brothers, poor soul. You going to Orleans, you say?"

"Yes, but that ain't only a part of it. I'm going in a ship, next Wednesday, for Ryo Janeero, where my uncle lives."

"It's a pretty long journey. But it'll be lovely; wisht I was a-going. Is Mary Jane the oldest? How old is the others?"

"Mary Jane's nineteen, Susan's fifteen, and Joanna's about fourteen"that's the one that gives herself to good works and has a hare-lip."

Hare - liebre

"Poor things! to be left alone in the cold world so."

"Well, they could be worse off. Old Peter had friends, and they ain't going to let them come to no harm. There's Hobson, the Babtis'preacher; and Deacon Lot Hovey, and Ben Rucker, and Abner Shackleford, and Levi Bell, the lawyer; and Dr. Robinson, and their wives, and the widow Bartley, and"well, there's a lot of them; but these are the ones that Peter was thickest with, and used to write about sometimes, when he wrote home; so Harvey 'll know where to look for friends when he gets here.

Levi - Leví

Well, the old man went on asking questions till he just fairly emptied that young fellow. Blamed if he didn't inquire about everybody and everything in that blessed town, and all about the Wilkses; and about Peter's business"which was a tanner; and about George's"which was a carpenter; and about Harvey's"which was a dissentering minister; and so on, and so on. Then he says:

inquire - preguntar; investigar, informarse

blessed - bendecido; bendito; (bless) bendecido; bendito

tanner - Curtidor; (tan) Curtidor

Carpenter - carpintero, carpintera, ebanista

dissentering - disidente

minister - ministro

"What did you want to walk all the way up to the steamboat for?"

"Because she's a big Orleans boat, and I was afeard she mightn't stop there. When they're deep they won't stop for a hail. A Cincinnati boat will, but this is a St. Louis one."

hail - granizo

"Was Peter Wilks well off?"

"Oh, yes, pretty well off. He had houses and land, and it's reckoned he left three or four thousand in cash hid up som'ers."

"When did you say he died?"

"I didn't say, but it was last night."

"Funeral to-morrow, likely?"

"Yes, 'bout the middle of the day."

"Well, it's all terrible sad; but we've all got to go, one time or another. So what we want to do is to be prepared; then we're all right."

"Yes, sir, it's the best way. Ma used to always say that."

When we struck the boat she was about done loading, and pretty soon she got off. The king never said nothing about going aboard, so I lost my ride, after all. When the boat was gone the king made me paddle up another mile to a lonesome place, and then he got ashore and says:

"Now hustle back, right off, and fetch the duke up here, and the new carpet-bags. And if he's gone over to t'other side, go over there and git him. And tell him to git himself up regardless. Shove along, now."

hustle - apresurarse; darse prisa, apurarse, enganar, engrupir

regardless - a pesar de todo; en cualquier caso

I see what he was up to; but I never said nothing, of course. When I got back with the duke we hid the canoe, and then they set down on a log, and the king told him everything, just like the young fellow had said it"every last word of it.

And all the time he was a-doing it he tried to talk like an Englishman; and he done it pretty well, too, for a slouch. I can't imitate him, and so I ain't a-going to try to; but he really done it pretty good. Then he says:

Englishman - inglés

imitate - imitar

"How are you on the deef and dumb, Bilgewater?"

The duke said, leave him alone for that; said he had played a deef and dumb person on the histronic boards. So then they waited for a steamboat.

About the middle of the afternoon a couple of little boats come along, but they didn't come from high enough up the river; but at last there was a big one, and they hailed her. She sent out her yawl, and we went aboard, and she was from Cincinnati; and when they found we only wanted to go four or five mile they was booming mad, and gave us a cussing, and said they wouldn't land us. But the king was ca'm. He says:

hailed - aclamado; granizo

"If gentlemen kin afford to pay a dollar a mile apiece to be took on and put off in a yawl, a steamboat kin afford to carry 'em, can't it?"

So they softened down and said it was all right; and when we got to the village they yawled us ashore. About two dozen men flocked down when they see the yawl a-coming, and when the king says:

flocked - rebanado; rebano, bandada

"Kin any of you gentlemen tell me wher'Mr. Peter Wilks lives?" they give a glance at one another, and nodded their heads, as much as to say, "What d'I tell you?" Then one of them says, kind of soft and gentle:

glance - mirada; ojear, echar un vistazo, mirar, pispear, vistazo

nodded - asintió; asentir, cabecear, cabezada

"I'm sorry sir, but the best we can do is to tell you where he did live yesterday evening."

Sudden as winking the ornery old cretur went an to smash, and fell up against the man, and put his chin on his shoulder, and cried down his back, and says:

winking - guinando el ojo; (wink) guinando el ojo

"Alas, alas, our poor brother"gone, and we never got to see him; oh, it's too, too hard!"

Then he turns around, blubbering, and makes a lot of idiotic signs to the duke on his hands, and blamed if he didn't drop a carpet-bag and bust out a-crying. If they warn't the beatenest lot, them two frauds, that ever I struck.

idiotic - idiótico, idiota

Well, the men gathered around and sympathized with them, and said all sorts of kind things to them, and carried their carpet-bags up the hill for them, and let them lean on them and cry, and told the king all about his brother's last moments, and the king he told it all over again on his hands to the duke, and both of them took on about that dead tanner like they'd lost the twelve disciples.

gathered - reunidos; juntar, recoger, recolectar, acumular, reunir

sympathized with - compadecerse de alguien; empatizar con

disciples - discípulos; discípulo

Well, if ever I struck anything like it, I'm a nigger. It was enough to make a body ashamed of the human race.

CHAPTER XXV.

The news was all over town in two minutes, and you could see the people tearing down on the run from every which way, some of them putting on their coats as they come. Pretty soon we was in the middle of a crowd, and the noise of the tramping was like a soldier march. The windows and dooryards was full; and every minute somebody would say, over a fence:

tearing down - desmontando

dooryards - patio

"Is it them?"

And somebody trotting along with the gang would answer back and say:

trotting - al trote; (trot) al trote

"You bet it is."

When we got to the house the street in front of it was packed, and the three girls was standing in the door. Mary Jane was red-headed, but that don't make no difference, she was most awful beautiful, and her face and her eyes was all lit up like glory, she was so glad her uncles was come.

The king he spread his arms, and Mary Jane she jumped for them, and the hare-lip jumped for the duke, and there they had it! Everybody most, leastways women, cried for joy to see them meet again at last and have such good times.

meet again - volver a reunirse, volver a verse

Then the king he hunched the duke private"I see him do it"and then he looked around and see the coffin, over in the corner on two chairs; so then him and the duke, with a hand across each other's shoulder, and t'other hand to their eyes, walked slow and solemn over there, everybody dropping back to give them room, and all the talk and noise stopping, people saying "Sh!" and all the men taking their hats off and drooping their heads, so you could a heard a pin fall. And when they got there they bent over and looked in the coffin, and took one sight, and then they bust out a-crying so you could a heard them to Orleans, most; and then they put their arms around each other's necks, and hung their chins over each other's shoulders; and then for three minutes, or maybe four, I never see two men leak the way they done.

hunched - jorobado; corazonada, pálpito, intuición

chins - barbillas; barbilla, mentón

And, mind you, everybody was doing the same; and the place was that damp I never see anything like it. Then one of them got on one side of the coffin, and t'other on t'other side, and they kneeled down and rested their foreheads on the coffin, and let on to pray all to themselves. Well, when it come to that it worked the crowd like you never see anything like it, and everybody broke down and went to sobbing right out loud"the poor girls, too; and every woman, nearly, went up to the girls, without saying a word, and kissed them, solemn, on the forehead, and then put their hand on their head, and looked up towards the sky, with the tears running down, and then busted out and went off sobbing and swabbing, and give the next woman a show. I never see anything so disgusting.

damp - húmedo, humedad, amortiguar

kneeled down - Arrodillarse

foreheads - frente

Pray - rezar, orar

disgusting - asqueroso; repugnar, dar asco, asquear, asco, repugnancia

And the minute the words were out of his mouth somebody over in the crowd struck up the doxolojer, and everybody joined in with all their might, and it just warmed you up and made you feel as good as church letting out. Music is a good thing; and after all that soul-butter and hogwash I never see it freshen up things so, and sound so honest and bully.

letting out - dejar salir, soltar, liberar

hogwash - basura; tonterías, paparruchas, sinsentido

Bully - intimidador; bravucón, abusón, matón, abusador

Then the king begins to work his jaw again, and says how him and his nieces would be glad if a few of the main principal friends of the family would take supper here with them this evening, and help set up with the ashes of the diseased; and says if his poor brother laying yonder could speak he knows who he would name, for they was names that was very dear to him, and mentioned often in his letters; and so he will name the same, to wit, as follows, vizz.

jaw - mandíbula; maxilar

nieces - sobrinas; sobrina

principal - principal, capital, director, directora, principal de escuela

"Rev. Mr. Hobson, and Deacon Lot Hovey, and Mr. Ben Rucker, and Abner Shackleford, and Levi Bell, and Dr. Robinson, and their wives, and the widow Bartley.

Rev - acelerar

Rev. Hobson and Dr. Robinson was down to the end of the town a-hunting together"that is, I mean the doctor was shipping a sick man to t'other world, and the preacher was pinting him right. Lawyer Bell was away up to Louisville on business.

pinting - Pintando

But the rest was on hand, and so they all come and shook hands with the king and thanked him and talked to him; and then they shook hands with the duke and didn't say nothing, but just kept a-smiling and bobbing their heads like a passel of sapheads whilst he made all sorts of signs with his hands and said "Goo-goo"goo-goo-goo" all the time, like a baby that can't talk.

So the king he blattered along, and managed to inquire about pretty much everybody and dog in town, by his name, and mentioned all sorts of little things that happened one time or another in the town, or to George's family, or to Peter. And he always let on that Peter wrote him the things; but that was a lie: he got every blessed one of them out of that young flathead that we canoed up to the steamboat.

canoed - en canoa; canoa

Then Mary Jane she fetched the letter her father left behind, and the king he read it out loud and cried over it. It give the dwelling-house and three thousand dollars, gold, to the girls; and it give the tanyard (which was doing a good business), along with some other houses and land (worth about seven thousand), and three thousand dollars in gold to Harvey and William, and told where the six thousand cash was hid down cellar. So these two frauds said they'd go and fetch it up, and have everything square and above-board; and told me to come with a candle.

dwelling-house - (dwelling-house) vivienda

We shut the cellar door behind us, and when they found the bag they spilt it out on the floor, and it was a lovely sight, all them yaller-boys. My, the way the king's eyes did shine! He slaps the duke on the shoulder and says:

spilt - derramado; derramar, verter

shine - brillar

slaps - bofetadas; bofetada, cachetada, abofetear, cachetear, golpear

"Oh, this ain't bully nor noth'n! Oh, no, I reckon not! Why, Bilji, it beats the Nonesuch, don't it?"

The duke allowed it did. They pawed the yaller-boys, and sifted them through their fingers and let them jingle down on the floor; and the king says:

pawed - manoseado; pata, garra (gato), zarpa (león)

jingle - tintineo, retintín, sintonía

"It ain't no use talkin'; bein'brothers to a rich dead man and representatives of furrin heirs that's got left is the line for you and me, Bilge. Thish yer comes of trust'n to Providence. It's the best way, in the long run. I've tried 'em all, and ther'ain't no better way."

representatives - representantes; representante, representativo, representante

heirs - herederos; heredero, sucesor, checkheredera

bilge - billete; sentina

Most everybody would a been satisfied with the pile, and took it on trust; but no, they must count it. So they counts it, and it comes out four hundred and fifteen dollars short. Says the king:

"Dern him, I wonder what he done with that four hundred and fifteen dollars?"

They worried over that awhile, and ransacked all around for it. Then the duke says:

"Well, he was a pretty sick man, and likely he made a mistake"I reckon that's the way of it. The best way's to let it go, and keep still about it. We can spare it."

"Oh, shucks, yes, we can spare it. I don't k'yer noth'n 'bout that"it's the count I'm thinkin'about. We want to be awful square and open and above-board here, you know. We want to lug this h-yer money up stairs and count it before everybody"then ther'ain't noth'n suspicious. But when the dead man says ther's six thous'n dollars, you know, we don't want to""

lug - lugar; arrastrar

suspicious - sospechoso, suspicaz, desconfiado

thous - qué; vos

"Hold on," says the duke. "Le's make up the deffisit," and he begun to haul out yaller-boys out of his pocket.

"It's a most amaz'n'good idea, duke"you have got a rattlin'clever head on you," says the king. "Blest if the old Nonesuch ain't a heppin'us out agin," and he begun to haul out yaller-jackets and stack them up.

amaz - maz

blest - bendito; (bless) bendito

It most busted them, but they made up the six thousand clean and clear.

"Say," says the duke, "I got another idea. Le's go up stairs and count this money, and then take and give it to the girls."

"Good land, duke, lemme hug you! It's the most dazzling idea 'at ever a man struck. You have cert'nly got the most astonishin'head I ever see. Oh, this is the boss dodge, ther'ain't no mistake 'bout it. Let 'em fetch along their suspicions now if they want to"this 'll lay 'em out."

cert - Certificado

astonishin - Asombroso

When we got up-stairs everybody gethered around the table, and the king he counted it and stacked it up, three hundred dollars in a pile"twenty elegant little piles. Everybody looked hungry at it, and licked their chops. Then they raked it into the bag again, and I see the king begin to swell himself up for another speech. He says:

stacked - apilado; pila, montón, apilar

elegant - elegante, chic

chops - chuletas; cortar en trozos

"Friends all, my poor brother that lays yonder has done generous by them that's left behind in the vale of sorrers. He has done generous by these yer poor little lambs that he loved and sheltered, and that's left fatherless and motherless. Yes, and we that knowed him knows that he would a done more generous by 'em if he hadn't ben afeard o'woundin'his dear William and me. Now, wouldn't he? Ther'ain't no question 'bout it in my mind. Well, then, what kind o'brothers would it be that 'd stand in his way at sech a time? And what kind o'uncles would it be that 'd rob"yes, rob"sech poor sweet lambs as these 'at he loved so at sech a time? If I know William"and I think I do"he"well, I'll jest ask him.

vale - valle

sorrers - herradores

sheltered - refugiado; refugio, abrigo, amparo, asilo

more generous - más generoso

woundin - Herir

sech - ech

He turns around and begins to make a lot of signs to the duke with his hands, and the duke he looks at him stupid and leather-headed a while; then all of a sudden he seems to catch his meaning, and jumps for the king, goo-gooing with all his might for joy, and hugs him about fifteen times before he lets up. Then the king says, "I knowed it; I reckon that'll convince anybody the way he feels about it. Here, Mary Jane, Susan, Joanner, take the money"take it all. It's the gift of him that lays yonder, cold but joyful."

hugs - abrazos; abrazo, abrazar

convince - convencer

joyful - alegre, gozoso

Mary Jane she went for him, Susan and the hare-lip went for the duke, and then such another hugging and kissing I never see yet. And everybody crowded up with the tears in their eyes, and most shook the hands off of them frauds, saying all the time:

hugging - abrazo, abrazar

kissing - besando; besar

"You dear good souls!"how lovely!"how could you!"

good souls - almas buenas

Well, then, pretty soon all hands got to talking about the diseased again, and how good he was, and what a loss he was, and all that; and before long a big iron-jawed man worked himself in there from outside, and stood a-listening and looking, and not saying anything; and nobody saying anything to him either, because the king was talking and they was all busy listening. The king was saying"in the middle of something he'd started in on"

Loss - pérdida

jawed - mandíbula; maxilar

""they bein'partickler friends o'the diseased. That's why they're invited here this evenin'; but tomorrow we want all to come"everybody; for he respected everybody, he liked everybody, and so it's fitten that his funeral orgies sh'd be public."

respected - respetado; respeto, respetar

orgies - orgías; orgía

And so he went a-mooning on and on, liking to hear himself talk, and every little while he fetched in his funeral orgies again, till the duke he couldn't stand it no more; so he writes on a little scrap of paper, "obsequies, you old fool," and folds it up, and goes to goo-gooing and reaching it over people's heads to him. The king he reads it and puts it in his pocket, and says:

obsequies - Obsequio

folds - liegues; doblar, plegar

"Poor William, afflicted as he is, his heart's aluz right. Asks me to invite everybody to come to the funeral"wants me to make 'em all welcome. But he needn't a worried"it was jest what I was at."

afflicted - fligido; afligir

Then he weaves along again, perfectly ca'm, and goes to dropping in his funeral orgies again every now and then, just like he done before. And when he done it the third time he says:

weaves - tejer; trenzar

dropping in - pasar

"I say orgies, not because it's the common term, because it ain't"obsequies bein'the common term"but because orgies is the right term. Obsequies ain't used in England no more now"it's gone out. We say orgies now in England. Orgies is better, because it means the thing you're after more exact.

more exact - más exacto

It's a word that's made up out'n the Greek orgo, outside, open, abroad; and the Hebrew jeesum, to plant, cover up; hence inter. So, you see, funeral orgies is an open er public funeral."

Greek - griego, griego, griega

Hebrew - hebreo, hebreo, hebrea

hence - de aquí, por lo tanto, por eso, de ahí

inter - enterrar

He was the worst I ever struck. Well, the iron-jawed man he laughed right in his face. Everybody was shocked. Everybody says, "Why, doctor!" and Abner Shackleford says:

shocked - sorprendido; conmoción, golpe

"Why, Robinson, hain't you heard the news? This is Harvey Wilks."

The king he smiled eager, and shoved out his flapper, and says:

eager - ávido, ansioso, deseoso

"Is it my poor brother's dear good friend and physician? I""

physician - médico, médica, facultativo

"Keep your hands off of me!" says the doctor. "You talk like an Englishman, don't you? It's the worst imitation I ever heard. You Peter Wilks's brother! You're a fraud, that's what you are!"

imitation - imitación

fraud - fraude, defraudador

Well, how they all took on! They crowded around the doctor and tried to quiet him down, and tried to explain to him and tell him how Harvey 'd showed in forty ways that he was Harvey, and knowed everybody by name, and the names of the very dogs, and begged and begged him not to hurt Harvey's feelings and the poor girl's feelings, and all that. But it warn't no use; he stormed right along, and said any man that pretended to be an Englishman and couldn't imitate the lingo no better than what he did was a fraud and a liar. The poor girls was hanging to the king and crying; and all of a sudden the doctor ups and turns on them.

showed in - mostrar el camino; presentar

feelings - Sentimientos

lingo - lengua; jerga

liar - mentiroso, mentirosa, embustero, embustera

He says:

"I was your father's friend, and I'm your friend; and I warn you as a friend, and an honest one that wants to protect you and keep you out of harm and trouble, to turn your backs on that scoundrel and have nothing to do with him, the ignorant tramp, with his idiotic Greek and Hebrew, as he calls it. He is the thinnest kind of an impostor"has come here with a lot of empty names and facts which he picked up somewheres, and you take them for proofs, and are helped to fool yourselves by these foolish friends here, who ought to know better. Mary Jane Wilks, you know me for your friend, and for your unselfish friend, too. Now listen to me; turn this pitiful rascal out"I beg you to do it.

scoundrel - sinvergüenza; bribón, canalla, bellaco, villano

impostor - impostor, impostora

proofs - pruebas; prueba

foolish - tonto, necio, imprudente

unselfish - altruista, desprendido, generoso

pitiful - lastimoso, lastimero, lamentable

Will you?"

Mary Jane straightened herself up, and my, but she was handsome! She says:

"Here is my answer." She hove up the bag of money and put it in the king's hands, and says, "Take this six thousand dollars, and invest for me and my sisters any way you want to, and don't give us no receipt for it."

receipt - recepción, recibo, resguardo, ticket, tíquet, receta

Then she put her arm around the king on one side, and Susan and the hare-lip done the same on the other. Everybody clapped their hands and stomped on the floor like a perfect storm, whilst the king held up his head and smiled proud. The doctor says:

stomped - pisado; pisotear

"All right; I wash my hands of the matter. But I warn you all that a time 's coming when you're going to feel sick whenever you think of this day." And away he went.

"All right, doctor," says the king, kinder mocking him; "we'll try and get 'em to send for you;" which made them all laugh, and they said it was a prime good hit.

mocking - burlándose; burlón; (moc) burlándose; burlón

send for - ir a buscar a, mandar a buscar a; hacer traer

CHAPTER XXVI.

Well, when they was all gone the king he asks Mary Jane how they was off for spare rooms, and she said she had one spare room, which would do for Uncle William, and she'd give her own room to Uncle Harvey, which was a little bigger, and she would turn into the room with her sisters and sleep on a cot; and up garret was a little cubby, with a pallet in it. The king said the cubby would do for his valley"meaning me.

cot - cuna

garret - buhardilla

pallet - Palé

So Mary Jane took us up, and she showed them their rooms, which was plain but nice. She said she'd have her frocks and a lot of other traps took out of her room if they was in Uncle Harvey's way, but he said they warn't. The frocks was hung along the wall, and before them was a curtain made out of calico that hung down to the floor. There was an old hair trunk in one corner, and a guitar-box in another, and all sorts of little knickknacks and jimcracks around, like girls brisken up a room with. The king said it was all the more homely and more pleasanter for these fixings, and so don't disturb them.

knickknacks - chuchería

homely - ogareno; hogareno

pleasanter - más agradable; agradable, placentero

fixings - Arreglando

disturb - perturbar, molestar

The duke's room was pretty small, but plenty good enough, and so was my cubby.

That night they had a big supper, and all them men and women was there, and I stood behind the king and the duke's chairs and waited on them, and the niggers waited on the rest. Mary Jane she set at the head of the table, with Susan alongside of her, and said how bad the biscuits was, and how mean the preserves was, and how ornery and tough the fried chickens was"and all that kind of rot, the way women always do for to force out compliments; and the people all knowed everything was tiptop, and said so"said "How do you get biscuits to brown so nice?

preserves - conservas; mermelada, reserva, reserva natural, coto, terreno

compliments - cumplidos; cumplido, felicitar, cumplimentar

tiptop - Toptop

and "Where, for the land's sake, did you get these amaz'n pickles?" and all that kind of humbug talky-talk, just the way people always does at a supper, you know.

sake - por, por motivo de; por el bien de

pickles - encurtidos; encurtido

humbug - tonterías; farsa, disparate, tontería, bobería, fraude

talky - Hablador

And when it was all done me and the hare-lip had supper in the kitchen off of the leavings, whilst the others was helping the niggers clean up the things. The hare-lip she got to pumping me about England, and blest if I didn't think the ice was getting mighty thin sometimes. She says:

leavings - Irse

pumping - bombeando; bomba

"Did you ever see the king?"

"Who? William Fourth? Well, I bet I have"he goes to our church." I knowed he was dead years ago, but I never let on. So when I says he goes to our church, she says:

"What"regular?"

"Yes"regular. His pew's right over opposite ourn"on t'other side the pulpit."

pew - banco de iglesia

pulpit - púlpito

"I thought he lived in London?"

"Well, he does. Where would he live?"

"But I thought you lived in Sheffield?"

I see I was up a stump. I had to let on to get choked with a chicken bone, so as to get time to think how to get down again. Then I says:

choked - ahogado; ahogar, asfixiar

"I mean he goes to our church regular when he's in Sheffield. That's only in the summer time, when he comes there to take the sea baths."

"Why, how you talk"Sheffield ain't on the sea."

"Well, who said it was?"

"Why, you did."

"I didn't nuther."

"You did!"

"I didn't."

"You did."

"I never said nothing of the kind."

"Well, what did you say, then?"

"Said he come to take the sea baths"that's what I said."

"Well, then, how's he going to take the sea baths if it ain't on the sea?"

"Looky here," I says; "did you ever see any Congress-water?"

Congress - congreso

"Yes."

"Well, did you have to go to Congress to get it?"

"Why, no."

"Well, neither does William Fourth have to go to the sea to get a sea bath."

"How does he get it, then?"

"Gets it the way people down here gets Congress-water"in barrels. There in the palace at Sheffield they've got furnaces, and he wants his water hot. They can't bile that amount of water away off there at the sea. They haven't got no conveniences for it."

in barrels - en barriles

furnaces - hornos; horno, caldera, calefacción

bile - bilis, hiel

conveniences - omodidades; conveniencia, comodidad

"Oh, I see, now. You might a said that in the first place and saved time."

When she said that I see I was out of the woods again, and so I was comfortable and glad. Next, she says:

"Do you go to church, too?"

"Yes"regular."

"Where do you set?"

"Why, in our pew."

"Whose pew?"

"Why, ourn"your Uncle Harvey's."

"His'n? What does he want with a pew?"

"Wants it to set in. What did you reckon he wanted with it?"

"Why, I thought he'd be in the pulpit."

Rot him, I forgot he was a preacher. I see I was up a stump again, so I played another chicken bone and got another think. Then I says:

"Blame it, do you suppose there ain't but one preacher to a church?"

"Why, what do they want with more?"

"What!"to preach before a king? I never did see such a girl as you. They don't have no less than seventeen."

"Seventeen! My land! Why, I wouldn't set out such a string as that, not if I never got to glory. It must take 'em a week."

"Shucks, they don't all of 'em preach the same day"only one of 'em."

"Well, then, what does the rest of 'em do?"

"Oh, nothing much. Loll around, pass the plate"and one thing or another. But mainly they don't do nothing."

loll - recostarse, arrellanarse, repanchingarse, repanchigarse

"Well, then, what are they for?"

"Why, they're for style. Don't you know nothing?"

"Well, I don't want to know no such foolishness as that. How is servants treated in England? Do they treat 'em better 'n we treat our niggers?"

"No! A servant ain't nobody there. They treat them worse than dogs."

"Don't they give 'em holidays, the way we do, Christmas and New Year's week, and Fourth of July?"

Christmas - Navidad

"Oh, just listen! A body could tell you hain't ever been to England by that. Why, Hare-l"why, Joanna, they never see a holiday from year's end to year's end; never go to the circus, nor theater, nor nigger shows, nor nowheres."

"Nor church?"

"Nor church."

"But you always went to church."

Well, I was gone up again. I forgot I was the old man's servant. But next minute I whirled in on a kind of an explanation how a valley was different from a common servant and had to go to church whether he wanted to or not, and set with the family, on account of its being the law. But I didn't do it pretty good, and when I got done I see she warn't satisfied. She says:

"Honest injun, now, hain't you been telling me a lot of lies?"

"Honest injun," says I.

"None of it at all?"

"None of it at all. Not a lie in it," says I.

"Lay your hand on this book and say it."

I see it warn't nothing but a dictionary, so I laid my hand on it and said it. So then she looked a little better satisfied, and says:

"Well, then, I'll believe some of it; but I hope to gracious if I'll believe the rest."

"What is it you won't believe, Joe?" says Mary Jane, stepping in with Susan behind her. "It ain't right nor kind for you to talk so to him, and him a stranger and so far from his people. How would you like to be treated so?"

"That's always your way, Maim"always sailing in to help somebody before they're hurt. I hain't done nothing to him. He's told some stretchers, I reckon, and I said I wouldn't swallow it all; and that's every bit and grain I did say. I reckon he can stand a little thing like that, can't he?"

maim - mutilar

swallow - tragar, engullir

grain - grano

"I don't care whether 'twas little or whether 'twas big; he's here in our house and a stranger, and it wasn't good of you to say it. If you was in his place it would make you feel ashamed; and so you oughtn't to say a thing to another person that will make them feel ashamed."

feel ashamed - sentirse avergonzado

oughtn - no debería

"Why, Mam, he said""

"It don't make no difference what he said"that ain't the thing. The thing is for you to treat him kind, and not be saying things to make him remember he ain't in his own country and amongst his own folks."

I says to myself, this is a girl that I'm letting that old reptile rob her of her money!

reptile - reptil

Then Susan she waltzed in; and if you'll believe me, she did give Hare-lip hark from the tomb!

waltzed - bailó el vals; vals, valsar, bailar vals

Hark - Oyes

tomb - tumba

Says I to myself, and this is another one that I'm letting him rob her of her money!

Then Mary Jane she took another inning, and went in sweet and lovely again"which was her way; but when she got done there warn't hardly anything left o'poor Hare-lip. So she hollered.

"All right, then," says the other girls; "you just ask his pardon."

Pardon - perdón, indulto, perdonar, indultar, cómo?, ?perdón?, ?ah?

She done it, too; and she done it beautiful. She done it so beautiful it was good to hear; and I wished I could tell her a thousand lies, so she could do it again.

I says to myself, this is another one that I'm letting him rob her of her money. And when she got through they all jest laid theirselves out to make me feel at home and know I was amongst friends. I felt so ornery and low down and mean that I says to myself, my mind's made up; I'll hive that money for them or bust.

theirselves - Ellos mismos

So then I lit out"for bed, I said, meaning some time or another. When I got by myself I went to thinking the thing over. I says to myself, shall I go to that doctor, private, and blow on these frauds? No"that won't do. He might tell who told him; then the king and the duke would make it warm for me. Shall I go, private, and tell Mary Jane? No"I dasn't do it. Her face would give them a hint, sure; they've got the money, and they'd slide right out and get away with it. If she was to fetch in help I'd get mixed up in the business before it was done with, I judge. No; there ain't no good way but one. I got to steal that money, somehow; and I got to steal it some way that they won't suspicion that I done it.

hint - insinuación; pista, indicio, indirecta, buscapié, toque

They've got a good thing here, and they ain't a-going to leave till they've played this family and this town for all they're worth, so I'll find a chance time enough. I'll steal it and hide it; and by-and-by, when I'm away down the river, I'll write a letter and tell Mary Jane where it's hid. But I better hive it tonight if I can, because the doctor maybe hasn't let up as much as he lets on he has; he might scare them out of here yet.

So, thinks I, I'll go and search them rooms. Upstairs the hall was dark, but I found the duke's room, and started to paw around it with my hands; but I recollected it wouldn't be much like the king to let anybody else take care of that money but his own self; so then I went to his room and begun to paw around there. But I see I couldn't do nothing without a candle, and I dasn't light one, of course.

paw - pata, garra (gato), zarpa (león)

recollected - recuerdas; recordar, acordarse de

So I judged I'd got to do the other thing"lay for them and eavesdrop. About that time I hears their footsteps coming, and was going to skip under the bed; I reached for it, but it wasn't where I thought it would be; but I touched the curtain that hid Mary Jane's frocks, so I jumped in behind that and snuggled in amongst the gowns, and stood there perfectly still.

Footsteps - pasos; huella, paso

skip - saltar

snuggled - acurrucado; acurrucarse

They come in and shut the door; and the first thing the duke done was to get down and look under the bed. Then I was glad I hadn't found the bed when I wanted it. And yet, you know, it's kind of natural to hide under the bed when you are up to anything private. They sets down then, and the king says:

"Well, what is it? And cut it middlin'short, because it's better for us to be down there a-whoopin'up the mournin'than up here givin''em a chance to talk us over."

givin - dando

"Well, this is it, Capet. I ain't easy; I ain't comfortable. That doctor lays on my mind. I wanted to know your plans. I've got a notion, and I think it's a sound one."

"What is it, duke?"

"That we better glide out of this before three in the morning, and clip it down the river with what we've got. Specially, seeing we got it so easy"given back to us, flung at our heads, as you may say, when of course we allowed to have to steal it back. I'm for knocking off and lighting out."

glide - deslizarse; deslizar, planear

clip - cortar

specially - especialmente

given back - devolver algo (a alguien)

knocking off - acabar; copiar, piratear; pirarase

That made me feel pretty bad. About an hour or two ago it would a been a little different, but now it made me feel bad and disappointed, The king rips out and says:

rips - desgarros; rasgar, desgarrar

"What! And not sell out the rest o'the property? March off like a passel of fools and leave eight or nine thous'n'dollars'worth o'property layin'around jest sufferin'to be scooped in?"and all good, salable stuff, too."

sell out - Venderse

fools - idiotas; bobo, imbécil, necio, pendejo, bufón, loco

scooped - cogido; cucharón, sacabolas de helado, cucharazo, cucharada

salable - Vendible

The duke he grumbled; said the bag of gold was enough, and he didn't want to go no deeper"didn't want to rob a lot of orphans of everything they had.

Orphans - huérfanos; huérfano, huérfana

"Why, how you talk!" says the king. "We sha'n't rob 'em of nothing at all but jest this money. The people that buys the property is the suff'rers; because as soon 's it's found out 'at we didn't own it"which won't be long after we've slid"the sale won't be valid, and it 'll all go back to the estate.

suff - Suficiente

rers - ers

be valid - ser válido

estate - patrimonio; propiedad, inmueble, bien, estamento, finca

These yer orphans 'll git their house back agin, and that's enough for them; they're young and spry, and k'n easy earn a livin'. They ain't a-goin to suffer. Why, jest think"there's thous'n's and thous'n's that ain't nigh so well off. Bless you, they ain't got noth'n'to complain of."

livin - Vivir

Well, the king he talked him blind; so at last he give in, and said all right, but said he believed it was blamed foolishness to stay, and that doctor hanging over them. But the king says:

"Cuss the doctor! What do we k'yer for him? Hain't we got all the fools in town on our side? And ain't that a big enough majority in any town?"

majority - mayoría, mayoría de edad

So they got ready to go down stairs again. The duke says:

"I don't think we put that money in a good place."

That cheered me up. I'd begun to think I warn't going to get a hint of no kind to help me. The king says:

"Why?"

"Because Mary Jane 'll be in mourning from this out; and first you know the nigger that does up the rooms will get an order to box these duds up and put 'em away; and do you reckon a nigger can run across money and not borrow some of it?"

does up - abrochar, renovar, decorar, envolver

"Your head's level agin, duke," says the king; and he comes a-fumbling under the curtain two or three foot from where I was. I stuck tight to the wall and kept mighty still, though quivery; and I wondered what them fellows would say to me if they catched me; and I tried to think what I'd better do if they did catch me. But the king he got the bag before I could think more than about a half a thought, and he never suspicioned I was around.

fumbling - buscar/revolver a tientas/torpemente, manejar torpemente

quivery - Tiemblo

suspicioned - sospechas; sospecha, suspicacia

They took and shoved the bag through a rip in the straw tick that was under the feather-bed, and crammed it in a foot or two amongst the straw and said it was all right now, because a nigger only makes up the feather-bed, and don't turn over the straw tick only about twice a year, and so it warn't in no danger of getting stole now.

feather-bed - (feather-bed) Colchón de plumas

But I knowed better. I had it out of there before they was half-way down stairs. I groped along up to my cubby, and hid it there till I could get a chance to do better. I judged I better hide it outside of the house somewheres, because if they missed it they would give the house a good ransacking: I knowed that very well. Then I turned in, with my clothes all on; but I couldn't a gone to sleep if I'd a wanted to, I was in such a sweat to get through with the business.

groped - palpar, tantear, buscar a tientas, manosear, meter mano

ransacking - raqueo; saquear, desvalijar, escudrinar

By-and-by I heard the king and the duke come up; so I rolled off my pallet and laid with my chin at the top of my ladder, and waited to see if anything was going to happen. But nothing did.

ladder - escalera, escalafón, carrera

So I held on till all the late sounds had quit and the early ones hadn't begun yet; and then I slipped down the ladder.

CHAPTER XXVII.

I crept to their doors and listened; they was snoring. So I tiptoed along, and got down stairs all right. There warn't a sound anywheres. I peeped through a crack of the dining-room door, and see the men that was watching the corpse all sound asleep on their chairs. The door was open into the parlor, where the corpse was laying, and there was a candle in both rooms. I passed along, and the parlor door was open; but I see there warn't nobody in there but the remainders of Peter; so I shoved on by; but the front door was locked, and the key wasn't there.

tiptoed - punta del pie, caminar de puntillas

dining - cenar; jaleo

Just then I heard somebody coming down the stairs, back behind me. I run in the parlor and took a swift look around, and the only place I see to hide the bag was in the coffin. The lid was shoved along about a foot, showing the dead man's face down in there, with a wet cloth over it, and his shroud on. I tucked the money-bag in under the lid, just down beyond where his hands was crossed, which made me creep, they was so cold, and then I run back across the room and in behind the door.

face down - boca abajo

cloth - tela, pedazo de tela, trozo de tela, trapo, pano, facha

shroud - mortaja

beyond - más allá de

creep - se arrastran; reptar, hormigueo, fatiga

The person coming was Mary Jane. She went to the coffin, very soft, and kneeled down and looked in; then she put up her handkerchief, and I see she begun to cry, though I couldn't hear her, and her back was to me. I slid out, and as I passed the dining-room I thought I'd make sure them watchers hadn't seen me; so I looked through the crack, and everything was all right. They hadn't stirred.

kneeled - de rodillas; arrodillarse

dining - cenar

watchers - vigilantes; vigilante

looked through - revisar, buscar entre; mirar sin ver, ignorar; mirar por

I slipped up to bed, feeling ruther blue, on accounts of the thing playing out that way after I had took so much trouble and run so much resk about it. Says I, if it could stay where it is, all right; because when we get down the river a hundred mile or two I could write back to Mary Jane, and she could dig him up again and get it; but that ain't the thing that's going to happen; the thing that's going to happen is, the money 'll be found when they come to screw on the lid. Then the king 'll get it again, and it 'll be a long day before he gives anybody another chance to smouch it from him.

write back - contestar, responder

dig - cavar

screw on - Atornillar

Of course I wanted to slide down and get it out of there, but I dasn't try it. Every minute it was getting earlier now, and pretty soon some of them watchers would begin to stir, and I might get catched"catched with six thousand dollars in my hands that nobody hadn't hired me to take care of. I don't wish to be mixed up in no such business as that, I says to myself.

When I got down stairs in the morning the parlor was shut up, and the watchers was gone. There warn't nobody around but the family and the widow Bartley and our tribe. I watched their faces to see if anything had been happening, but I couldn't tell.

Towards the middle of the day the undertaker come with his man, and they set the coffin in the middle of the room on a couple of chairs, and then set all our chairs in rows, and borrowed more from the neighbors till the hall and the parlor and the dining-room was full. I see the coffin lid was the way it was before, but I dasn't go to look in under it, with folks around.

coffin lid - Tapa de ataúd

Then the people begun to flock in, and the beats and the girls took seats in the front row at the head of the coffin, and for a half an hour the people filed around slow, in single rank, and looked down at the dead man's face a minute, and some dropped in a tear, and it was all very still and solemn, only the girls and the beats holding handkerchiefs to their eyes and keeping their heads bent, and sobbing a little.

flock - rebano, bandada

filed - archivado; fila

dropped in - pasar

handkerchiefs - panuelos; panuelo

There warn't no other sound but the scraping of the feet on the floor and blowing noses"because people always blows them more at a funeral than they do at other places except church.

scraping - Raspando; (scrap) Raspando

When the place was packed full the undertaker he slid around in his black gloves with his softy soothering ways, putting on the last touches, and getting people and things all ship-shape and comfortable, and making no more sound than a cat.

gloves - guantes; guante, gorro

softy - suave; sentimental

soothering - Calmante

He never spoke; he moved people around, he squeezed in late ones, he opened up passageways, and done it with nods, and signs with his hands. Then he took his place over against the wall. He was the softest, glidingest, stealthiest man I ever see; and there warn't no more smile to him than there is to a ham.

passageways - pasillos; pasillo

nods - asiente; asentir, cabecear, cabezada

glidingest - el más deslizante

stealthiest - el más sigiloso; sigiloso, furtivo

Ham - jamón

They had borrowed a melodeum"a sick one; and when everything was ready a young woman set down and worked it, and it was pretty skreeky and colicky, and everybody joined in and sung, and Peter was the only one that had a good thing, according to my notion. Then the Reverend Hobson opened up, slow and solemn, and begun to talk; and straight off the most outrageous row busted out in the cellar a body ever heard; it was only one dog, but he made a most powerful racket, and he kept it up right along; the parson he had to stand there, over the coffin, and wait"you couldn't hear yourself think. It was right down awkward, and nobody didn't seem to know what to do. But pretty soon they see that long-legged undertaker make a sign to the preacher as much as to say, "Don't you worry"just depend on me.

colicky - con cólicos

Then he stooped down and begun to glide along the wall, just his shoulders showing over the people's heads. So he glided along, and the powwow and racket getting more and more outrageous all the time; and at last, when he had gone around two sides of the room, he disappears down cellar. Then in about two seconds we heard a whack, and the dog he finished up with a most amazing howl or two, and then everything was dead still, and the parson begun his solemn talk where he left off. In a minute or two here comes this undertaker's back and shoulders gliding along the wall again; and so he glided and glided around three sides of the room, and then rose up, and shaded his mouth with his hands, and stretched his neck out towards the preacher, over the people's heads, and says, in a kind of a coarse whisper, "He had a rat!" Then he drooped down and glided along the wall again to his place. You could see it was a great satisfaction to the people, because naturally they wanted to know. A little thing like that don't cost nothing, and it's just the little things that makes a man to be looked up to and liked. There warn't no more popular man in town than what that undertaker was.

glided - se deslizó; deslizar, planear

shaded - sombreado; alosa, sábalo

satisfaction - satisfacción, satisfacción

Well, the funeral sermon was very good, but pison long and tiresome; and then the king he shoved in and got off some of his usual rubbage, and at last the job was through, and the undertaker begun to sneak up on the coffin with his screw-driver. I was in a sweat then, and watched him pretty keen. But he never meddled at all; just slid the lid along as soft as mush, and screwed it down tight and fast. So there I was! I didn't know whether the money was in there or not.

pison - Pisón

sneak - escapar; pillo, moverse con sigilo, esconder, escabullir

keen - con ganas; entusiasta

meddled - se entrometió; entrometerse, inmiscuirse, injerirse, mangonear

screwed - jodido; tornillo, tirafondo, hélice, atornillar, enroscar

So, says I, s'pose somebody has hogged that bag on the sly?"now how do I know whether to write to Mary Jane or not? S'pose she dug him up and didn't find nothing, what would she think of me? Blame it, I says, I might get hunted up and jailed; I'd better lay low and keep dark, and not write at all; the thing's awful mixed now; trying to better it, I've worsened it a hundred times, and I wish to goodness I'd just let it alone, dad fetch the whole business!

hogged - acaparado; cerdo, puerco, marrano

worsened - mpeorado; empeorar, desmejorar, ir de mal en peor, empeorarse

They buried him, and we come back home, and I went to watching faces again"I couldn't help it, and I couldn't rest easy. But nothing come of it; the faces didn't tell me nothing.

The king he visited around in the evening, and sweetened everybody up, and made himself ever so friendly; and he give out the idea that his congregation over in England would be in a sweat about him, so he must hurry and settle up the estate right away and leave for home. He was very sorry he was so pushed, and so was everybody; they wished he could stay longer, but they said they could see it couldn't be done.

sweetened - azucarado; azucarar, edulcorar, endulzar

congregation - congregación

And he said of course him and William would take the girls home with them; and that pleased everybody too, because then the girls would be well fixed and amongst their own relations; and it pleased the girls, too"tickled them so they clean forgot they ever had a trouble in the world; and told him to sell out as quick as he wanted to, they would be ready. Them poor things was that glad and happy it made my heart ache to see them getting fooled and lied to so, but I didn't see no safe way for me to chip in and change the general tune.

tickled - cosquilla, hacer cosquillas, cosquillear

ache - dolor

tune - melodía, tonada, afinar, sintonizar

Well, blamed if the king didn't bill the house and the niggers and all the property for auction straight off"sale two days after the funeral; but anybody could buy private beforehand if they wanted to.

beforehand - de antemano, anticipadamente, adelantadamente, antes

So the next day after the funeral, along about noon-time, the girls'joy got the first jolt. A couple of nigger traders come along, and the king sold them the niggers reasonable, for three-day drafts as they called it, and away they went, the two sons up the river to Memphis, and their mother down the river to Orleans. I thought them poor girls and them niggers would break their hearts for grief; they cried around each other, and took on so it most made me down sick to see it.

traders - comerciantes; comerciante

drafts - orradores; corriente, corriente de aire, trago

Memphis - Menfis

grief - duelo; pesar, pesadumbre, dolor, sufrimiento

The girls said they hadn't ever dreamed of seeing the family separated or sold away from the town. I can't ever get it out of my memory, the sight of them poor miserable girls and niggers hanging around each other's necks and crying; and I reckon I couldn't a stood it all, but would a had to bust out and tell on our gang if I hadn't knowed the sale warn't no account and the niggers would be back home in a week or two.

The thing made a big stir in the town, too, and a good many come out flatfooted and said it was scandalous to separate the mother and the children that way. It injured the frauds some; but the old fool he bulled right along, spite of all the duke could say or do, and I tell you the duke was powerful uneasy.

scandalous - escandaloso

injured - lastimado; herir, lastimar

bulled - bulled; toro

Next day was auction day. About broad day in the morning the king and the duke come up in the garret and woke me up, and I see by their look that there was trouble. The king says:

"Was you in my room night before last?"

"No, your majesty""which was the way I always called him when nobody but our gang warn't around.

"Was you in there yisterday er last night?"

"No, your majesty."

"Honor bright, now"no lies."

honor - honor, privilegio, honrar, ajustarse, acatar, respetar

"Honor bright, your majesty, I'm telling you the truth. I hain't been a-near your room since Miss Mary Jane took you and the duke and showed it to you."

The duke says:

"Have you seen anybody else go in there?"

"No, your grace, not as I remember, I believe."

"Stop and think."

I studied awhile and see my chance; then I says:

"Well, I see the niggers go in there several times."

Both of them gave a little jump, and looked like they hadn't ever expected it, and then like they had. Then the duke says:

"What, all of them?"

"No"leastways, not all at once"that is, I don't think I ever see them all come out at once but just one time."

"Hello! When was that?"

"It was the day we had the funeral. In the morning. It warn't early, because I overslept. I was just starting down the ladder, and I see them."

overslept - te quedaste dormido; quedarse dormido

"Well, go on, go on! What did they do? How'd they act?"

"They didn't do nothing. And they didn't act anyway much, as fur as I see. They tiptoed away; so I seen, easy enough, that they'd shoved in there to do up your majesty's room, or something, s'posing you was up; and found you warn't up, and so they was hoping to slide out of the way of trouble without waking you up, if they hadn't already waked you up."

do up - abrochar, renovar, decorar, envolver

posing - Posando; (pos) Posando

"Great guns, this is a go!" says the king; and both of them looked pretty sick and tolerable silly. They stood there a-thinking and scratching their heads a minute, and the duke he bust into a kind of a little raspy chuckle, and says:

silly - bobo, tonto, ninito, infantil, apayasado, semiaturdido, tontito

scratching - Rascarse; (scratch); rascar, raspar, aranar, rasgunar, rayar

"It does beat all how neat the niggers played their hand. They let on to be sorry they was going out of this region! And I believed they was sorry, and so did you, and so did everybody. Don't ever tell me any more that a nigger ain't got any histrionic talent. Why, the way they played that thing it would fool anybody. In my opinion, there's a fortune in 'em.

neat - bien; pulcro, ordenado

talent - talento, talentosos, talentoso

If I had capital and a theater, I wouldn't want a better lay-out than that"and here we've gone and sold 'em for a song. Yes, and ain't privileged to sing the song yet. Say, where is that song"that draft?"

privileged - privilegiado; privilegio, privilegiar

draft - corriente, corriente de aire, trago, cerveza de barril, calado

"In the bank for to be collected. Where would it be?"

"Well, that's all right then, thank goodness."

Says I, kind of timid-like:

timid - tímido

"Is something gone wrong?"

The king whirls on me and rips out:

"None o'your business! You keep your head shet, and mind y'r own affairs"if you got any. Long as you're in this town don't you forgit that"you hear?" Then he says to the duke, "We got to jest swaller it and say noth'n': mum's the word for us."

affairs - asuntos; negocio, asunto, rollo, amorío, aventura

swaller - Golondrina

As they was starting down the ladder the duke he chuckles again, and says:

chuckles - risas; reírse (entre dientes)

"Quick sales and small profits! It's a good business"yes."

profits - ganancias; ganancia, beneficio, explotar, beneficiarse

v

The king snarls around on him and says:

snarls - grunidos; grunir

"I was trying to do for the best in sellin''em out so quick. If the profits has turned out to be none, lackin'considable, and none to carry, is it my fault any more'n it's yourn?"

"Well, they'd be in this house yet and we wouldn't if I could a got my advice listened to."

The king sassed back as much as was safe for him, and then swapped around and lit into me again.

He give me down the banks for not coming and telling him I see the niggers come out of his room acting that way"said any fool would a knowed something was up. And then waltzed in and cussed himself awhile, and said it all come of him not laying late and taking his natural rest that morning, and he'd be blamed if he'd ever do it again. So they went off a-jawing; and I felt dreadful glad I'd worked it all off on to the niggers, and yet hadn't done the niggers no harm by it.

CHAPTER XXVIII.

By-and-by it was getting-up time. So I come down the ladder and started for down-stairs; but as I come to the girls'room the door was open, and I see Mary Jane setting by her old hair trunk, which was open and she'd been packing things in it"getting ready to go to England.

But she had stopped now with a folded gown in her lap, and had her face in her hands, crying. I felt awful bad to see it; of course anybody would. I went in there and says:

"Miss Mary Jane, you can't a-bear to see people in trouble, and I can't"most always. Tell me about it."

So she done it. And it was the niggers"I just expected it. She said the beautiful trip to England was most about spoiled for her; she didn't know how she was ever going to be happy there, knowing the mother and the children warn't ever going to see each other no more"and then busted out bitterer than ever, and flung up her hands, and says:

bitterer - más amargo; amargo

"Oh, dear, dear, to think they ain't ever going to see each other any more!"

"But they will"and inside of two weeks"and I know it!" says I.

Laws, it was out before I could think! And before I could budge she throws her arms around my neck and told me to say it again, say it again, say it again!

I see I had spoke too sudden and said too much, and was in a close place. I asked her to let me think a minute; and she set there, very impatient and excited and handsome, but looking kind of happy and eased-up, like a person that's had a tooth pulled out. So I went to studying it out. I says to myself, I reckon a body that ups and tells the truth when he is in a tight place is taking considerable many resks, though I ain't had no experience, and can't say for certain; but it looks so to me, anyway; and yet here's a case where I'm blest if it don't look to me like the truth is better and actuly safer than a lie. I must lay it by in my mind, and think it over some time or other, it's so kind of strange and unregular. I never see nothing like it.

impatient - impaciente

eased-up - (eased-up) se ha relajado

actuly - de verdad

unregular - irregular

Well, I says to myself at last, I'm a-going to chance it; I'll up and tell the truth this time, though it does seem most like setting down on a kag of powder and touching it off just to see where you'll go to. Then I says:

powder - polvo, reducir a polvo, pulverizar, triturar, espolvorear

"Miss Mary Jane, is there any place out of town a little ways where you could go and stay three or four days?"

"Yes; Mr. Lothrop's. Why?"

"Never mind why yet. If I'll tell you how I know the niggers will see each other again inside of two weeks"here in this house"and prove how I know it"will you go to Mr. Lothrop's and stay four days?"

"Four days!" she says; "I'll stay a year!"

"All right," I says, "I don't want nothing more out of you than just your word"I druther have it than another man's kiss-the-Bible." She smiled and reddened up very sweet, and I says, "If you don't mind it, I'll shut the door"and bolt it."

reddened - enrojecido; enrojecer

bolt - perno; pestillo

Then I come back and set down again, and says:

"Don't you holler. Just set still and take it like a man. I got to tell the truth, and you want to brace up, Miss Mary, because it's a bad kind, and going to be hard to take, but there ain't no help for it. These uncles of yourn ain't no uncles at all; they're a couple of frauds"regular dead-beats. There, now we're over the worst of it, you can stand the rest middling easy."

brace - brazo; braza, abrazadera, tensor, tirante, pareja, tirantes

"The brute! Come, don't waste a minute"not a second"we'll have them tarred and feathered, and flung in the river!"

brute - bruto; animal, bestia

tarred - arre

feathered - plumas; pluma

Says I:

"Cert'nly. But do you mean before you go to Mr. Lothrop's, or""

"Oh," she says, "what am I thinking about!" she says, and set right down again. "Don't mind what I said"please don't"you won't, now, will you?" Laying her silky hand on mine in that kind of a way that I said I would die first. "I never thought, I was so stirred up," she says; "now go on, and I won't do so any more. You tell me what to do, and whatever you say I'll do it."

set right - arreglar, corregir

I'll do it - Lo haré

"Well," I says, "it's a rough gang, them two frauds, and I'm fixed so I got to travel with them a while longer, whether I want to or not"I druther not tell you why; and if you was to blow on them this town would get me out of their claws, and I'd be all right; but there'd be another person that you don't know about who'd be in big trouble. Well, we got to save him, hain't we? Of course. Well, then, we won't blow on them."

travel with - viajar con

claws - garras; garra

Saying them words put a good idea in my head. I see how maybe I could get me and Jim rid of the frauds; get them jailed here, and then leave. But I didn't want to run the raft in the daytime without anybody aboard to answer questions but me; so I didn't want the plan to begin working till pretty late to-night. I says:

"Miss Mary Jane, I'll tell you what we'll do, and you won't have to stay at Mr. Lothrop's so long, nuther. How fur is it?"

"A little short of four miles"right out in the country, back here."

"Well, that 'll answer. Now you go along out there, and lay low till nine or half-past to-night, and then get them to fetch you home again"tell them you've thought of something. If you get here before eleven put a candle in this window, and if I don't turn up wait till eleven, and then if I don't turn up it means I'm gone, and out of the way, and safe. Then you come out and spread the news around, and get these beats jailed."

"Good," she says, "I'll do it."

"And if it just happens so that I don't get away, but get took up along with them, you must up and say I told you the whole thing beforehand, and you must stand by me all you can."

"Stand by you! indeed I will. They sha'n't touch a hair of your head!" she says, and I see her nostrils spread and her eyes snap when she said it, too.

indeed - de verdad; de hecho, realmente, efectivamente, verdaderamente

"If I get away I sha'n't be here," I says, "to prove these rapscallions ain't your uncles, and I couldn't do it if I was here. I could swear they was beats and bummers, that's all, though that's worth something. Well, there's others can do that better than what I can, and they're people that ain't going to be doubted as quick as I'd be. I'll tell you how to find them. Gimme a pencil and a piece of paper.

bummers - Mal rollo

doubted - dudaba; dudar, duda, incertidumbre

There"˜Royal Nonesuch, Bricksville.'Put it away, and don't lose it. When the court wants to find out something about these two, let them send up to Bricksville and say they've got the men that played the Royal Nonesuch, and ask for some witnesses"why, you'll have that entire town down here before you can hardly wink, Miss Mary. And they'll come a-biling, too."

send up - parodiar, ridiculizar

witnesses - testigos; testimonio, testigo, prueba, testificar, probar

entire - entero

I judged we had got everything fixed about right now. So I says:

"Just let the auction go right along, and Don't worry. Nobody don't have to pay for the things they buy till a whole day after the auction on accounts of the short notice, and they ain't going out of this till they get that money; and the way we've fixed it the sale ain't going to count, and they ain't going to get no money.

Don't worry - No te preocupes

It's just like the way it was with the niggers"it warn't no sale, and the niggers will be back before long. Why, they can't collect the money for the niggers yet"they're in the worst kind of a fix, Miss Mary."

"Well," she says, "I'll run down to breakfast now, and then I'll start straight for Mr. Lothrop's."

"'Deed, that ain't the ticket, Miss Mary Jane," I says, "by no manner of means; go before breakfast."

"Why?"

"What did you reckon I wanted you to go at all for, Miss Mary?"

"Well, I never thought"and come to think, I don't know. What was it?"

"Why, it's because you ain't one of these leather-face people. I don't want no better book than what your face is. A body can set down and Read it off like coarse print. Do you reckon you can go and face your uncles when they come to kiss you good-morning, and never""

Read it off - leer en voz alta

"There, there, don't! Yes, I'll go before breakfast"I'll be glad to. And leave my sisters with them?"

"Yes; never mind about them. They've got to stand it yet a while. They might suspicion something if all of you was to go. I don't want you to see them, nor your sisters, nor nobody in this town; if a neighbor was to ask how is your uncles this morning your face would tell something. No, you go right along, Miss Mary Jane, and I'll fix it with all of them. I'll tell Miss Susan to give your love to your uncles and say you've went away for a few hours for to get a little rest and change, or to see a friend, and you'll be back to-night or early in the morning.

neighbor - vecino

"Gone to see a friend is all right, but I won't have my love given to them."

"Well, then, it sha'n't be." It was well enough to tell her so"no harm in it. It was only a little thing to do, and no trouble; and it's the little things that smooths people's roads the most, down here below; it would make Mary Jane comfortable, and it wouldn't cost nothing. Then I says: "There's one more thing"that bag of money."

smooths - suaves; liso, sofisticado, constante, tranquilo, apacible

"Well, they've got that; and it makes me feel pretty silly to think how they got it."

"No, you're out, there. They hain't got it."

"Why, who's got it?"

"I wish I knowed, but I don't. I had it, because I stole it from them; and I stole it to give to you; and I know where I hid it, but I'm afraid it ain't there no more. I'm awful sorry, Miss Mary Jane, I'm just as sorry as I can be; but I done the best I could; I did honest. I come nigh getting caught, and I had to shove it into the first place I come to, and run"and it warn't a good place."

I'm afraid - Tengo miedo

getting caught - pillar a alguien; atraparse

"Oh, stop blaming yourself"it's too bad to do it, and I won't allow it"you couldn't help it; it wasn't your fault. Where did you hide it?"

I didn't want to set her to thinking about her troubles again; and I couldn't seem to get my mouth to tell her what would make her see that corpse laying in the coffin with that bag of money on his stomach. So for a minute I didn't say nothing; then I says:

"I'd ruther not tell you where I put it, Miss Mary Jane, if you don't mind letting me off; but I'll write it for you on a piece of paper, and you can read it along the road to Mr. Lothrop's, if you want to. Do you reckon that 'll do?"

"Oh, yes."

So I wrote: "I put it in the coffin. It was in there when you was crying there, away in the night. I was behind the door, and I was mighty sorry for you, Miss Mary Jane."

It made my eyes water a little to remember her crying there all by herself in the night, and them devils laying there right under her own roof, shaming her and robbing her; and when I folded it up and give it to her I see the water come into her eyes, too; and she shook me by the hand, hard, and says:

shaming - vergüenza, pena

robbing - robando; robar

"Good-bye. I'm going to do everything just as you've told me; and if I don't ever see you again, I sha'n't ever forget you and I'll think of you a many and a many a time, and I'll pray for you, too!""and she was gone.

Pray for me! I reckoned if she knowed me she'd take a job that was more nearer her size. But I bet she done it, just the same"she was just that kind. She had the grit to pray for Judus if she took the notion"there warn't no back-down to her, I judge. You may say what you want to, but in my opinion she had more sand in her than any girl I ever see; in my opinion she was just full of sand. It sounds like flattery, but it ain't no flattery.

flattery - halagos; adulación, peloteo, piropo, camelo, lisonja

And when it comes to beauty"and goodness, too"she lays over them all. I hain't ever seen her since that time that I see her go out of that door; no, I hain't ever seen her since, but I reckon I've thought of her a many and a many a million times, and of her saying she would pray for me; and if ever I'd a thought it would do any good for me to pray for her, blamed if I wouldn't a done it or bust.

Well, Mary Jane she lit out the back way, I reckon; because nobody see her go. When I struck Susan and the hare-lip, I says:

"What's the name of them people over on t'other side of the river that you all goes to see sometimes?"

They says:

"There's several; but it's the Proctors, mainly."

"That's the name," I says; "I most forgot it. Well, Miss Mary Jane she told me to tell you she's gone over there in a dreadful hurry"one of them's sick."

"Which one?"

"I don't know; leastways, I kinder forget; but I thinks it's""

"Sakes alive, I hope it ain't Hanner?"

"I'm sorry to say it," I says, "but Hanner's the very one."

I'm sorry to say - Siento decirlo

"My goodness, and she so well only last week! Is she took bad?"

"It ain't no name for it. They set up with her all night, Miss Mary Jane said, and they don't think she'll last many hours."

"Only think of that, now! What's the matter with her?"

I couldn't think of anything reasonable, right off that way, so I says:

"Mumps."

"Mumps your granny! They don't set up with people that's got the mumps."

"They don't, don't they? You better bet they do with these mumps. These mumps is different. It's a new kind, Miss Mary Jane said."

"How's it a new kind?"

"Because it's mixed up with other things."

"What other things?"

"Well, measles, and whooping-cough, and erysiplas, and consumption, and yaller janders, and brain-fever, and I don't know what all."

consumption - consumo

"My land! And they call it the mumps?"

"That's what Miss Mary Jane said."

"Well, what in the nation do they call it the mumps for?"

"Why, because it is the mumps. That's what it starts with."

"Well, ther'ain't no sense in it. A body might stump his toe, and take pison, and fall down the well, and break his neck, and bust his brains out, and somebody come along and ask what killed him, and some numskull up and say, ˜Why, he stumped his toe.'Would ther'be any sense in that? No. And ther'ain't no sense in this, nuther. Is it ketching?"

toe - dedo del pie, ortejo

numskull - inútil; hueca cabeza, cabeza hueca

"Is it ketching? Why, how you talk. Is a harrow catching"in the dark? If you don't hitch on to one tooth, you're bound to on another, ain't you? And you can't get away with that tooth without fetching the whole harrow along, can you? Well, these kind of mumps is a kind of a harrow, as you may say"and it ain't no slouch of a harrow, nuther, you come to get it hitched on good."

"Well, it's awful, I think," says the hare-lip. "I'll go to Uncle Harvey and""

"Oh, yes," I says, "I would. Of course I would. I wouldn't lose no time."

"Well, why wouldn't you?"

"Just look at it a minute, and maybe you can see. Hain't your uncles obleegd to get along home to England as fast as they can? And do you reckon they'd be mean enough to go off and leave you to go all that journey by yourselves? You know they'll wait for you. So fur, so good. Your uncle Harvey's a preacher, ain't he? Very well, then; is a preacher going to deceive a steamboat clerk? is he going to deceive a ship clerk?"so as to get them to let Miss Mary Jane go aboard? Now you know he ain't.

be mean - ser mezquino

deceive - enganar; enganar, decebir

clerk - clérigo, oficinista, secretario, escribiente

What will he do, then? Why, he'll say, ˜It's a great pity, but my church matters has got to get along the best way they can; for my niece has been exposed to the dreadful pluribus-unum mumps, and so it's my bounden duty to set down here and wait the three months it takes to show on her if she's got it.'But never mind, if you think it's best to tell your uncle Harvey""

pity - compasión, piedad, lástima, pena, tener lástima

exposed - Exposiciones

"Shucks, and stay fooling around here when we could all be having good times in England whilst we was waiting to find out whether Mary Jane's got it or not? Why, you talk like a muggins."

"Well, anyway, maybe you'd better tell some of the neighbors."

"Listen at that, now. You do beat all for natural stupidness. Can't you see that they'd go and tell? Ther'ain't no way but just to not tell anybody at all."

stupidness - Estupidez

"Well, maybe You're right"yes, I judge you are right."

You're right - Tienes razón

"But I reckon we ought to tell Uncle Harvey she's gone out a while, anyway, so he won't be uneasy about her?"

"Yes, Miss Mary Jane she wanted you to do that. She says, ˜Tell them to give Uncle Harvey and William my love and a kiss, and say I've run over the river to see Mr.'"Mr."what is the name of that rich family your uncle Peter used to think so much of?"I mean the one that""

"Why, you must mean the Apthorps, ain't it?"

"Of course; bother them kind of names, a body can't ever seem to remember them, half the time, somehow. Yes, she said, say she has run over for to ask the Apthorps to be sure and come to the auction and buy this house, because she allowed her uncle Peter would ruther they had it than anybody else; and she's going to stick to them till they say they'll come, and then, if she ain't too tired, she's coming home; and if she is, she'll be home in the morning anyway.

She said, don't say nothing about the Proctors, but only about the Apthorps"which 'll be perfectly true, because she is going there to speak about their buying the house; I know it, because she told me so herself."

"All right," they said, and cleared out to lay for their uncles, and give them the love and the kisses, and tell them the message.

kisses - besos; besar

Everything was all right now. The girls wouldn't say nothing because they wanted to go to England; and the king and the duke would ruther Mary Jane was off working for the auction than around in reach of Doctor Robinson.

I felt very good; I judged I had done it pretty neat"I reckoned Tom Sawyer couldn't a done it no neater himself. Of course he would a throwed more style into it, but I can't do that very handy, not being brung up to it.

neater - más ordenado; pulcro, ordenado

Well, they held the auction in the public square, along towards the end of the afternoon, and it strung along, and strung along, and the old man he was on hand and looking his level pisonest, up there longside of the auctioneer, and chipping in a little Scripture now and then, or a little goody-goody saying of some kind, and the duke he was around goo-gooing for sympathy all he knowed how, and just spreading himself generly.

strung - encordado; cordel, mecate, usic, cadena, cuerda, enhebrar

longside - al lado

auctioneer - pregonero, subastador, rematador, rematar, subastar

goody - Bueno

But by-and-by the thing dragged through, and everything was sold"everything but a little old trifling lot in the graveyard. So they'd got to work that off"I never see such a girafft as the king was for wanting to swallow everything. Well, whilst they was at it a steamboat landed, and in about two minutes up comes a crowd a-whooping and yelling and laughing and carrying on, and singing out:

trifling - tan insignificante; trivial, de pitiminí

girafft - Jirafa

"Here's your opposition line! here's your two sets o'heirs to old Peter Wilks"and you pays your money and you takes your choice!"

opposition - oposición

CHAPTER XXIX.

They was fetching a very nice-looking old gentleman along, and a nice-looking younger one, with his right arm in a sling. And, my souls, how the people yelled and laughed, and kept it up. But I didn't see no joke about it, and I judged it would strain the duke and the king some to see any. I reckoned they'd turn pale. But no, nary a pale did they turn. The duke he never let on he suspicioned what was up, but just went a goo-gooing around, happy and satisfied, like a jug that's googling out buttermilk; and as for the king, he just gazed and gazed down sorrowful on them new-comers like it give him the stomach-ache in his very heart to think there could be such frauds and rascals in the world. Oh, he done it admirable. Lots of the principal people gethered around the king, to let him see they was on his side. That old gentleman that had just come looked all puzzled to death.

strain - tensión; estirar, tensar

turn pale - ponerse pálido

nary - ario; ninguno

googling - Buscando en Google; (google); Google

gazed - mirada; observar, mirar fijamente

sorrowful - triste

stomach-ache - (stomach-ache) dolor de estómago

admirable - admirable, loable

Pretty soon he begun to speak, and I see straight off he pronounced like an Englishman"not the king's way, though the king's was pretty good for an imitation. I can't give the old gent's words, nor I can't imitate him; but he turned around to the crowd, and says, about like this:

"This is a surprise to me which I wasn't looking for; and I'll acknowledge, candid and frank, I ain't very well fixed to meet it and answer it; for my brother and me has had misfortunes; he's broke his arm, and our baggage got put off at a town above here last night in the night by a mistake. I am Peter Wilks'brother Harvey, and this is his brother William, which can't hear nor speak"and can't even make signs to amount to much, now't he's only got one hand to work them with.

candid - cándido; franco

frank - franco

misfortunes - desgracias; infortunio, gafe, mala suerte, desgracia

We are who we say we are; and in a day or two, when I get the baggage, I can prove it. But up till then I won't say nothing more, but go to the hotel and wait."

till then - hasta entonces

So him and the new dummy started off; and the king he laughs, and blethers out:

dummy - silencioso, tonto, maniquí, muerto

"Broke his arm"very likely, ain't it?"and very convenient, too, for a fraud that's got to make signs, and ain't learnt how. Lost their baggage! That's mighty good!"and mighty ingenious"under the circumstances!"

Convenient - conveniente, cómodo

ingenious - ingenioso

circumstances - circunstancias; circunstancia

So he laughed again; and so did everybody else, except three or four, or maybe half a dozen. One of these was that doctor; another one was a sharp-looking gentleman, with a carpet-bag of the old-fashioned kind made out of carpet-stuff, that had just come off of the steamboat and was talking to him in a low voice, and glancing towards the king now and then and nodding their heads"it was Levi Bell, the lawyer that was gone up to Louisville; and another one was a big rough husky that come along and listened to all the old gentleman said, and was listening to the king now.

glancing - echando un vistazo; (glance); ojear, echar un vistazo, mirar

nodding - Asintiendo; (nod); asentir, cabecear, cabezada

husky - ronco

And when the king got done this husky up and says:

"Say, looky here; if you are Harvey Wilks, when'd you come to this town?"

"The day before the funeral, friend," says the king.

"But what time o'day?"

"In the evenin'"'bout an hour er two before sundown."

"How'd you come?"

"I come down on the Susan Powell from Cincinnati."

"Well, then, how'd you come to be up at the Pint in the mornin'"in a canoe?"

"I warn't up at the Pint in the mornin'."

"It's a lie."

Several of them jumped for him and begged him not to talk that way to an old man and a preacher.

"Preacher be hanged, he's a fraud and a liar. He was up at the Pint that mornin'. I live up there, don't I? Well, I was up there, and he was up there. I see him there. He come in a canoe, along with Tim Collins and a boy."

hanged - Colgado

The doctor he up and says:

"Would you know the boy again if you was to see him, Hines?"

"I reckon I would, but I don't know. Why, yonder he is, now. I know him perfectly easy."

It was me he pointed at. The doctor says:

"Neighbors, I don't know whether the new couple is frauds or not; but if these two ain't frauds, I am an idiot, that's all. I think it's our duty to see that they don't get away from here till we've looked into this thing. Come along, Hines; come along, the rest of you. We'll take these fellows to the tavern and affront them with t'other couple, and I reckon we'll find out something before we get through."

affront - afrentar, ofender, afrontar, confrontar, afrenta, afruenta

It was nuts for the crowd, though maybe not for the king's friends; so we all started. It was about sundown. The doctor he led me along by the hand, and was plenty kind enough, but he never let go my hand.

led - llevado; led; (lead) llevado; led

We all got in a big room in the hotel, and lit up some candles, and fetched in the new couple. First, the doctor says:

"I don't wish to be too hard on these two men, but I think they're frauds, and they may have complices that we don't know nothing about. If they have, won't the complices get away with that bag of gold Peter Wilks left? It ain't unlikely. If these men ain't frauds, they won't object to sending for that money and letting us keep it till they prove they're all right"ain't that so?"

unlikely - poco probable; improbable, improbablemente

sending for - ir a buscar a, mandar a buscar an hacer traer

Everybody agreed to that. So I judged they had our gang in a pretty tight place right at the outstart. But the king he only looked sorrowful, and says:

outstart - Empezar

"Gentlemen, I wish the money was there, for I ain't got no disposition to throw anything in the way of a fair, open, out-and-out investigation o'this misable business; but, alas, the money ain't there; you k'n send and see, if you want to."

investigation - investigación

"Where is it, then?"

"Well, when my niece give it to me to keep for her I took and hid it inside o'the straw tick o'my bed, not wishin'to bank it for the few days we'd be here, and considerin'the bed a safe place, we not bein'used to niggers, and suppos'n''em honest, like servants in England.

wishin - Deseando

considerin - considerando

suppos - supone

The niggers stole it the very next mornin'after I had went down stairs; and when I sold 'em I hadn't missed the money yit, so they got clean away with it. My servant here k'n tell you 'bout it, gentlemen."

The doctor and several said "Shucks!" and I see nobody didn't altogether believe him. One man asked me if I see the niggers steal it. I said no, but I see them sneaking out of the room and hustling away, and I never thought nothing, only I reckoned they was afraid they had waked up my master and was trying to get away before he made trouble with them. That was all they asked me. Then the doctor whirls on me and says:

hustling - Apurado; (hustle); darse prisa, apurarse, enganar, engrupir

Master - maestro; senor, dueno; senora, duena

"Are you English, too?"

I says yes; and him and some others laughed, and said, "Stuff!"

Well, then they sailed in on the general investigation, and there we had it, up and down, hour in, hour out, and nobody never said a word about supper, nor ever seemed to think about it"and so they kept it up, and kept it up; and it was the worst mixed-up thing you ever see. They made the king tell his yarn, and they made the old gentleman tell his'n; and anybody but a lot of prejudiced chuckleheads would a seen that the old gentleman was spinning truth and t'other one lies.

prejudiced - con prejuicios; prejuicio, perjudicar, prejuiciar

And by-and-by they had me up to tell what I knowed. The king he give me a left-handed look out of the corner of his eye, and so I knowed enough to talk on the right side. I begun to tell about Sheffield, and how we lived there, and all about the English Wilkses, and so on; but I didn't get pretty fur till the doctor begun to laugh; and Levi Bell, the lawyer, says:

"Set down, my boy; I wouldn't strain myself if I was you. I reckon you ain't used to lying, it don't seem to come handy; what you want is practice. You do it pretty awkward."

I didn't care nothing for the compliment, but I was glad to be let off, anyway.

compliment - cumplido, felicitar, cumplimentar

The doctor he started to say something, and turns and says:

"If you'd been in town at first, Levi Bell"" The king broke in and reached out his hand, and says:

"Why, is this my poor dead brother's old friend that he's wrote so often about?"

The lawyer and him shook hands, and the lawyer smiled and looked pleased, and they talked right along awhile, and then got to one side and talked low; and at last the lawyer speaks up and says:

"That 'll fix it. I'll take the order and send it, along with your brother's, and then they'll know it's all right."

So they got some paper and a pen, and the king he set down and twisted his head to one side, and chawed his tongue, and scrawled off something; and then they give the pen to the duke"and then for the first time the duke looked sick. But he took the pen and wrote. So then the lawyer turns to the new old gentleman and says:

scrawled - arabateado; garabatear

"You and your brother please write a line or two and sign your names."

The old gentleman wrote, but nobody couldn't read it. The lawyer looked powerful astonished, and says:

The new old gentleman says:

"If you please, let me explain. Nobody can read my hand but my brother there"so he copies for me. It's his hand you've got there, not mine."

"Well!" says the lawyer, "this is a state of things. I've got some of William's letters, too; so if you'll get him to write a line or so we can com""

"He can't write with his left hand," says the old gentleman. "If he could use his right hand, you would see that he wrote his own letters and mine too. Look at both, please"they're by the same hand."

The lawyer done it, and says:

"I believe it's so"and if it ain't so, there's a heap stronger resemblance than I'd noticed before, anyway. Well, well, well! I thought we was right on the track of a solution, but it's gone to grass, partly. But anyway, one thing is proved"these two ain't either of 'em Wilkses""and he wagged his head towards the king and the duke.

resemblance - semejanza, similitud, similaridad, parecido

proved - probado; probar

wagged - meneado; menear, panish: t-needed

Well, what do you think? That muleheaded old fool wouldn't give in then! Indeed he wouldn't. Said it warn't no fair test. Said his brother William was the cussedest joker in the world, and hadn't tried to write"he see William was going to play one of his jokes the minute he put the pen to paper.

muleheaded - Cabeza de mula

cussedest - Más cussedest

joker - bromista, guasón, chistoso, humorista, comodín

And so he warmed up and went warbling and warbling right along till he was actuly beginning to believe what he was saying himself; but pretty soon the new gentleman broke in, and says:

"I've thought of something. Is there anybody here that helped to lay out my br"helped to lay out the late Peter Wilks for burying?"

burying - enterrar

"Yes," says somebody, "me and Ab Turner done it. We're both here."

Then the old man turns towards the king, and says:

"Perhaps this gentleman can tell me what was tattooed on his breast?"

tattooed - tatuado; tatuar

Blamed if the king didn't have to brace up mighty quick, or he'd a squshed down like a bluff bank that the river has cut under, it took him so sudden; and, mind you, it was a thing that was calculated to make most anybody sqush to get fetched such a solid one as that without any notice, because how was he going to know what was tattooed on the man? He whitened a little; he couldn't help it; and it was mighty still in there, and everybody bending a little forwards and gazing at him.

squshed - Aplastado

calculated - calculado; calcular

whitened - lanqueado; blanquear

gazing at - mirando

Says I to myself, Now he'll throw up the sponge"there ain't no more use. Well, did he? A body can't hardly believe it, but he didn't. I reckon he thought he'd keep the thing up till he tired them people out, so they'd thin out, and him and the duke could break loose and get away. Anyway, he set there, and pretty soon he begun to smile, and says:

sponge - esponja, cafiche, gorrón, cafichear, gorronear, gallofear

"Mf! It's a very tough question, ain't it! Yes, sir, I k'n tell you what's tattooed on his breast. It's jest a small, thin, blue arrow"that's what it is; and if you don't look clost, you can't see it. Now what do you say"hey?"

arrow - flecha

Well, I never see anything like that old blister for clean out-and-out cheek.

blister - una ampolla; ampolla, ámpula, ampollar

The new old gentleman turns brisk towards Ab Turner and his pard, and his eye lights up like he judged he'd got the king this time, and says:

lights up - Iluminar, encender

"There"you've heard what he said! Was there any such mark on Peter Wilks'breast?"

Both of them spoke up and says:

"We didn't see no such mark."

"Good!" says the old gentleman. "Now, what you did see on his breast was a small dim P, and a B (which is an initial he dropped when he was young), and a W, with dashes between them, so: P"B"W""and he marked them that way on a piece of paper. "Come, ain't that what you saw?"

initial - inicial, iniciales

dashes - guiones; raya, guion largo, carrerita, gota, pizca, lanzarse

Both of them spoke up again, and says:

"No, we didn't. We never seen any marks at all."

Well, everybody was in a state of mind now, and they sings out:

"The whole bilin'of 'm 's frauds! Le's duck 'em! le's drown 'em! le's ride 'em on a rail!" and everybody was whooping at once, and there was a rattling powwow. But the lawyer he jumps on the table and yells, and says:

drown - ahogarse

"Gentlemen"gentlemen! Hear me just a word"just a single word"if you PLEASE! There's one way yet"let's go and dig up the corpse and look."

let's go - Vamos, vámonos

dig up - Desenterrar; revelar, descubrir

That took them.

"Hooray!" they all shouted, and was starting right off; but the lawyer and the doctor sung out:

Hooray - !hurra!, !viva!

"Hold on, hold on! Collar all these four men and the boy, and fetch them along, too!"

"We'll do it!" they all shouted; "and if we don't find them marks we'll lynch the whole gang!"

I was scared, now, I tell you. But there warn't no getting away, you know. They gripped us all, and marched us right along, straight for the graveyard, which was a mile and a half down the river, and the whole town at our heels, for we made noise enough, and it was only nine in the evening.

gripped - agarrado; empunar, agarrar, aferrar, asir

made noise - hizo ruido

As we went by our house I wished I hadn't sent Mary Jane out of town; because now if I could tip her the wink she'd light out and save me, and blow on our dead-beats.

I couldn't bear to think about it; and yet, somehow, I couldn't think about nothing else. It got darker and darker, and it was a beautiful time to give the crowd the slip; but that big husky had me by the wrist"Hines"and a body might as well try to give Goliar the slip. He dragged me right along, he was so excited, and I had to run to keep up.

When they got there they swarmed into the graveyard and washed over it like an overflow. And when they got to the grave they found they had about a hundred times as many shovels as they wanted, but nobody hadn't thought to fetch a lantern. But they sailed into digging anyway by the flicker of the lightning, and sent a man to the nearest house, a half a mile off, to borrow one.

overflow - desbordamiento, aliviadero, escape, rebosar, colmar

shovels - palas; pala, traspalar, palear

At last they got out the coffin and begun to unscrew the lid, and then such another crowding and shouldering and shoving as there was, to scrouge in and get a sight, you never see; and in the dark, that way, it was awful. Hines he hurt my wrist dreadful pulling and tugging so, and I reckon he clean forgot I was in the world, he was so excited and panting.

unscrew - desatornillar, destornillar, desenroscar

scrouge - Gorrón

tugging - Tirones; (tug); tirar, halar

All of a sudden the lightning let go a perfect sluice of white glare, and somebody sings out:

sluice - esclusa, embalsar, lavar en agua corriente

"By the living jingo, here's the bag of gold on his breast!"

Hines let out a whoop, like everybody else, and dropped my wrist and give a big surge to bust his way in and get a look, and the way I lit out and shinned for the road in the dark there ain't nobody can tell.

surge - aluvión, oleada, sobretensión, sobrecarga, dispararse

shinned - lustrado; espinilla

I had the road all to myself, and I fairly flew"leastways, I had it all to myself except the solid dark, and the now-and-then glares, and the buzzing of the rain, and the thrashing of the wind, and the splitting of the thunder; and sure as you are born I did clip it along!

glares - resplandores; mirada fulminante

splitting - División; (split); fisura, escisión, partir, dividir, escindir

When I struck the town I see there warn't nobody out in the storm, so I never hunted for no back streets, but humped it straight through the main one; and when I begun to get towards our house I aimed my eye and set it. No light there; the house all dark"which made me feel sorry and disappointed, I didn't know why.

humped - jorobado; joroba, corcova, giba, cochar, montarse

But at last, just as I was sailing by, flash comes the light in Mary Jane's window! and my heart swelled up sudden, like to bust; and the same second the house and all was behind me in the dark, and wasn't ever going to be before me no more in this world. She was the best girl I ever see, and had the most sand.

The minute I was far enough above the town to see I could make the tow-head, I begun to look sharp for a boat to borrow, and the first time the lightning showed me one that wasn't chained I snatched it and shoved. It was a canoe, and warn't fastened with nothing but a rope. The tow-head was a rattling big distance off, away out there in the middle of the river, but I didn't lose no time; and when I struck the raft at last I was so fagged I would a just laid down to blow and gasp if I could afforded it.

chained - Cadena

snatched - arrebatado; agarrar, arrebatar, arrancada, arranque

fastened - sujetado; atar, abrochar

gasp - jadeo; jadear, bocanada, calada

afforded - se puede permitir; costear, permitirse

But I didn't. As I sprung aboard I sung out:

"Out with you, Jim, and set her loose! Glory be to goodness, we're shut of them!"

"Not now; have it for breakfast, have it for breakfast! Cut loose and let her slide!"

So I wilted right down on to the planks then, and give up; and it was all I could do to keep from crying.

wilted - se marchitó; marchitarse

CHAPTER XXX.

When they got aboard the king went for me, and shook me by the collar, and says:

"Tryin'to give us the slip, was ye, you pup! Tired of our company, hey?"

ye - sí; vos

I says:

"No, your majesty, we warn't"please don't, your majesty!"

"Quick, then, and tell us what was your idea, or I'll shake the insides out o'you!"

"Honest, I'll tell you everything just as it happened, your majesty. The man that had a-holt of me was very good to me, and kept saying he had a boy about as big as me that died last year, and he was sorry to see a boy in such a dangerous fix; and when they was all took by surprise by finding the gold, and made a rush for the coffin, he lets go of me and whispers, ˜Heel it now, or they'll hang ye, sure!'and I lit out. It didn't seem no good for me to stay"I couldn't do nothing, and I didn't want to be hung if I could get away.

whispers - susurros; susurro, rumor, rastro, susurrar

So I never stopped running till I found the canoe; and when I got here I told Jim to hurry, or they'd catch me and hang me yet, and said I was afeard you and the duke wasn't alive now, and I was awful sorry, and so was Jim, and was awful glad when we see you coming; you may ask Jim if I didn't."

Jim said it was so; and the king told him to shut up, and said, "Oh, yes, it's mighty likely!" and shook me up again, and said he reckoned he'd drownd me. But the duke says:

drownd - Ahogado

"Leggo the boy, you old idiot! Would you a done any different? Did you inquire around for him when you got loose? I don't remember it."

So the king let go of me, and begun to cuss that town and everybody in it. But the duke says:

"You better a blame'sight give yourself a good cussing, for you're the one that's entitled to it most. You hain't done a thing from the start that had any sense in it, except coming out so cool and cheeky with that imaginary blue-arrow mark. That was bright"it was right down bully; and it was the thing that saved us. For if it hadn't been for that they'd a jailed us till them Englishmen's baggage come"and then"the penitentiary, you bet!

cheeky - burlón, pillastre, descarado, pícaro

imaginary - imaginario

penitentiary - cárcel; penitenciaría

But that trick took 'em to the graveyard, and the gold done us a still bigger kindness; for if the excited fools hadn't let go all holts and made that rush to get a look we'd a slept in our cravats to-night"cravats warranted to wear, too"longer than we'd need 'em."

trick - truco, artimana, enganifa, treta

cravats - corbatas; mascada

warranted - está justificado; garantía, cédula, orden, garantizar

They was still a minute"thinking; then the king says, kind of absent-minded like:

absent - ausente

"Mf! And we reckoned the niggers stole it!"

That made me squirm!

squirm - serpentear, retorcerse, avergonzarse, escabullirse

"Yes," says the duke, kinder slow and deliberate and sarcastic, "We did."

After about a half a minute the king drawls out:

"Leastways, I did."

The duke says, the same way:

"On the contrary, I did."

contrary - contrario

The king kind of ruffles up, and says:

ruffles up - erizar; alterar la paz, aturdir

"Looky here, Bilgewater, what'r you referrin'to?"

The duke says, pretty brisk:

"When it comes to that, maybe you'll let me ask, what was you referring to?"

"Shucks!" says the king, very sarcastic; "but I don't know"maybe you was asleep, and didn't know what you was about."

The duke bristles up now, and says:

bristles - cerdas; cerda, erizar, ponerse a la defensiva

"Oh, let up on this cussed nonsense; do you take me for a blame'fool? Don't you reckon I know who hid that money in that coffin?"

nonsense - tonterías; tontería, tontada, tontuna, disparate

"Yes, sir! I know you do know, because you done it yourself!"

"It's a lie!""and the duke went for him. The king sings out:

"Take y'r hands off!"leggo my throat!"I take it all back!"

The duke says:

"Well, you just own up, first, that you did hide that money there, intending to give me the slip one of these days, and come back and dig it up, and have it all to yourself."

intending - con intención; pretender, planear, intencionar, intentar

"Wait jest a minute, duke"answer me this one question, honest and fair; if you didn't put the money there, say it, and I'll b'lieve you, and take back everything I said."

"You old scoundrel, I didn't, and you know I didn't. There, now!"

"Well, then, I b'lieve you. But answer me only jest this one more"now don't git mad; didn't you have it in your mind to hook the money and hide it?"

Hook - gancho, garfio, enganchar

The duke never said nothing for a little bit; then he says:

"Well, I don't care if I did, I didn't do it, anyway. But you not only had it in mind to do it, but you done it."

"I wisht I never die if I done it, duke, and that's honest. I won't say I warn't goin'to do it, because I was; but you"I mean somebody"got in ahead o'me."

"It's a lie! You done it, and you got to say you done it, or""

The king began to gurgle, and then he gasps out:

gurgle - gorgoreo; gluglú

"'Nough!"I own up!"

I was very glad to hear him say that; it made me feel much more easier than what I was feeling before. So the duke took his hands off and says:

"If you ever deny it again I'll drown you. It's well for you to set there and blubber like a baby"it's fitten for you, after the way you've acted. I never see such an old ostrich for wanting to gobble everything"and I a-trusting you all the time, like you was my own father. You ought to been ashamed of yourself to stand by and hear it saddled on to a lot of poor niggers, and you never say a word for 'em.

deny - Negar

ostrich - avestruz

gobble - engullir, devorar, zamparse

saddled - ensillado; (bici) sillín, silla (de montar)

It makes me feel ridiculous to think I was soft enough to believe that rubbage. Cuss you, I can see now why you was so anxious to make up the deffisit"you wanted to get what money I'd got out of the Nonesuch and one thing or another, and scoop it all!"

ridiculous - ridículo

anxious - ansioso, inquieto, deseoso

The king says, timid, and still a-snuffling:

snuffling - Resoplando; (snuffle) Resoplando

"Why, duke, it was you that said make up the deffisit; it warn't me."

"dry up! I don't want to hear no more out of you!" says the duke. "And now you see what you got by it. They've got all their own money back, and all of ourn but a shekel or two besides. G'long to bed, and don't you deffersit me no more deffersits, long 's you live!"

dry up - secarse, resecarse

shekel - séquel, siclo

deffersits - Definiciones

So the king sneaked into the wigwam and took to his bottle for comfort, and before long the duke tackled his bottle; and so in about a half an hour they was as thick as thieves again, and the tighter they got the lovinger they got, and went off a-snoring in each other's arms.

sneaked - a escondidas; pillo, moverse con sigilo, esconder, escabullir

tighter - más ajustado; apretado, ajustado, tensado, tensionado, tenso

lovinger - amoroso

They both got powerful mellow, but I noticed the king didn't get mellow enough to forget to remember to not deny about hiding the money-bag again. That made me feel easy and satisfied. Of course when they got to snoring we had a long gabble, and I told Jim everything.

mellow - suave; mantecoso, relajado, blando

deny - negar

gabble - farfullar, parlotear, hablar atropelladamente

CHAPTER XXXI.

We dasn't stop again at any town for days and days; kept right along down the river. We was down south in the warm weather now, and a mighty long ways from home. We begun to come to trees with Spanish moss on them, hanging down from the limbs like long, gray beards.

beards - barbas; barba, jotera, pantalla, barbar, provocar, mortificar

It was the first I ever see it growing, and it made the woods look solemn and dismal. So now the frauds reckoned they was out of danger, and they begun to work the villages again.

First they done a lecture on temperance; but they didn't make enough for them both to get drunk on. Then in another village they started a dancing-school; but they didn't know no more how to dance than a kangaroo does; so the first prance they made the general public jumped in and pranced them out of town. Another time they tried to go at yellocution; but they didn't yellocute long till the audience got up and give them a solid good cussing, and made them skip out.

get drunk - Emborracharse

kangaroo - canguro

prance - encabritarse

yellocution - Gelocución

They tackled missionarying, and mesmerizing, and doctoring, and telling fortunes, and a little of everything; but they couldn't seem to have no luck. So at last they got just about dead broke, and laid around the raft as she floated along, thinking and thinking, and never saying nothing, by the half a day at a time, and dreadful blue and desperate.

fortunes - ortunas; fortuna

desperate - desesperado

And at last they took a change and begun to lay their heads together in the wigwam and talk low and confidential two or three hours at a time. Jim and me got uneasy. We didn't like the look of it. We judged they was studying up some kind of worse deviltry than ever. We turned it over and over, and at last we made up our minds they was going to break into somebody's house or store, or was going into the counterfeit-money business, or something. So then we was pretty scared, and made up an agreement that we wouldn't have nothing in the world to do with such actions, and if we ever got the least show we would give them the cold shake and clear out and leave them behind.

confidential - confidencial

counterfeit-money - (counterfeit-money) dinero falso

agreement - acuerdo, convenio, contrato, concordancia

Well, early one morning we hid the raft in a good, safe place about two mile below a little bit of a shabby village named Pikesville, and the king he went ashore and told us all to stay hid whilst he went up to town and smelt around to see if anybody had got any wind of the Royal Nonesuch there yet. ("House to rob, you mean," says I to myself; "and when you get through robbing it you'll come back here and wonder what has become of me and Jim and the raft"and you'll have to take it out in wondering.") And he said if he warn't back by midday the duke and me would know it was all right, and we was to come along.

shabby - desalinado; raído, astroso, zarrapastroso, cutre, harapiento

midday - mediodía

So we stayed where we was. The duke he fretted and sweated around, and was in a mighty sour way. He scolded us for everything, and we couldn't seem to do nothing right; he found fault with every little thing. Something was a-brewing, sure. I was good and glad when midday come and no king; we could have a change, anyway"and maybe a chance for the change on top of it. So me and the duke went up to the village, and hunted around there for the king, and by-and-by we found him in the back room of a little low doggery, very tight, and a lot of loafers bullyragging him for sport, and he a-cussing and a-threatening with all his might, and so tight he couldn't walk, and couldn't do nothing to them.

fretted - inquieto; preocuparse

sweated - sudó; sudor

scolded - renido; reganar, retar, renir

brewing - cervando; elaboración de cerveza; (brew) cervando; elaboración de cerveza

doggery - perrería

threatening - amenazante; amenazador; (threaten); amenazar

The duke he begun to abuse him for an old fool, and the king begun to sass back, and the minute they was fairly at it I lit out and shook the reefs out of my hind legs, and spun down the river road like a deer, for I see our chance; and I made up my mind that it would be a long day before they ever see me and Jim again. I got down there all out of breath but loaded up with joy, and sung out:

abuse - Abuso

spun - hilado; hacer girar

deer - ciervo, venado

"Set her loose, Jim! we're all right now!"

But there warn't no answer, and nobody come out of the wigwam. Jim was gone! I set up a shout"and then another"and then another one; and run this way and that in the woods, whooping and screeching; but it warn't no use"old Jim was gone. Then I set down and cried; I couldn't help it.

screeching - chillando; chirrido, rechinar, chirriar, estridular

But I couldn't set still long. Pretty soon I went out on the road, trying to think what I better do, and I run across a boy walking, and asked him if he'd seen a strange nigger dressed so and so, and he says:

"Yes."

"Whereabouts?" says I.

"Down to Silas Phelps'place, two mile below here. He's a runaway nigger, and they've got him. Was you looking for him?"

"You bet I ain't! I run across him in the woods about an hour or two ago, and he said if I hollered he'd cut my livers out"and told me to lay down and stay where I was; and I done it. Been there ever since; afeard to come out."

livers - hígados; hígado

"Well," he says, "you needn't be afeard no more, becuz they've got him. He run off f'm down South, som'ers."

"It's a good job they got him."

"Well, I reckon! There's two hunderd dollars reward on him. It's like picking up money out'n the road."

hunderd - Dunderd

"Yes, it is"and I could a had it if I'd been big enough; I see him first. Who nailed him?"

"It was an old fellow"a stranger"and he sold out his chance in him for forty dollars, becuz he's got to go up the river and can't wait. Think o'that, now! You bet I'd wait, if it was seven year."

"That's me, every time," says I. "But maybe his chance ain't worth no more than that, if he'll sell it so cheap. Maybe there's something ain't straight about it."

"But it is, though"straight as a string. I see the handbill myself. It tells all about him, to a dot"paints him like a picture, and tells the plantation he's frum, below Newrleans. No-sirree-bob, they ain't no trouble 'bout that speculation, you bet you. Say, gimme a chaw tobacker, won't ye?"

sirree - Senor

speculation - especulación

I didn't have none, so he left. I went to the raft, and set down in the wigwam to think. But I couldn't come to nothing. I thought till I wore my head sore, but I couldn't see no way out of the trouble.

After all this long journey, and after all we'd done for them scoundrels, here it was all come to nothing, everything all busted up and ruined, because they could have the heart to serve Jim such a trick as that, and make him a slave again all his life, and amongst strangers, too, for forty dirty dollars.

scoundrels - sinvergüenzas; bribón, canalla, bellaco, villano

Once I said to myself it would be a thousand times better for Jim to be a slave at home where his family was, as long as he'd got to be a slave, and so I'd better write a letter to Tom Sawyer and tell him to tell Miss Watson where he was. But I soon give up that notion for two things: she'd be mad and disgusted at his rascality and ungratefulness for leaving her, and so she'd sell him straight down the river again; and if she didn't, everybody naturally despises an ungrateful nigger, and they'd make Jim feel it all the time, and so he'd feel ornery and disgraced. And then think of me! It would get all around that Huck Finn helped a nigger to get his freedom; and if I was ever to see anybody from that town again I'd be ready to get down and lick his boots for shame. That's just the way: a person does a low-down thing, and then he don't want to take no consequences of it. Thinks as long as he can hide it, it ain't no disgrace. That was my fix exactly. The more I studied about this the more my conscience went to grinding me, and the more wicked and low-down and ornery I got to feeling.

disgusted - asqueado; repugnar, dar asco, asquear, asco, repugnancia

rascality - Bribonería

ungratefulness - desagradecimiento

despises - esprecia; desdenar

disgraced - deshonrado; desgracia, baldón, deshonrar

consequences - consecuencias; consecuencia

grinding - moliendo; molienda; (grind) moliendo; molienda

And at last, when it hit me all of a sudden that here was the plain hand of Providence slapping me in the face and letting me know my wickedness was being watched all the time from up there in heaven, whilst I was stealing a poor old woman's nigger that hadn't ever done me no harm, and now was showing me there's One that's always on the lookout, and ain't a-going to allow no such miserable doings to go only just so fur and no further, I most dropped in my tracks I was so scared. Well, I tried the best I could to kinder soften it up somehow for myself by saying I was brung up wicked, and so I warn't so much to blame; but something inside of me kept saying, "There was the Sunday-school, you could a gone to it; and if you'd a done it they'd a learnt you there that people that acts as I'd been acting about that nigger goes to everlasting fire."

slapping - abofetadas; bofetada, cachetada, abofetear, cachetear, golpear

wickedness - maldad, perversidad

doings - Haciendo

soften - ablandar, suavizar

everlasting - perpetua; inmarcesible

It made me shiver. And I about made up my mind to pray, and see if I couldn't try to quit being the kind of a boy I was and be better. So I kneeled down. But the words wouldn't come. Why wouldn't they? It warn't no use to try and hide it from Him. Nor from me, neither. I knowed very well why they wouldn't come. It was because my heart warn't right; it was because I warn't square; it was because I was playing double. I was letting on to give up sin, but away inside of me I was holding on to the biggest one of all.

I was trying to make my mouth say I would do the right thing and the clean thing, and go and write to that nigger's owner and tell where he was; but deep down in me I knowed it was a lie, and He knowed it. You can't pray a lie"I found that out.

So I was full of trouble, full as I could be; and didn't know what to do. At last I had an idea; and I says, I'll go and write the letter"and then see if I can pray. Why, it was astonishing, the way I felt as light as a feather right straight off, and my troubles all gone. So I got a piece of paper and a pencil, all glad and excited, and set down and wrote:

astonishing - asombroso; asombrar, sorprender, pasmar

Miss Watson, your runaway nigger Jim is down here two mile below Pikesville, and Mr. Phelps has got him and he will give him up for the reward if you send.

HUCK FINN.

I felt good and all washed clean of sin for the first time I had ever felt so in my life, and I knowed I could pray now. But I didn't do it straight off, but laid the paper down and set there thinking"thinking how good it was all this happened so, and how near I come to being lost and going to hell. And went on thinking. And got to thinking over our trip down the river; and I see Jim before me all the time: in the day and in the night-time, sometimes moonlight, sometimes storms, and we a-floating along, talking and singing and laughing. But somehow I couldn't seem to strike no places to harden me against him, but only the other kind.

hell - infierno

harden - Se endurece

I'd see him standing my watch on top of his'n, 'stead of calling me, so I could go on sleeping; and see him how glad he was when I come back out of the fog; and when I come to him again in the swamp, up there where the feud was; and such-like times; and would always call me honey, and pet me and do everything he could think of for me, and how good he always was; and at last I struck the time I saved him by telling the men we had small-pox aboard, and he was so grateful, and said I was the best friend old Jim ever had in the world, and the only one he's got now; and then I happened to look around and see that paper.

It was a close place. I took it up, and held it in my hand. I was a-trembling, because I'd got to decide, forever, betwixt two things, and I knowed it. I studied a minute, sort of holding my breath, and then says to myself:

"All right, then, I'll go to hell""and tore it up.

It was awful thoughts and awful words, but they was said. And I let them stay said; and never thought no more about reforming. I shoved the whole thing out of my head, and said I would take up wickedness again, which was in my line, being brung up to it, and the other warn't.

thoughts - pensamientos; pensamiento

reforming - reforma, reformar

And for a starter I would go to work and steal Jim out of slavery again; and if I could think up anything worse, I would do that, too; because as long as I was in, and in for good, I might as well go the whole hog.

starter - arrancador; motor de arranque, estárter, cebador, entrada

Then I set to thinking over how to get at it, and turned over some considerable many ways in my mind; and at last fixed up a plan that suited me. So then I took the bearings of a woody island that was down the river a piece, and as soon as it was fairly dark I crept out with my raft and went for it, and hid it there, and then turned in. I slept the night through, and got up before it was light, and had my breakfast, and put on my store clothes, and tied up some others and one thing or another in a bundle, and took the canoe and cleared for shore.

bearings - Rodamiento

I landed below where I judged was Phelps's place, and hid my bundle in the woods, and then filled up the canoe with water, and loaded rocks into her and sunk her where I could find her again when I wanted her, about a quarter of a mile below a little steam sawmill that was on the bank.

filled up - lleno

Then I struck up the road, and when I passed the mill I see a sign on it, "Phelps's Sawmill," and when I come to the farm-houses, two or three hundred yards further along, I kept my eyes peeled, but didn't see nobody around, though it was good daylight now. But I didn't mind, because I didn't want to see nobody just yet"I only wanted to get the lay of the land. According to my plan, I was going to turn up there from the village, not from below.

Mill - molinillo

So I just took a look, and shoved along, straight for town. Well, the very first man I see when I got there was the duke. He was sticking up a bill for the Royal Nonesuch"three-night performance"like that other time. They had the cheek, them frauds! I was right on him before I could shirk. He looked astonished, and says:

sticking up - subir

performance - endimiento; actuación, cumplimiento, ejecución, desempeno

shirk - esquivar

"Hel-lo! Where'd you come from?" Then he says, kind of glad and eager, "Where's the raft?"got her in a good place?"

I says:

"Why, that's just what I was going to ask your grace."

Then he didn't look so joyful, and says:

"What was your idea for asking me?" he says.

"Well," I says, "when I see the king in that doggery yesterday I says to myself, we can't get him home for hours, till he's soberer; so I went a-loafing around town to put in the time and wait. A man up and offered me ten cents to help him pull a skiff over the river and back to fetch a sheep, and so I went along; but when we was dragging him to the boat, and the man left me a-holt of the rope and went behind him to shove him along, he was too strong for me and jerked loose and run, and we after him. We didn't have no dog, and so we had to chase him all over the country till we tired him out. We never got him till dark; then we fetched him over, and I started down for the raft.

soberer - más sobrio; sobrio, sereno, apagado

loafing - Haciendo el vago; (loaf) Haciendo el vago

When I got there and see it was gone, I says to myself, 'They've got into trouble and had to leave; and they've took my nigger, which is the only nigger I've got in the world, and now I'm in a strange country, and ain't got no property no more, nor nothing, and no way to make my living;'so I set down and cried. I slept in the woods all night. But what did become of the raft, then?"and Jim"poor Jim!"

"Blamed if I know"that is, what's become of the raft. That old fool had made a trade and got forty dollars, and when we found him in the doggery the loafers had matched half-dollars with him and got every cent but what he'd spent for whisky; and when I got him home late last night and found the raft gone, we said, ˜That little rascal has stole our raft and shook us, and run off down the river.'"

trade - comercio, gremio, compraventa, comerciar, mercadear, trocar

"I wouldn't shake my nigger, would I?"the only nigger I had in the world, and the only property."

"We never thought of that. Fact is, I reckon we'd come to consider him our nigger; yes, we did consider him so"goodness knows we had trouble enough for him. So when we see the raft was gone and we flat broke, there warn't anything for it but to try the Royal Nonesuch another shake. And I've pegged along ever since, dry as a powder-horn. Where's that ten cents? Give it here."

pegged - clavado; clavija, tarugo, colgador, perchero, gancho, fijar

horn - cuerno

I had considerable money, so I give him ten cents, but begged him to spend it for something to eat, and give me some, because it was all the money I had, and I hadn't had nothing to eat since yesterday. He never said nothing. The next minute he whirls on me and says:

"Do you reckon that nigger would blow on us? We'd skin him if he done that!"

"How can he blow? Hain't he run off?"

"No! That old fool sold him, and never divided with me, and the money's gone."

"Sold him?" I says, and begun to cry; "why, he was my nigger, and that was my money. Where is he?"I want my nigger."

"Well, you can't get your nigger, that's all"so dry up your blubbering. Looky here"do you think you'd venture to blow on us? Blamed if I think I'd trust you. Why, if you was to blow on us""

Venture - aventurarse; aventura, arriesgar

He stopped, but I never see the duke look so ugly out of his eyes before. I went on a-whimpering, and says:

"I don't want to blow on nobody; and I ain't got no time to blow, nohow. I got to turn out and find my nigger."

He looked kinder bothered, and stood there with his bills fluttering on his arm, thinking, and wrinkling up his forehead. At last he says:

bothered - molestado; molestar, agobiar, cansón, joroba, rayos, caramba

fluttering - agitación; ondear, aletear

wrinkling - se arruga; arruga

"I'll tell you something. We got to be here three days. If you'll promise you won't blow, and won't let the nigger blow, I'll tell you where to find him."

So I promised, and he says:

"A farmer by the name of Silas Ph"" and then he stopped. You see, he started to tell me the truth; but when he stopped that way, and begun to study and think again, I reckoned he was changing his mind. And so he was. He wouldn't trust me; he wanted to make sure of having me out of the way the whole three days. So pretty soon he says:

"The man that bought him is named Abram Foster"Abram G. Foster"and he lives forty mile back here in the country, on the road to Lafayette."

foster - acoger, criar

"All right," I says, "I can walk it in three days. And I'll start this very afternoon."

"No you wont, you'll start now; and don't you lose any time about it, neither, nor do any gabbling by the way. Just keep a tight tongue in your head and move right along, and then you won't get into trouble with us, d'ye hear?"

wont - no

gabbling - Cotorreando; (gabble) Cotorreando

That was the order I wanted, and that was the one I played for. I wanted to be left free to work my plans.

"So clear out," he says; "and you can tell Mr. Foster whatever you want to. Maybe you can get him to believe that Jim is your nigger"some idiots don't require documents"leastways I've heard there's such down South here. And when you tell him the handbill and the reward's bogus, maybe he'll believe you when you explain to him what the idea was for getting 'em out.

require - necesitas; requerir, necesitar

bogus - falso, falsificado, adulterado, trapicheado, averiado

Go 'long now, and tell him anything you want to; but mind you don't work your jaw any between here and there."

So I left, and struck for the back country. I didn't look around, but I kinder felt like he was watching me. But I knowed I could tire him out at that. I went straight out in the country as much as a mile before I stopped; then I doubled back through the woods towards Phelps'. I reckoned I better start in on my plan straight off without fooling around, because I wanted to stop Jim's mouth till these fellows could get away.

I didn't want no trouble with their kind. I'd seen all I wanted to of them, and wanted to get entirely shut of them.

CHAPTER XXXII.

When I got there it was all still and Sunday-like, and hot and sunshiny; the hands was gone to the fields; and there was them kind of faint dronings of bugs and flies in the air that makes it seem so lonesome and like everybody's dead and gone; and if a breeze fans along and quivers the leaves it makes you feel mournful, because you feel like it's spirits whispering"spirits that's been dead ever so many years"and you always think they're talking about you.

sunshiny - brillante

dronings - Zumbidos

quivers - aljabas; estremecer(se)

As a general thing it makes a body wish he was dead, too, and done with it all.

Phelps'was one of these little one-horse cotton plantations, and they all look alike.

plantations - lantaciones; plantación

A rail fence round a two-acre yard; a stile made out of logs sawed off and up-ended in steps, like barrels of a different length, to climb over the fence with, and for the women to stand on when they are going to jump on to a horse; some sickly grass-patches in the big yard, but mostly it was bare and smooth, like an old hat with the nap rubbed off; big double log-house for the white folks"hewed logs, with the chinks stopped up with mud or mortar, and these mud-stripes been whitewashed some time or another; round-log kitchen, with a big broad, open but roofed passage joining it to the house; log smoke-house back of the kitchen; three little log nigger-cabins in a row t'other side the smoke-house; one little hut all by itself away down against the back fence, and some outbuildings down a piece the other side; ash-hopper and big kettle to bile soap in by the little hut; bench by the kitchen door, with bucket of water and a gourd; hound asleep there in the sun; more hounds asleep round about; about three shade trees away off in a corner; some currant bushes and gooseberry bushes in one place by the fence; outside of the fence a garden and a watermelon patch; then the cotton fields begins, and after the fields the woods.

Acre - acre

sawed off - serruchar

Length - largo, eslora (nautical: length of a ship from bow to stern)

patches - parches; remiendo, parche

rubbed off - borrar

hewed - tallado; cortar, tajar, talar

stopped up - frenar; tapar; acostarse tarde

mortar - mortero, argamasa, almirez, pilón

stripes - rayas; franja, raya, línea, lista, galón

cabins - cabinas; barraca, cabana, cabina, camarote

ash-hopper - (ash-hopper) depósito de cenizas

kettle - pava; hervidor, tetera

hounds - sabuesos; perro de caza

currant - pasa de Corinto, grosella, grosellero

gooseberry - grosella espinosa; grosella, sujetavelas

I went around and clumb over the back stile by the ash-hopper, and started for the kitchen. When I got a little ways I heard the dim hum of a spinning-wheel wailing along up and sinking along down again; and then I knowed for certain I wished I was dead"for that is the lonesomest sound in the whole world.

hopper - Tolva

spinning-wheel - (spinning-wheel) rueda giratoria

wailing - aullidos; (wail) aullidos

sinking - se hunde; hundimiento, naufragio; (sink); hundir, sumergir

lonesomest - el más solitario

I went right along, not fixing up any particular plan, but just trusting to Providence to put the right words in my mouth when the time come; for I'd noticed that Providence always did put the right words in my mouth if I left it alone.

When I got half-way, first one hound and then another got up and went for me, and of course I stopped and faced them, and kept still. And such another powwow as they made!

In a quarter of a minute I was a kind of a hub of a wheel, as you may say"spokes made out of dogs"circle of fifteen of them packed together around me, with their necks and noses stretched up towards me, a-barking and howling; and more a-coming; you could see them sailing over fences and around corners from everywheres.

spokes - rayos; radio, rayo

barking - ladrando; ladrido

A nigger woman come tearing out of the kitchen with a rolling-pin in her hand, singing out, "Begone you Tige! you Spot! begone sah!" and she fetched first one and then another of them a clip and sent them howling, and then the rest followed; and the next second half of them come back, wagging their tails around me, and making friends with me. There ain't no harm in a hound, nohow.

tearing out - arrancar

begone - Desaparecer

wagging - meneo; menear, panish: t-needed

making friends - hacer amigos

And behind the woman comes a little nigger girl and two little nigger boys without anything on but tow-linen shirts, and they hung on to their mother's gown, and peeped out from behind her at me, bashful, the way they always do. And here comes the white woman running from the house, about forty-five or fifty year old, bareheaded, and her spinning-stick in her hand; and behind her comes her little white children, acting the same way the little niggers was doing.

bashful - tímido

She was smiling all over so she could hardly stand"and says:

"It's you, at last!"ain't it?"

I out with a "Yes'm" before I thought.

She grabbed me and hugged me tight; and then gripped me by both hands and shook and shook; and the tears come in her eyes, and run down over; and she couldn't seem to hug and shake enough, and kept saying, "You don't look as much like your mother as I reckoned you would; but law sakes, I don't care for that, I'm so glad to see you! Dear, dear, it does seem like I could eat you up! Children, it's your cousin Tom!"tell him howdy."

howdy - Qué tal

But they ducked their heads, and put their fingers in their mouths, and hid behind her. So she run on:

ducked - agachado; hundir, sumergir

"Lize, hurry up and get him a hot breakfast right away"or did you get your breakfast on the boat?"

I said I had got it on the boat. So then she started for the house, leading me by the hand, and the children tagging after. When we got there she set me down in a split-bottomed chair, and set herself down on a little low stool in front of me, holding both of my hands, and says:

tagging - etiquetado; etiqueta

stool - heces; taburete

"Now I can have a good look at you; and, laws-a-me, I've been hungry for it a many and a many a time, all these long years, and it's come at last! We been expecting you a couple of days and more. What kep'you?"boat get aground?"

aground - encallado, varado

"Yes'm"she""

"Don't say yes'm"say Aunt Sally. Where'd she get aground?"

sally - salida

I didn't rightly know what to say, because I didn't know whether the boat would be coming up the river or down. But I go a good deal on instinct; and my instinct said she would be coming up"from down towards Orleans. That didn't help me much, though; for I didn't know the names of bars down that way. I see I'd got to invent a bar, or forget the name of the one we got aground on"or"Now I struck an idea, and fetched it out:

instinct - instinto

"It warn't the grounding"that didn't keep us back but a little. We blowed out a cylinder-head."

cylinder - cilindro, bombona

"good gracious! anybody hurt?"

good gracious - !Dios mío!

"No'm. Killed a nigger."

"Well, it's lucky; because sometimes people do get hurt. Two years ago last Christmas your uncle Silas was coming up from Newrleans on the old Lally Rook, and she blowed out a cylinder-head and crippled a man. And I think he died afterwards. He was a Baptist. Your uncle Silas knowed a family in Baton Rouge that knowed his people very well. Yes, I remember now, he did die. Mortification set in, and they had to amputate him.

rook - graja; grajo

Baptist - bautista

baton - batón; batuta, porra, testigo

mortification - Mortificación

amputate - amputar

But it didn't save him. Yes, it was mortification"that was it. He turned blue all over, and died in the hope of a glorious resurrection. They say he was a sight to look at. Your uncle's been up to the town every day to fetch you. And he's gone again, not more'n an hour ago; he'll be back any minute now. You must a met him on the road, didn't you?"oldish man, with a""

glorious - glorioso

resurrection - resurrección

"No, I didn't see nobody, Aunt Sally. The boat landed just at daylight, and I left my baggage on the wharf-boat and went looking around the town and out a piece in the country, to put in the time and not get here too soon; and so I come down the back way."

wharf - embarcadero, muelle

"Who'd you give the baggage to?"

"Nobody."

"Why, child, it 'll be stole!"

"Not where I hid it I reckon it won't," I says.

"How'd you get your breakfast so early on the boat?"

It was kinder thin ice, but I says:

"The captain see me standing around, and told me I better have something to eat before I went ashore; so he took me in the texas to the officers'lunch, and give me all I wanted."

I was getting so uneasy I couldn't listen good. I had my mind on the children all the time; I wanted to get them out to one side and pump them a little, and find out who I was. But I couldn't get no show, Mrs. Phelps kept it up and run on so. Pretty soon she made the cold chills streak all down my back, because she says:

pump - bomba

"But here we're a-running on this way, and you hain't told me a word about Sis, nor any of them. Now I'll rest my works a little, and you start up yourn; just tell me everything"tell me all about 'm all every one of 'm; and how they are, and what they're doing, and what they told you to tell me; and every last thing you can think of."

Well, I see I was up a stump"and up it good. Providence had stood by me this fur all right, but I was hard and tight aground now. I see it warn't a bit of use to try to go ahead"I'd got to throw up my hand. So I says to myself, here's another place where I got to resk the truth. I opened my mouth to begin; but she grabbed me and hustled me in behind the bed, and says:

another place - otro lugar

"Here he comes! Stick your head down lower"there, that'll do; you can't be seen now. Don't you let on you're here. I'll play a joke on him. Children, don't you say a word."

I see I was in a fix now. But it warn't no use to worry; there warn't nothing to do but just hold still, and try and be ready to stand from under when the lightning struck.

I had just one little glimpse of the old gentleman when he come in; then the bed hid him. Mrs. Phelps she jumps for him, and says:

"Has he come?"

"No," says her husband.

"Good-ness gracious!" she says, "what in the warld can have become of him?"

warld - Guerra

"I can't imagine," says the old gentleman; "and I must say it makes me dreadful uneasy."

"Uneasy!" she says; "I'm ready to go distracted! He must a come; and you've missed him along the road. I know it's so"something tells me so."

I'm ready - Estoy listo

distracted - distraído; distraer, despistar

"Why, Sally, I couldn't miss him along the road"you know that."

"But oh, dear, dear, what will Sis say! He must a come! You must a missed him. He""

"Oh, don't distress me any more'n I'm already distressed. I don't know what in the world to make of it. I'm at my wit's end, and I don't mind acknowledging 't I'm right down scared. But there's no hope that he's come; for he couldn't come and me miss him. Sally, it's terrible"just terrible"something's happened to the boat, sure!"

distressed - angustiado; aflicción, angustia, desasosiego, ansiedad

acknowledging - reconociendo; reconocer, acusar recibo

I'm right - Estoy en lo cierto

"Why, Silas! Look yonder!"up the road!"ain't that somebody coming?"

He sprung to the window at the head of the bed, and that give Mrs. Phelps the chance she wanted. She stooped down quick at the foot of the bed and give me a pull, and out I come; and when he turned back from the window there she stood, a-beaming and a-smiling like a house afire, and I standing pretty meek and sweaty alongside. The old gentleman stared, and says:

beaming - rayos; radiante; (beam); viga, timón, radio

meek - dócil; modesto, humilde, resignado, sumiso, manso

sweaty - Sudoroso

"Why, who's that?"

"Who do you reckon 't is?"

"I hain't no idea. Who is it?"

"It's Tom Sawyer!"

By jings, I most slumped through the floor! But there warn't no time to swap knives; the old man grabbed me by the hand and shook, and kept on shaking; and all the time how the woman did dance around and laugh and cry; and then how they both did fire off questions about Sid, and Mary, and the rest of the tribe.

slumped - se desplomó; desfallecer, desplomarse, bajón

fire off - Disparar

Now I was feeling pretty comfortable all down one side, and pretty uncomfortable all up the other. Being Tom Sawyer was easy and comfortable, and it stayed easy and comfortable till by-and-by I hear a steamboat coughing along down the river. Then I says to myself, s'pose Tom Sawyer comes down on that boat? And s'pose he steps in here any minute, and sings out my name before I can throw him a wink to keep quiet?

Well, I couldn't have it that way; it wouldn't do at all. I must go up the road and waylay him. So I told the folks I reckoned I would go up to the town and fetch down my baggage. The old gentleman was for going along with me, but I said no, I could drive the horse myself, and I druther he wouldn't take no trouble about me.

waylay - maylay; abordar, coger por banda

going along - ir, aceptar, seguirle la corriente a alguien

CHAPTER XXXIII.

So I started for town in the wagon, and when I was half-way I see a wagon coming, and sure enough it was Tom Sawyer, and I stopped and waited till he come along. I says "Hold on!" and it stopped alongside, and his mouth opened up like a trunk, and stayed so; and he swallowed two or three times like a person that's got a dry throat, and then says:

swallowed - tragado; tragar, engullir

"I hain't ever done you no harm. You know that. So, then, what you want to come back and ha'nt me for?"

I says:

"I hain't come back"I hain't been gone."

When he heard my voice it righted him up some, but he warn't quite satisfied yet. He says:

"Don't you play nothing on me, because I wouldn't on you. Honest injun now, you ain't a ghost?"

"Honest injun, I ain't," I says.

"Well"I"I"well, that ought to settle it, of course; but I can't somehow seem to understand it no way. Looky here, warn't you ever murdered at all?"

"No. I warn't ever murdered at all"I played it on them. You come in here and feel of me if you don't believe me."

So he done it; and it satisfied him; and he was that glad to see me again he didn't know what to do. And he wanted to know all about it right off, because it was a grand adventure, and mysterious, and so it hit him where he lived.

But I said, leave it alone till by-and-by; and told his driver to wait, and we drove off a little piece, and I told him the kind of a fix I was in, and what did he reckon we better do? He said, let him alone a minute, and don't disturb him. So he thought and thought, and pretty soon he says:

"It's all right; I've got it. Take my trunk in your wagon, and let on it's your'n; and you turn back and fool along slow, so as to get to the house about the time you ought to; and I'll go towards town a piece, and take a fresh start, and get there a quarter or a half an hour after you; and you needn't let on to know me at first."

I says:

"All right; but wait a minute. There's one more thing"a thing that nobody don't know but me. And that is, there's a nigger here that I'm a-trying to steal out of slavery, and his name is Jim"old Miss Watson's Jim."

He says:

"What! Why, Jim is""

He stopped and went to studying. I says:

"I know what you'll say. You'll say it's dirty, low-down business; but what if it is? I'm low down; and I'm a-going to steal him, and I want you keep mum and not let on. Will you?"

His eye lit up, and he says:

"I'll help you steal him!"

Well, I let go all holts then, like I was shot. It was the most astonishing speech I ever heard"and I'm bound to say Tom Sawyer fell considerable in my estimation. Only I couldn't believe it. Tom Sawyer a nigger stealer!

estimation - estimación; valoración

stealer - Robador

"Oh, shucks!" I says; "you're joking."

"I ain't joking, either."

"Well, then," I says, "joking or no joking, if you hear anything said about a runaway nigger, don't forget to remember that you don't know nothing about him, and I don't know nothing about him."

Then we took the trunk and put it in my wagon, and he drove off his way and I drove mine. But of course I forgot all about driving slow on accounts of being glad and full of thinking; so I got home a heap too quick for that length of a trip. The old gentleman was at the door, and he says:

being glad - estar contento

"Why, this is wonderful! Whoever would a thought it was in that mare to do it? I wish we'd a timed her. And she hain't sweated a hair"not a hair. It's wonderful. Why, I wouldn't take a hundred dollars for that horse now"I wouldn't, honest; and yet I'd a sold her for fifteen before, and thought 'twas all she was worth."

mare - yegua

In about half an hour Tom's wagon drove up to the front stile, and Aunt Sally she see it through the window, because it was only about fifty yards, and says:

"Why, there's somebody come! I wonder who 'tis? Why, I do believe it's a stranger. Jimmy" (that's one of the children) "run and tell Lize to put on another plate for dinner."

Jimmy - palanqueta

Everybody made a rush for the front door, because, of course, a stranger don't come every year, and so he lays over the yaller-fever, for interest, when he does come. Tom was over the stile and starting for the house; the wagon was spinning up the road for the village, and we was all bunched in the front door. Tom had his store clothes on, and an audience"and that was always nuts for Tom Sawyer.

In them circumstances it warn't no trouble to him to throw in an amount of style that was suitable. He warn't a boy to meeky along up that yard like a sheep; no, he come ca'm and important, like the ram. When he got a-front of us he lifts his hat ever so gracious and dainty, like it was the lid of a box that had butterflies asleep in it and he didn't want to disturb them, and says:

suitable - adecuado; apropiado, indicado

dainty - delicado, manoso

butterflies - mariposas; mariposa

"Mr. Archibald Nichols, I presume?"

"No, my boy," says the old gentleman, "I'm sorry to say 't your driver has deceived you; Nichols's place is down a matter of three mile more. Come in, come in."

deceived - enganado; enganar, decebir

Tom he took a look back over his shoulder, and says, "Too late"he's out of sight."

"Yes, he's gone, my son, and you must come in and eat your dinner with us; and then we'll hitch up and take you down to Nichols's."

"Oh, I can't make you so much trouble; I couldn't think of it. I'll walk"I don't mind the distance."

"But we won't let you walk"it wouldn't be Southern hospitality to do it. Come right in."

hospitality - hospitalidad, hostelería

"Oh, do," says Aunt Sally; "it ain't a bit of trouble to us, not a bit in the world. You must stay. It's a long, dusty three mile, and we can't let you walk. And, besides, I've already told 'em to put on another plate when I see you coming; so you mustn't disappoint us. Come right in and make yourself at home."

disappoint - decepcionar, desilusionar, defraudar, quedar mal

So Tom he thanked them very hearty and handsome, and let himself be persuaded, and come in; and when he was in he said he was a stranger from Hicksville, Ohio, and his name was William Thompson"and he made another bow.

hearty - corazonoso; carinoso, de corazón, cordial, corpulento, nutritivo

persuaded - persuadido; persuadir

"You owdacious puppy!"

owdacious - wdacious

puppy - cachorro, perrito

He looked kind of hurt, and says:

"I'm surprised at you, m'am."

I'm surprised - Me sorprende

"You're s'rp"Why, what do you reckon I am? I've a good notion to take and"Say, what do you mean by kissing me?"

He looked kind of humble, and says:

"I didn't mean nothing, m'am. I didn't mean no harm. I"I"thought you'd like it."

"Why, you born fool!" She took up the spinning stick, and it looked like it was all she could do to keep from giving him a crack with it. "What made you think I'd like it?"

"Well, I don't know. Only, they"they"told me you would."

"They told you I would. Whoever told you's another lunatic. I never heard the beat of it. Who's they?"

lunatic - insano, orate, lunático

"Why, everybody. They all said so, m'am."

It was all she could do to hold in; and her eyes snapped, and her fingers worked like she wanted to scratch him; and she says:

"Who's ˜everybody'? Out with their names, or ther'll be an idiot short."

He got up and looked distressed, and fumbled his hat, and says:

fumbled - falló; buscar/revolver a tientas/torpemente, manejar torpemente

"I'm sorry, and I warn't expecting it. They told me to. They all told me to. They all said, kiss her; and said she'd like it. They all said it"every one of them. But I'm sorry, m'am, and I won't do it no more"I won't, honest."

"You won't, won't you? Well, I sh'd reckon you won't!"

"No'm, I'm honest about it; I won't ever do it again"till you ask me."

"Till I ask you! Well, I never see the beat of it in my born days! I lay you'll be the Methusalem-numskull of creation before ever I ask you"or the likes of you."

creation - creación

"Well," he says, "it does surprise me so. I can't make it out, somehow. They said you would, and I thought you would. But"" He stopped and looked around slow, like he wished he could run across a friendly eye somewheres, and fetched up on the old gentleman's, and says, "Didn't you think she'd like me to kiss her, sir?"

"Why, no; I"I"well, no, I b'lieve I didn't."

Then he looks on around the same way to me, and says:

"Tom, didn't you think Aunt Sally 'd open out her arms and say, ˜Sid Sawyer"˜"

"My land!" she says, breaking in and jumping for him, "you impudent young rascal, to fool a body so"" and was going to hug him, but he fended her off, and says:

breaking in - forzar la puerta; interrumpir

impudent - imprudente; insolente, descarado, fresco

fended - fended; defenderse

"No, not till you've asked me first."

not till - no hasta

So she didn't lose no time, but asked him; and hugged him and kissed him over and over again, and then turned him over to the old man, and he took what was left. And after they got a little quiet again she says:

"Why, Dear me, I never see such a surprise. We warn't looking for you at all, but only Tom. Sis never wrote to me about anybody coming but him."

Dear me - !Vaya!

"It's because it warn't intended for any of us to come but Tom," he says; "but I begged and begged, and at the last minute she let me come, too; so, coming down the river, me and Tom thought it would be a first-rate surprise for him to come here to the house first, and for me to by-and-by tag along and drop in, and let on to be a stranger. But it was a mistake, Aunt Sally. This ain't no healthy place for a stranger to come."

intended - pretendías; planeado; (intend); pretender, planear, intencionar

tag - etiqueta

"No"not impudent whelps, Sid. You ought to had your jaws boxed; I hain't been so put out since I don't know when. But I don't care, I don't mind the terms"I'd be willing to stand a thousand such jokes to have you here. Well, to think of that performance! I don't deny it, I was most putrified with astonishment when you give me that smack."

whelps - Cachorro

putrified - utrificado

Smack - bofetada; dar una palmada

We had dinner out in that broad open passage betwixt the house and the kitchen; and there was things enough on that table for seven families"and all hot, too; none of your flabby, tough meat that's laid in a cupboard in a damp cellar all night and tastes like a hunk of old cold cannibal in the morning. Uncle Silas he asked a pretty long blessing over it, but it was worth it; and it didn't cool it a bit, neither, the way I've seen them kind of interruptions do lots of times.

flabby - flacidez; flácido, fofo, lacio

cannibal - caníbal

blessing - bendición; (bless); bendición

interruptions - interrupciones; interrupción, paréntesis

There was a considerable good deal of talk all the afternoon, and me and Tom was on the lookout all the time; but it warn't no use, they didn't happen to say nothing about any runaway nigger, and we was afraid to try to work up to it. But at supper, at night, one of the little boys says:

work up - trabajar; corregir; prepararse

"Pa, mayn't Tom and Sid and me go to the show?"

"No," says the old man, "I reckon there ain't going to be any; and you couldn't go if there was; because the runaway nigger told Burton and me all about that scandalous show, and Burton said he would tell the people; so I reckon they've drove the owdacious loafers out of town before this time."

So there it was!"but I couldn't help it. Tom and me was to sleep in the same room and bed; so, being tired, we bid good-night and went up to bed right after supper, and clumb out of the window and down the lightning-rod, and shoved for the town; for I didn't believe anybody was going to give the king and the duke a hint, and so if I didn't hurry up and give them one they'd get into trouble sure.

bid - ofertar; pujar, hacer una oferta

lightning-rod - (lightning-rod) Pararrayos

On the road Tom he told me all about how it was reckoned I was murdered, and how pap disappeared pretty soon, and didn't come back no more, and what a stir there was when Jim run away; and I told Tom all about our Royal Nonesuch rapscallions, and as much of the raft voyage as I had time to; and as we struck into the town and up through the the middle of it--it was as much as half-after eight, then"here comes a raging rush of people with torches, and an awful whooping and yelling, and banging tin pans and blowing horns; and we jumped to one side to let them go by; and as they went by I see they had the king and the duke astraddle of a rail"that is, I knowed it was the king and the duke, though they was all over tar and feathers, and didn't look like nothing in the world that was human"just looked like a couple of monstrous big soldier-plumes.

Voyage - viaje

torches - linternas; antorcha, incendiar

banging - golpeando; portazo, golpe estrepitoso

horns - cuernos; cuerno

feathers - plumas; pluma

plumes - plumas; pluma

Well, it made me sick to see it; and I was sorry for them poor pitiful rascals, it seemed like I couldn't ever feel any hardness against them any more in the world. It was a dreadful thing to see. Human beings can be awful cruel to one another.

hardness - dureza

beings - seres; ser, criatura, existencia

We see we was too late"couldn't do no good. We asked some stragglers about it, and they said everybody went to the show looking very innocent; and laid low and kept dark till the poor old king was in the middle of his cavortings on the stage; then somebody give a signal, and the house rose up and went for them.

stragglers - rezagados; rezagado, vago

cavortings - Cabriolas

So we poked along back home, and I warn't feeling so brash as I was before, but kind of ornery, and humble, and to blame, somehow"though I hadn't done nothing. But that's always the way; it don't make no difference whether you do right or wrong, a person's conscience ain't got no sense, and just goes for him anyway. If I had a yaller dog that didn't know no more than a person's conscience does I would pison him. It takes up more room than all the rest of a person's insides, and yet ain't no good, nohow.

Tom Sawyer he says the same.

CHAPTER XXXIV.

We stopped talking, and got to thinking. By-and-by Tom says:

"Looky here, Huck, what fools we are to not think of it before! I bet I know where Jim is."

"No! Where?"

"In that hut down by the ash-hopper. Why, looky here. When we was at dinner, didn't you see a nigger man go in there with some vittles?"

"Yes."

"What did you think the vittles was for?"

"For a dog."

"So 'd I. Well, it wasn't for a dog."

"Why?"

"Because part of it was watermelon."

"So it was"I noticed it. Well, it does beat all that I never thought about a dog not eating watermelon. It shows how a body can see and don't see at the same time."

"Well, the nigger unlocked the padlock when he went in, and he locked it again when he came out. He fetched uncle a key about the time we got up from table"same key, I bet. Watermelon shows man, lock shows prisoner; and it ain't likely there's two prisoners on such a little plantation, and where the people's all so kind and good. Jim's the prisoner. All right"I'm glad we found it out detective fashion; I wouldn't give shucks for any other way. Now you work your mind, and study out a plan to steal Jim, and I will study out one, too; and we'll take the one we like the best.

padlock - candado, candar, asegurar

prisoners - prisioneros; prisionero, preso

What a head for just a boy to have! If I had Tom Sawyer's head I wouldn't trade it off to be a duke, nor mate of a steamboat, nor clown in a circus, nor nothing I can think of. I went to thinking out a plan, but only just to be doing something; I knowed very well where the right plan was going to come from. Pretty soon Tom says:

"Ready?"

"Yes," I says.

"All right"bring it out."

"My plan is this," I says. "We can easy find out if it's Jim in there. Then get up my canoe to-morrow night, and fetch my raft over from the island. Then the first dark night that comes steal the key out of the old man's britches after he goes to bed, and shove off down the river on the raft with Jim, hiding daytimes and running nights, the way me and Jim used to do before. Wouldn't that plan work?"

"Work? Why, cert'nly it would work, like rats a-fighting. But it's too blame'simple; there ain't nothing to it. What's the good of a plan that ain't no more trouble than that? It's as mild as goose-milk. Why, Huck, it wouldn't make no more talk than breaking into a soap factory."

mild - suave, leve, cálido

goose - ganso

I never said nothing, because I warn't expecting nothing different; but I knowed mighty well that whenever he got his plan ready it wouldn't have none of them objections to it.

And it didn't. He told me what it was, and I see in a minute it was worth fifteen of mine for style, and would make Jim just as free a man as mine would, and maybe get us all killed besides. So I was satisfied, and said we would waltz in on it.

I needn't tell what it was here, because I knowed it wouldn't stay the way, it was. I knowed he would be changing it around every which way as we went along, and heaving in new bullinesses wherever he got a chance. And that is what he done.

Well, one thing was dead sure, and that was that Tom Sawyer was in earnest, and was actuly going to help steal that nigger out of slavery. That was the thing that was too many for me. Here was a boy that was respectable and well brung up; and had a character to lose; and folks at home that had characters; and he was bright and not leather-headed; and knowing and not ignorant; and not mean, but kind; and yet here he was, without any more pride, or rightness, or feeling, than to stoop to this business, and make himself a shame, and his family a shame, before everybody.

dead sure - Segurísimo

pride - orgullo, soberbia, cachondez, toriondez, verriondez, manada

rightness - derecho

stoop - inclinarse, agacharse

I couldn't understand it no way at all. It was outrageous, and I knowed I ought to just up and tell him so; and so be his true friend, and let him quit the thing right where he was and save himself. And I did start to tell him; but he shut me up, and says:

"Don't you reckon I know what I'm about? Don't I generly know what I'm about?"

"Yes."

"Didn't I say I was going to help steal the nigger?"

"Yes."

"Well, then."

That's all he said, and that's all I said. It warn't no use to say any more; because when he said he'd do a thing, he always done it. But I couldn't make out how he was willing to go into this thing; so I just let it go, and never bothered no more about it. If he was bound to have it so, I couldn't help it.

When we got home the house was all dark and still; so we went on down to the hut by the ash-hopper for to examine it. We went through the yard so as to see what the hounds would do. They knowed us, and didn't make no more noise than country dogs is always doing when anything comes by in the night.

examine - examinar, analizar, auscultar

When we got to the cabin we took a look at the front and the two sides; and on the side I warn't acquainted with"which was the north side"we found a square window-hole, up tolerable high, with just one stout board nailed across it. I says:

stout - cerveza; sólido, fuerte

"Here's the ticket. This hole's big enough for Jim to get through if we wrench off the board."

wrench - llave inglesa; arrancar

Tom says:

"It's as simple as tit-tat-toe, three-in-a-row, and as easy as playing hooky. I should hope we can find a way that's a little more complicated than that, Huck Finn."

tit - teta; paro, herrerillo

hooky - hacer novillos

complicated - complicado; complicar

"Well, then," I says, "how 'll it do to saw him out, the way I done before I was murdered that time?"

"That's more like," he says. "It's real mysterious, and troublesome, and good," he says; "but I bet we can find a way that's twice as long. There ain't no hurry; le's keep on looking around."

Betwixt the hut and the fence, on the back side, was a lean-to that joined the hut at the eaves, and was made out of plank. It was as long as the hut, but narrow"only about six foot wide. The door to it was at the south end, and was padlocked. Tom he went to the soap-kettle and searched around, and fetched back the iron thing they lift the lid with; so he took it and prized out one of the staples. The chain fell down, and we opened the door and went in, and shut it, and struck a match, and see the shed was only built against a cabin and hadn't no connection with it; and there warn't no floor to the shed, nor nothing in it but some old rusty played-out hoes and spades and picks and a crippled plow.

eaves - Alero

padlocked - con candado; candado, candar, asegurar

fetched back - se ha recuperado

staples - grapas; de primera necesidad

connection - vinculación, conexión, trabazón, ligazón

hoes - zorras; azada, azadón

spades - picas; pala

plow - Arado

The match went out, and so did we, and shoved in the staple again, and the door was locked as good as ever. Tom was joyful. He says;

staple - grapa; de primera necesidad

"Now we're all right. We'll dig him out. It 'll take about a week!"

Then we started for the house, and I went in the back door"you only have to pull a buckskin latch-string, they don't fasten the doors"but that warn't romantical enough for Tom Sawyer; no way would do him but he must climb up the lightning-rod.

fasten - atar, abrochar

romantical - Romántico

climb up - subir

But after he got up half way about three times, and missed fire and fell every time, and the last time most busted his brains out, he thought he'd got to give it up; but after he was rested he allowed he would give her one more turn for luck, and this time he made the trip.

In the morning we was up at break of day, and down to the nigger cabins to pet the dogs and make friends with the nigger that fed Jim"if it was Jim that was being fed. The niggers was just getting through breakfast and starting for the fields; and Jim's nigger was piling up a tin pan with bread and meat and things; and whilst the others was leaving, the key come from the house.

make friends - hacer amigos

getting through - superar, terminar, comunicarse con, pasar por

piling up - amontonar, apilar, acumular

This nigger had a good-natured, chuckle-headed face, and his wool was all tied up in little bunches with thread. That was to keep witches off. He said the witches was pestering him awful these nights, and making him see all kinds of strange things, and hear all kinds of strange words and noises, and he didn't believe he was ever witched so long before in his life.

good-natured - (good-natured) Buen carácter, buena gente

Wool - lana

bunches - ramos; manojo, punado, (flowers) ramo, bonchote, racimo, grupo

pestering - molestando; atosigar, molestar, dar la tabarra, jorobar

witched - brujo; bruja

He got so worked up, and got to running on so about his troubles, he forgot all about what he'd been a-going to do. So Tom says:

"What's the vittles for? Going to feed the dogs?"

The nigger kind of smiled around gradually over his face, like when you heave a brickbat in a mud-puddle, and he says:

gradually - gradualmente, poco a poco, paulatinamente

brickbat - Bickbat

puddle - un charco; charco, poza

"Yes, Mars Sid, a dog. Cur'us dog, too. Does you want to go en look at 'im?"

cur - chucho, quiltro

"Yes."

I hunched Tom, and whispers:

"You going, right here in the daybreak? That warn't the plan."

"No, it warn't; but it's the plan now."

So, drat him, we went along, but I didn't like it much. When we got in we couldn't hardly see anything, it was so dark; but Jim was there, sure enough, and could see us; and he sings out:

"Why, Huck! En good lan'! ain'dat Misto Tom?"

I just knowed how it would be; I just expected it. I didn't know nothing to do; and if I had I couldn't a done it, because that nigger busted in and says:

"Why, de gracious sakes! do he know you genlmen?"

We could see pretty well now. Tom he looked at the nigger, steady and kind of wondering, and says:

"Does who know us?"

"Why, dis-yer runaway nigger."

"I don't reckon he does; but what put that into your head?"

"What put it dar? Didn'he jis'dis minute sing out like he knowed you?"

Tom says, in a puzzled-up kind of way:

"Well, that's mighty curious. Who sung out? When did he sing out? what did he sing out?" And turns to me, perfectly ca'm, and says, "Did you hear anybody sing out?"

Of course there warn't nothing to be said but the one thing; so I says:

"No; I ain't heard nobody say nothing."

Then he turns to Jim, and looks him over like he never see him before, and says:

"Did you sing out?"

"No, sah," says Jim; "I hain't said nothing, sah."

"Not a word?"

"No, sah, I hain't said a word."

"Did you ever see us before?"

"No, sah; not as I knows on."

So Tom turns to the nigger, which was looking wild and distressed, and says, kind of severe:

severe - severo, grave, austero

"What do you reckon's the matter with you, anyway? What made you think somebody sung out?"

"Oh, it's de dad-blame'witches, sah, en I wisht I was dead, I do. Dey's awluz at it, sah, en dey do mos'kill me, dey sk'yers me so. Please to don't tell nobody 'bout it sah, er ole Mars Silas he'll scole me; 'kase he say dey ain't no witches. I jis'wish to goodness he was heah now"den what would he say!

scole - Burlarse

I jis'bet he couldn'fine no way to git aroun'it dis time. But it's awluz jis'so; people dat's sot, stays sot; dey won't look into noth'n'en fine it out f'r deyselves, en when you fine it out en tell um 'bout it, dey doan'b'lieve you."

deyselves - a sí mismos

Tom give him a dime, and said we wouldn't tell nobody; and told him to buy some more thread to tie up his wool with; and then looks at Jim, and says:

dime - moneda de diez centavos

"I wonder if Uncle Silas is going to hang this nigger. If I was to catch a nigger that was ungrateful enough to run away, I wouldn't give him up, I'd hang him." And whilst the nigger stepped to the door to look at the dime and bite it to see if it was good, he whispers to Jim and says:

ungrateful - desagradecido, ingrato, malagradecido

"Don't ever let on to know us. And if you hear any digging going on nights, it's us; we're going to set you free."

Jim only had time to grab us by the hand and squeeze it; then the nigger come back, and we said we'd come again some time if the nigger wanted us to; and he said he would, more particular if it was dark, because the witches went for him mostly in the dark, and it was good to have folks around then.

more particular - más particular

CHAPTER XXXV.

"Blame it, this whole thing is just as easy and awkward as it can be. And so it makes it so rotten difficult to get up a difficult plan. There ain't no watchman to be drugged"now there ought to be a watchman. There ain't even a dog to give a sleeping-mixture to. And there's Jim chained by one leg, with a ten-foot chain, to the leg of his bed: why, all you got to do is to lift up the bedstead and slip off the chain. And Uncle Silas he trusts everybody; sends the key to the punkin-headed nigger, and don't send nobody to watch the nigger. Jim could a got out of that window-hole before this, only there wouldn't be no use trying to travel with a ten-foot chain on his leg. Why, drat it, Huck, it's the stupidest arrangement I ever see.

mixture - mezcla

chained - encadenado; cadena, encadenar

bedstead - cama (sin#Spanish

slip off - salir a escondidas; quitarse; descalzarse

trusts - fideicomisos; confianza, crédito, fiar, consorcio, trust

You got to invent all the difficulties. Well, we can't help it; we got to do the best we can with the materials we've got. Anyhow, there's one thing"there's more honor in getting him out through a lot of difficulties and dangers, where there warn't one of them furnished to you by the people who it was their duty to furnish them, and you had to contrive them all out of your own head. Now look at just that one thing of the lantern. When you come down to the cold facts, we simply got to let on that a lantern's resky. Why, we could work with a torchlight procession if we wanted to, I believe. Now, whilst I think of it, we got to hunt up something to make a saw out of the first chance we get."

difficulties - dificultades; dificultad

furnished - amueblado; amoblar, amueblar, suministrar, proporcionar, dotar

contrive - inventar; idear, improvisar

Simply - simplemente, sencillamente

torchlight - Linterna

"What do we want of a saw?"

"What do we want of it? Hain't we got to saw the leg of Jim's bed off, so as to get the chain loose?"

"Why, you just said a body could lift up the bedstead and slip the chain off."

"Well, if that ain't just like you, Huck Finn. You can get up the infant-schooliest ways of going at a thing. Why, hain't you ever read any books at all?"Baron Trenck, nor Casanova, nor Benvenuto Chelleeny, nor Henri IV., nor none of them heroes? Who ever heard of getting a prisoner loose in such an old-maidy way as that? No; the way all the best authorities does is to saw the bed-leg in two, and leave it just so, and swallow the sawdust, so it can't be found, and put some dirt and grease around the sawed place so the very keenest seneskal can't see no sign of it's being sawed, and thinks the bed-leg is perfectly sound. Then, the night you're ready, fetch the leg a kick, down she goes; slip off your chain, and there you are.

schooliest - El más escolar

Baron - barón

prisoner - prisionero, preso

maidy - Sirvienta

keenest - el más entusiasta; entusiasta

seneskal - Senescal

Nothing to do but hitch your rope ladder to the battlements, shin down it, break your leg in the moat"because a rope ladder is nineteen foot too short, you know"and there's your horses and your trusty vassles, and they scoop you up and fling you across a saddle, and away you go to your native Langudoc, or Navarre, or wherever it is. It's gaudy, Huck. I wish there was a moat to this cabin. If we get time, the night of the escape, we'll dig one."

rope ladder - escalera de cuerda

battlements - lmenas; almenaje

moat - fosa, foso

vassles - vasos

escape - escapar, liberarse, fugarse, eludir

I says:

"What do we want of a moat when we're going to snake him out from under the cabin?"

But he never heard me. He had forgot me and everything else. He had his chin in his hand, thinking. Pretty soon he sighs and shakes his head; then sighs again, and says:

sighs - suspirar

"No, it wouldn't do"there ain't necessity enough for it."

necessity - necesidad, menester

"For what?" I says.

"Why, to saw Jim's leg off," he says.

"Good land!" I says; "why, there ain't no necessity for it. And what would you want to saw his leg off for, anyway?"

"Well, some of the best authorities has done it. They couldn't get the chain off, so they just cut their hand off and shoved. And a leg would be better still. But we got to let that go. There ain't necessity enough in this case; and, besides, Jim's a nigger, and wouldn't understand the reasons for it, and how it's the custom in Europe; so we'll let it go.

But there's one thing"he can have a rope ladder; we can tear up our sheets and make him a rope ladder easy enough. And we can send it to him in a pie; it's mostly done that way. And I've et worse pies."

tear up - romper en pedazos; llenarse los ojos de lágrimas

et - y; ET

pies - pasteles; tarta, empanada, pastel

"Why, Tom Sawyer, how you talk," I says; "Jim ain't got no use for a rope ladder."

"He has got use for it. How you talk, you better say; you don't know nothing about it. He's got to have a rope ladder; they all do."

"What in the nation can he do with it?"

"Do with it? He can hide it in his bed, can't he?" That's what they all do; and he's got to, too. Huck, you don't ever seem to want to do anything that's regular; you want to be starting something fresh all the time. S'pose he don't do nothing with it?

ain't it there in his bed, for a clew, after he's gone? and don't you reckon they'll want clews? Of course they will. And you wouldn't leave them any? That would be a pretty howdy-do, wouldn't it! I never heard of such a thing."

"Well," I says, "if it's in the regulations, and he's got to have it, all right, let him have it; because I don't wish to go back on no regulations; but there's one thing, Tom Sawyer"if we go to tearing up our sheets to make Jim a rope ladder, we're going to get into trouble with Aunt Sally, just as sure as you're born.

regulations - reglamentos; reglamento, regulación

Now, the way I look at it, a hickry-bark ladder don't cost nothing, and don't waste nothing, and is just as good to load up a pie with, and hide in a straw tick, as any rag ladder you can start; and as for Jim, he ain't had no experience, and so he don't care what kind of a""

load up - Cargar

"Oh, shucks, Huck Finn, if I was as ignorant as you I'd keep still"that's what I'd do. Who ever heard of a state prisoner escaping by a hickry-bark ladder? Why, it's perfectly ridiculous."

state prisoner - Preso del Estado

escaping - escapando; escapar, liberarse, fugarse, eludir

"Well, all right, Tom, fix it your own way; but if you'll take my advice, you'll let me borrow a sheet off of the clothesline."

clothesline - tendedero; tendal

He said that would do. And that gave him another idea, and he says:

"Borrow a shirt, too."

"What do we want of a shirt, Tom?"

"Want it for Jim to keep a journal on."

journal - diario; revista

"Journal your granny"Jim can't write."

"S'pose he can't write"he can make marks on the shirt, can't he, if we make him a pen out of an old pewter spoon or a piece of an old iron barrel-hoop?"

pewter - estano; peltre

Hoop - aro

"Why, Tom, we can pull a feather out of a goose and make him a better one; and quicker, too."

"Prisoners don't have geese running around the donjon-keep to pull pens out of, you muggins. They always make their pens out of the hardest, toughest, troublesomest piece of old brass candlestick or something like that they can get their hands on; and it takes them weeks and weeks and months and months to file it out, too, because they've got to do it by rubbing it on the wall.

geese - Gansos

toughest - el más duro; resistente, severo, de mano dura, ni modo

troublesomest - el más problemático

file - fichero; fila

They wouldn't use a goose-quill if they had it. It ain't regular."

quill - cálamo, pluma, púa

"Well, then, what'll we make him the ink out of?"

"Many makes it out of iron-rust and tears; but that's the common sort and women; the best authorities uses their own blood. Jim can do that; and when he wants to send any little common ordinary mysterious message to let the world know where he's captivated, he can write it on the bottom of a tin plate with a fork and throw it out of the window. The Iron Mask always done that, and it's a blame'good way, too."

rust - oxido; óxido

captivated - cautivado; cautivar

mask - máscara, careta, mascarilla

"Jim ain't got no tin plates. They feed him in a pan."

"That ain't nothing; we can get him some."

"Can't nobody read his plates."

"That ain't got anything to do with it, Huck Finn. All he's got to do is to write on the plate and throw it out. You don't have to be able to read it. Why, half the time you can't read anything a prisoner writes on a tin plate, or anywhere else."

"Well, then, what's the sense in wasting the plates?"

"Why, blame it all, it ain't the prisoner's plates."

"But it's somebody's plates, ain't it?"

"Well, spos'n it is? What does the prisoner care whose""

spos - pos

He broke off there, because we heard the breakfast-horn blowing. So we cleared out for the house.

Along during the morning I borrowed a sheet and a white shirt off of the clothes-line; and I found an old sack and put them in it, and we went down and got the fox-fire, and put that in too. I called it borrowing, because that was what pap always called it; but Tom said it warn't borrowing, it was stealing. He said we was representing prisoners; and prisoners don't care how they get a thing so they get it, and nobody don't blame them for it, either. It ain't no crime in a prisoner to steal the thing he needs to get away with, Tom said; it's his right; and so, as long as we was representing a prisoner, we had a perfect right to steal anything on this place we had the least use for to get ourselves out of prison with. He said if we warn't prisoners it would be a very different thing, and nobody but a mean, ornery person would steal when he warn't a prisoner.

fox - zorro, zorra, raposo, traposa

representing - representando; representar

So we allowed we would steal everything there was that come handy. And yet he made a mighty fuss, one day, after that, when I stole a watermelon out of the nigger-patch and eat it; and he made me go and give the niggers a dime without telling them what it was for. Tom said that what he meant was, we could steal anything we needed. Well, I says, I needed the watermelon. But he said I didn't need it to get out of prison with; there's where the difference was. He said if I'd a wanted it to hide a knife in, and smuggle it to Jim to kill the seneskal with, it would a been all right. So I let it go at that, though I couldn't see no advantage in my representing a prisoner if I got to set down and chaw over a lot of gold-leaf distinctions like that every time I see a chance to hog a watermelon.

smuggle - contrabandear, pasar de contrabando

distinctions - distinciones; distinción

Well, as I was saying, we waited that morning till everybody was settled down to business, and nobody in sight around the yard; then Tom he carried the sack into the lean-to whilst I stood off a piece to keep watch. By-and-by he come out, and we went and set down on the woodpile to talk. He says:

"Everything's all right now except tools; and that's easy fixed."

"Tools?" I says.

"Yes."

"Tools for what?"

"Why, to dig with. We ain't a-going to gnaw him out, are we?"

"Ain't them old crippled picks and things in there good enough to dig a nigger out with?" I says.

He turns on me, looking pitying enough to make a body cry, and says:

pitying - compasión, piedad, lástima, pena, tener lástima

"Huck Finn, did you ever hear of a prisoner having picks and shovels, and all the modern conveniences in his wardrobe to dig himself out with? Now I want to ask you"if you got any reasonableness in you at all"what kind of a show would that give him to be a hero? Why, they might as well lend him the key and done with it. Picks and shovels"why, they wouldn't furnish 'em to a king."

wardrobe - ropa; armario, ropero, clóset, escaparate

"Well, then," I says, "if we don't want the picks and shovels, what do we want?"

"A couple of case-knives."

"To dig the foundations out from under that cabin with?"

foundations - fundaciones; fundación, cimiento, base

"Yes."

"Confound it, it's foolish, Tom."

"It don't make no difference how foolish it is, it's the right way"and it's the regular way. And there ain't no other way, that ever I heard of, and I've read all the books that gives any information about these things. They always dig out with a case-knife"and not through dirt, mind you; generly it's through solid rock.

And it takes them weeks and weeks and weeks, and for ever and ever. Why, look at one of them prisoners in the bottom dungeon of the Castle Deef, in the harbor of Marseilles, that dug himself out that way; how long was he at it, you reckon?"

dungeon - mazmorra, calabozo

Marseilles - Marsella

"I don't know."

"Well, guess."

"I don't know. A month and a half."

"Thirty-seven year"and he come out in China. That's the kind. I wish the bottom of this fortress was solid rock."

fortress - fortaleza

"Jim don't know nobody in China."

"What's that got to do with it? Neither did that other fellow. But you're always a-wandering off on a side issue. Why can't you stick to the main point?"

wandering - deambulando; errabundo, andariego, errante, peripatético

side issue - problema secundario

"All right"I don't care where he comes out, so he comes out; and Jim don't, either, I reckon. But there's one thing, anyway"Jim's too old to be dug out with a case-knife. He won't last."

"Yes he will last, too. You don't reckon it's going to take thirty-seven years to dig out through a dirt foundation, do you?"

foundation - fundación, cimiento, base

"How long will it take, Tom?"

"Well, we can't resk being as long as we ought to, because it mayn't take very long for Uncle Silas to hear from down there by New Orleans. He'll hear Jim ain't from there. Then his next move will be to advertise Jim, or something like that. So we can't resk being as long digging him out as we ought to. By rights I reckon we ought to be a couple of years; but we can't. Things being so uncertain, what I recommend is this: that we really dig right in, as quick as we can; and after that, we can let on, to ourselves, that we was at it thirty-seven years.

uncertain - incierto

Then we can snatch him out and rush him away the first time there's an alarm. Yes, I reckon that 'll be the best way."

"Now, there's sense in that," I says. "Letting on don't cost nothing; letting on ain't no trouble; and if it's any object, I don't mind letting on we was at it a hundred and fifty year. It wouldn't strain me none, after I got my hand in. So I'll mosey along now, and smouch a couple of case-knives."

"Smouch three," he says; "we want one to make a saw out of."

"Tom, if it ain't unregular and irreligious to sejest it," I says, "there's an old rusty saw-blade around yonder sticking under the weather-boarding behind the smoke-house."

irreligious - irreligioso

blade - cuchilla, hoja, cuchillo (said of a dagger), espada, pala, aspa

He looked kind of weary and discouraged-like, and says:

weary - cansado, cansino, cansar

discouraged - desanimado; descorazonar, acobardar, desalentar, persuadir

"It ain't no use to try to learn you nothing, Huck. Run along and smouch the knives"three of them." So I done it.

CHAPTER XXXVI.

As soon as we reckoned everybody was asleep that night we went down the lightning-rod, and shut ourselves up in the lean-to, and got out our pile of fox-fire, and went to work. We cleared everything out of the way, about four or five foot along the middle of the bottom log. Tom said he was right behind Jim's bed now, and we'd dig in under it, and when we got through there couldn't nobody in the cabin ever know there was any hole there, because Jim's counter-pin hung down most to the ground, and you'd have to raise it up and look under to see the hole.

counter - Contador

So we dug and dug with the case-knives till most midnight; and then we was dog-tired, and our hands was blistered, and yet you couldn't see we'd done anything hardly. At last I says:

blistered - con ampollas; ampolla, ámpula, ampollar

"This ain't no thirty-seven year job; this is a thirty-eight year job, Tom Sawyer."

He never said nothing. But he sighed, and pretty soon he stopped digging, and then for a good little while I knowed that he was thinking. Then he says:

sighed - suspiró; suspirar

"It ain't no use, Huck, it ain't a-going to work. If we was prisoners it would, because then we'd have as many years as we wanted, and no hurry; and we wouldn't get but a few minutes to dig, every day, while they was changing watches, and so our hands wouldn't get blistered, and we could keep it up right along, year in and year out, and do it right, and the way it ought to be done.

But we can't fool along; we got to rush; we ain't got no time to spare. If we was to put in another night this way we'd have to knock off for a week to let our hands get well"couldn't touch a case-knife with them sooner."

knock off - acabar

"Well, then, what we going to do, Tom?"

"I'll tell you. It ain't right, and it ain't moral, and I wouldn't like it to get out; but there ain't only just the one way: we got to dig him out with the picks, and let on it's case-knives."

"Now you're talking!" I says; "your head gets leveler and leveler all the time, Tom Sawyer," I says. "Picks is the thing, moral or no moral; and as for me, I don't care shucks for the morality of it, nohow. When I start in to steal a nigger, or a watermelon, or a Sunday-school book, I ain't no ways particular how it's done so it's done.

leveler - Nivelador

morality - moralidad

What I want is my nigger; or what I want is my watermelon; or what I want is my Sunday-school book; and if a pick's the handiest thing, that's the thing I'm a-going to dig that nigger or that watermelon or that Sunday-school book out with; and I don't give a dead rat what the authorities thinks about it nuther."

"Well," he says, "there's excuse for picks and letting-on in a case like this; if it warn't so, I wouldn't approve of it, nor I wouldn't stand by and see the rules broke"because right is right, and wrong is wrong, and a body ain't got no business doing wrong when he ain't ignorant and knows better.

Excuse - disculpe; excusar, perdonar, panish: t-needed

approve - aprobar; tener un buen concepto de

It might answer for you to dig Jim out with a pick, without any letting on, because you don't know no better; but it wouldn't for me, because I do know better. Gimme a case-knife."

He had his own by him, but I handed him mine. He flung it down, and says:

"Gimme a case-knife."

I didn't know just what to do"but then I thought. I scratched around amongst the old tools, and got a pickaxe and give it to him, and he took it and went to work, and never said a word.

scratched - rayado; rascar, raspar, aranar, rasgunar, rayar, aranazo

pickaxe - pico

He was always just that particular. Full of principle.

principle - principio

So then I got a shovel, and then we picked and shoveled, turn about, and made the fur fly. We stuck to it about a half an hour, which was as long as we could stand up; but we had a good deal of a hole to show for it. When I got up stairs I looked out at the window and see Tom doing his level best with the lightning-rod, but he couldn't come it, his hands was so sore. At last he says:

shoveled - pala, traspalar, palear

turn about - dar la vuelta

"It ain't no use, it can't be done. What you reckon I better do? Can't you think of no way?"

"Yes," I says, "but I reckon it ain't regular. Come up the stairs, and let on it's a lightning-rod."

So he done it.

Next day Tom stole a pewter spoon and a brass candlestick in the house, for to make some pens for Jim out of, and six tallow candles; and I hung around the nigger cabins and laid for a chance, and stole three tin plates.

tallow - sebo

Tom says it wasn't enough; but I said nobody wouldn't ever see the plates that Jim throwed out, because they'd fall in the dog-fennel and jimpson weeds under the window-hole"then we could tote them back and he could use them over again. So Tom was satisfied. Then he says:

fennel - hinojo

"Now, the thing to study out is, how to get the things to Jim."

"Take them in through the hole," I says, "when we get it done."

He only just looked scornful, and said something about nobody ever heard of such an idiotic idea, and then he went to studying. By-and-by he said he had ciphered out two or three ways, but there warn't no need to decide on any of them yet. Said we'd got to post Jim first.

That night we went down the lightning-rod a little after ten, and took one of the candles along, and listened under the window-hole, and heard Jim snoring; so we pitched it in, and it didn't wake him. Then we whirled in with the pick and shovel, and in about two hours and a half the job was done. We crept in under Jim's bed and into the cabin, and pawed around and found the candle and lit it, and stood over Jim awhile, and found him looking hearty and healthy, and then we woke him up gentle and gradual. He was so glad to see us he most cried; and called us honey, and all the pet names he could think of; and was for having us hunt up a cold-chisel to cut the chain off of his leg with right away, and clearing out without losing any time. But Tom he showed him how unregular it would be, and set down and told him all about our plans, and how we could alter them in a minute any time there was an alarm; and not to be the least afraid, because we would see he got away, sure.

crept in - Entrar a hurtadillas

gradual - gradual, paulatino

cold-chisel - (cold-chisel) cortafrío

clearing out - se está despejando

alter - cambiar, modificar, alterar

So Jim he said it was all right, and we set there and talked over old times awhile, and then Tom asked a lot of questions, and when Jim told him Uncle Silas come in every day or two to pray with him, and Aunt Sally come in to see if he was comfortable and had plenty to eat, and both of them was kind as they could be, Tom says:

"Now I know how to fix it. We'll send you some things by them."