Little Women with English-Spanish Dictionary by Louisa M. Alcott (online free books)

Les Quatre Filles du docteur March con un práctico diccionario inglés-espanol (best ebooks to read)


Table of Content

PART 1
CHAPTER ONE. PLAYING PILGRIMS
CHAPTER TWO. A MERRY CHRISTMAS
CHAPTER THREE. THE LAURENCE BOY
CHAPTER FOUR. BURDENS
CHAPTER FIVE. BEING NEIGHBORLY
CHAPTER SIX. BETH FINDS THE PALACE BEAUTIFUL
CHAPTER SEVEN. AMY'S VALLEY OF HUMILIATION
CHAPTER EIGHT. JO MEETS APOLLYON
CHAPTER NINE. MEG GOES TO VANITY FAIR
CHAPTER TEN. THE P.C. AND P.O.
CHAPTER ELEVEN. EXPERIMENTS
CHAPTER TWELVE. CAMP LAURENCE
CHAPTER THIRTEEN. CASTLES IN THE AIR
CHAPTER FOURTEEN. SECRETS
CHAPTER FIFTEEN. A TELEGRAM
CHAPTER SIXTEEN. LETTERS
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN. LITTLE FAITHFUL
CHAPTER EIGHTEEN. DARK DAYS
CHAPTER NINETEEN. AMY'S WILL
CHAPTER TWENTY. CONFIDENTIAL
CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE. LAURIE MAKES MISCHIEF, AND JO MAKES PEACE
CHAPTER TWENTY-TWO. PLEASANT MEADOWS
CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE. AUNT MARCH SETTLES THE QUESTION
PART 2
CHAPTER TWENTY-FOUR. GOSSIP
CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE. THE FIRST WEDDING
CHAPTER TWENTY-SIX. ARTISTIC ATTEMPTS
CHAPTER TWENTY-SEVEN. LITERARY LESSONS
CHAPTER TWENTY-EIGHT. DOMESTIC EXPERIENCES
CHAPTER TWENTY-NINE. CALLS
CHAPTER THIRTY. CONSEQUENCES
CHAPTER THIRTY-ONE. OUR FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT
CHAPTER THIRTY-TWO. TENDER TROUBLES
CHAPTER THIRTY-THREE. JO'S JOURNAL
CHAPTER THIRTY-FOUR. FRIEND
CHAPTER THIRTY-FIVE. HEARTACHE
CHAPTER THIRTY-SIX. BETH'S SECRET
CHAPTER THIRTY-SEVEN. NEW IMPRESSIONS
CHAPTER THIRTY-EIGHT. ON THE SHELF
CHAPTER THIRTY-NINE. LAZY LAURENCE
CHAPTER FORTY. THE VALLEY OF THE SHADOW
CHAPTER FORTY-ONE. LEARNING TO FORGET
CHAPTER FORTY-TWO. ALL ALONE
CHAPTER FORTY-THREE. SURPRISES
CHAPTER FORTY-FOUR. MY LORD AND LADY
CHAPTER FORTY-FIVE. DAISY AND DEMI
CHAPTER FORTY-SIX. UNDER THE UMBRELLA
CHAPTER FORTY-SEVEN. HARVEST TIME

Little Women Text

PART 1

CHAPTER ONE. PLAYING PILGRIMS

pilgrims - peregrinos; peregrino, colonista

"Christmas won't be Christmas without any presents," grumbled Jo, lying on the rug.

Christmas - Navidad

grumbled - refunfunó; refunfunar, rezongar

rug - tapete, alfombra, alfombrilla

"It's so dreadful to be poor!" sighed Meg, looking down at her old dress.

dreadful - terrible; espantoso, espantosa

sighed - suspiró; suspirar

"I don't think it's fair for some girls to have plenty of pretty things, and other girls nothing at all," added little Amy, with an injured sniff.

sniff - oler; olfatear, esnifar, husmear, checksorber

"We've got Father and Mother, and each other," said Beth contentedly from her corner.

ve - e

contentedly - Contento

The four young faces on which the firelight shone brightened at the cheerful words, but darkened again as Jo said sadly, "We haven't got Father, and shall not have him for a long time." She didn't say "perhaps never," but each silently added it, thinking of Father far away, where the fighting was.

firelight - Luz de fuego

darkened - oscurecido; oscurecer, obscurecer

silently - en silencio; silenciosamente

Nobody spoke for a minute; then Meg said in an altered tone, "You know the reason Mother proposed not having any presents this Christmas was because it is going to be a hard winter for everyone; and she thinks we ought not to spend money for pleasure, when our men are suffering so in the army.

altered - alterado; cambiar, modificar, alterar

tone - tono

proposed - propuesta; proponer, pedir la mano, pedir matrimonio

We can't do much, but we can make our little sacrifices, and ought to do it gladly. But I am afraid I don't," and Meg shook her head, as she thought regretfully of all the pretty things she wanted.

sacrifices - sacrificios; sacrificar, sacrificio

gladly - con gusto; de buena gana

regretfully - lamentablemente

"But I don't think the little we should spend would do any good. We've each got a dollar, and the army wouldn't be much helped by our giving that. I agree not to expect anything from Mother or you, but I do want to buy Undine and Sintran for myself. I've wanted it so long," said Jo, who was a bookworm.

Undine - ondina

bookworm - rata de biblioteca; ratón de biblioteca, tragalibros

"I planned to spend mine in new music," said Beth, with a little sigh, which no one heard but the hearth brush and kettle-holder.

sigh - suspiro; suspirar

hearth - hogar, lar, solera, fogón, crisol

kettle - pava; hervidor, tetera

holder - soporte, tenedor, titular, poseedor

"I shall get a nice box of Faber's drawing pencils; I really need them," said Amy decidedly.

Faber - Fabuloso

decidedly - decididamente; resueltamente

"Mother didn't say anything about our money, and she won't wish us to give up everything. Let's each buy what we want, and have a little fun; I'm sure we work hard enough to earn it," cried Jo, examining the heels of her shoes in a gentlemanly manner.

she won't - No lo hará

heels - tacones; talón

gentlemanly - caballeresco, caballeroso, galante

"I know I do"teaching those tiresome children nearly all day, when I'm longing to enjoy myself at home," began Meg, in the complaining tone again.

tiresome - cansino; fatigoso, cansador, agotador

"You don't have half such a hard time as I do," said Jo. "How would you like to be shut up for hours with a nervous, fussy old lady, who keeps you trotting, is never satisfied, and worries you till you're ready to fly out the window or cry?"

fussy - preocupado; puntilloso, quisquilloso, tiquismiquis, resabiado

trotting - al trote; (trot) al trote

satisfied - satisfecho; satisfacer

"It's naughty to fret, but I do think washing dishes and keeping things tidy is the worst work in the world. It makes me cross, and my hands get so stiff, I can't practice well at all." And Beth looked at her rough hands with a sigh that any one could hear that time.

naughty - pícaro; cachondo, travieso, maleducado, obsceno, picante

fret - traste; preocuparse

stiff - rígido, duro, tieso, inflexible

"I don't believe any of you suffer as I do," cried Amy, "for you don't have to go to school with impertinent girls, who plague you if you don't know your lessons, and laugh at your dresses, and label your father if he isn't rich, and insult you when your nose isn't nice."

impertinent - impertinente, maleducado

plague - plaga, peste, plagar, molestar, atormentar

insult - insultar, insulto, ofensa, improperio

"If you mean libel, I'd say so, and not talk about labels, as if Papa was a pickle bottle," advised Jo, laughing.

libel - libelo, calumnia, difamación

papa - papá

pickle - pepinillo; encurtido

"I know what I mean, and you needn't be statirical about it. It's proper to use good words, and improve your vocabilary," returned Amy, with dignity.

needn - necesita

statirical - Estatídico

vocabilary - Vocabilario

dignity - dignidad

"Don't peck at one another, children. Don't you wish we had the money Papa lost when we were little, Jo? Dear me! How happy and good we'd be, if we had no worries!" said Meg, who could remember better times.

peck - picotear

Dear me - !Vaya!

"You said the other day you thought we were a deal happier than the King children, for they were fighting and fretting all the time, in spite of their money."

fretting - inquietante; preocuparse

spite - rencor

"So I did, Beth. Well, I think we are. For though we do have to work, we make fun of ourselves, and are a pretty jolly set, as Jo would say."

jolly - alegre, divertido, gracioso

"Jo does use such slang words!" observed Amy, with a reproving look at the long figure stretched on the rug.

slang - argot, jerga

observed - observado; observar, seguir, tomar en cuenta

reproving - reprobando; (reprove) reprobando

stretched - estirado; estirar, estirarse, dar, extenderse, estirón

Jo immediately sat up, put her hands in her pockets, and began to whistle.

whistle - silbar; silbato, pito, chifle, pitido

"Don't, Jo. It's so boyish!"

"That's why I do it."

"I detest rude, unladylike girls!"

detest - detestar

unladylike - poco femenina

"I hate affected, niminy-piminy chits!"

niminy - Nimio

chits - chits; nota

"Birds in their little nests agree," sang Beth, the peacemaker, with such a funny face that both sharp voices softened to a laugh, and the "pecking" ended for that time.

nests - nidos; nido

peacemaker - pacificador, pacificadora

softened - suavizado; ablandar, suavizar

pecking - Picoteando; (pec) Picoteando

"Really, girls, you are both to be blamed," said Meg, beginning to lecture in her elder-sisterly fashion. "You are old enough to leave off boyish tricks, and to behave better, Josephine. It didn't matter so much when you were a little girl, but now you are so tall, and turn up your hair, you should remember that you are a young lady."

blamed - culpado; culpar, responsabilizar, echar la culpa

sisterly - hermana; sororal

"I'm not! And if turning up my hair makes me one, I'll wear it in two tails till I'm twenty," cried Jo, pulling off her net, and shaking down a chestnut mane. "I hate to think I've got to grow up, and be Miss March, and wear long gowns, and look as prim as a China Aster!

chestnut - castana; castana, castano, marrón

mane - cabello; crin, melena

prim - formal, remilgado

Aster - aster, áster

It's bad enough to be a girl, anyway, when I like boy's games and work and manners! I can't get over my disappointment in not being a boy. And it's worse than ever now, for I'm dying to go and fight with Papa. And I can only stay home and knit, like a poky old woman!"

disappointment - decepción, desilusión, chasco

I'm dying - Me estoy muriendo

knit - hacer punto, tricotar, tejer, soldarse, construir, elaborar

And Jo shook the blue army sock till the needles rattled like castanets, and her ball bounded across the room.

rattled - molesto; hacer sonar, hacer vibrar

castanets - castanuelas; castanuela

bounded - atado

"Poor Jo! It's too bad, but It can't be helped. So you must try to be contented with making your name boyish, and playing brother to us girls," said Beth, stroking the rough head with a hand that all the dish washing and dusting in the world could not make ungentle in its touch.

It can't be helped - No se puede evitar

contented with - contento con

stroking - Acariciar; (stroke) Acariciar

ungentle - desagradable

"As for you, Amy," continued Meg, "you are altogether too particular and prim. Your airs are funny now, but you'll grow up an affected little goose, if you don't take care. I like your nice manners and refined ways of speaking, when you don't try to be elegant. But your absurd words are as bad as Jo's slang."

altogether - todos juntos; totalmente, completamente, en general, en suma

goose - ganso

refined - refinado; refinar, perfeccionar

elegant - elegante, chic

absurd - absurdo, absurdo

"If Jo is a tomboy and Amy a goose, what am I, please?" asked Beth, ready to share the lecture.

tomboy - marimacha, marimacho, machorra, chicazo

"You're a dear, and nothing else," answered Meg warmly, and no one contradicted her, for the ˜Mouse'was the pet of the family.

warmly - calurosamente

contradicted - ontradicho; contradecir, contrariar

As young readers like to know ˜how people look', we will take this moment to give them a little sketch of the four sisters, who sat knitting away in the twilight, while the December snow fell quietly without, and the fire crackled cheerfully within.

sketch - boceto; bosquejar, esbozar, pergenar, esbozo, bosquejo

knitting - tejer; punto, labor de punto; (knit); hacer punto, tricotar

twilight - crepúsculo, penumbra

crackled - crepitó; crujido, chisporroteo, crepitar

cheerfully - con alegría

It was a comfortable room, though the carpet was faded and the furniture very plain, for a good picture or two hung on the walls, books filled the recesses, chrysanthemums and Christmas roses bloomed in the windows, and a pleasant atmosphere of home peace pervaded it.

faded - desvanecido; apagarse, debilitarse; destenir

plain - plano; sencillo; liso; sin ornamentos; llano (persona)

recesses - recesos; receso

chrysanthemums - crisantemos; crisantemo

roses - rosas; Rosa

bloomed - floreció; flor

pervaded - mpregnado; permear

Margaret, the eldest of the four, was sixteen, and very pretty, being plump and fair, with large eyes, plenty of soft brown hair, a sweet mouth, and white hands, of which she was rather vain. Fifteen-year-old Jo was very tall, thin, and brown, and reminded one of a colt, for she never seemed to know what to do with her long limbs, which were very much in her way. She had a decided mouth, a comical nose, and sharp, gray eyes, which appeared to see everything, and were by turns fierce, funny, or thoughtful. Her long, thick hair was her one beauty, but it was usually bundled into a net, to be out of her way. Round shoulders had Jo, big hands and feet, a flyaway look to her clothes, and the uncomfortable appearance of a girl who was rapidly shooting up into a woman and didn't like it.

plump - relleno, regordete, rechoncho

vain - vanidoso, vano, vacuo

Colt - potranco, potro

limbs - miembros; miembro

comical - cómico

Gray - Gris

fierce - fiero, feroz, enconado

thoughtful - pensativo; detallista, minucioso, meticuloso, cortés

bundled - en paquetes; haz, atado, fajo, atar, liar

flyaway - volante

rapidly - rápidamente

Elizabeth, or Beth, as everyone called her, was a rosy, smooth-haired, bright-eyed girl of thirteen, with a shy manner, a timid voice, and a peaceful expression which was seldom disturbed. Her father called her ˜Little Miss Tranquility', and the name suited her excellently, for she seemed to live in a happy world of her own, only venturing out to meet the few whom she trusted and loved. Amy, though the youngest, was a most important person, in her own opinion at least. A regular snow maiden, with blue eyes, and yellow hair curling on her shoulders, pale and slender, and always carrying herself like a young lady mindful of her manners. What the characters of the four sisters were we will leave to be found out.

Elizabeth - Isabel

rosy - Rosa

haired - Pelo

timid - tímido

seldom - raramente, rara vez

disturbed - molesto; perturbar, molestar

tranquility - tranquilidad

excellently - excelentemente

venturing out - Aventurarse, salir, marcharse

trusted - de confianza; confianza, crédito, fiar, consorcio, trust

maiden - doncella

slender - esbelto

mindful - conciencia; consciente

The clock struck six and, having swept up the hearth, Beth put a pair of slippers down to warm. Somehow the sight of the old shoes had a good effect upon the girls, for Mother was coming, and everyone brightened to welcome her. Meg stopped lecturing, and lighted the lamp, Amy got out of the easy chair without being asked, and Jo forgot how tired she was as she sat up to hold the slippers nearer to the blaze.

struck - golpeado; tachar, borrar, golpear, pegar, acunar

swept - barrido; barrer, peinar

slippers - zapatillas; zapatilla, pantufla, babucha

somehow - de algún modo, de alguna manera, de alguna forma

blaze - arde; llamarada, incendio; resplandor

"They are quite worn out. Marmee must have a new pair."

"I thought I'd get her some with my dollar," said Beth.

"No, I shall!" cried Amy.

"I'm the oldest," began Meg, but Jo cut in with a decided, "I'm the man of the family now Papa is away, and I shall provide the slippers, for he told me to take special care of Mother while he was gone."

"I'll tell you what we'll do," said Beth, "let's each get her something for Christmas, and not get anything for ourselves."

"That's like you, dear! What will we get?" exclaimed Jo.

exclaimed - exclamó; exclamar

Everyone thought soberly for a minute, then Meg announced, as if the idea was suggested by the sight of her own pretty hands, "I shall give her a nice pair of gloves."

soberly - sobriamente

"Army shoes, best to be had," cried Jo.

"Some handkerchiefs, all hemmed," said Beth.

handkerchiefs - panuelos; panuelo

hemmed - con dobladillo; dobladillo

"I'll get a little bottle of cologne. She likes it, and it won't cost much, so I'll have some left to buy my pencils," added Amy.

Cologne - Colonia

"How will we give the things?" asked Meg.

"Put them on the table, and bring her in and see her open the bundles. Don't you remember how we used to do on our birthdays?" answered Jo.

bundles - paquetes; haz, atado, fajo, atar, liar

"I used to be so frightened when it was my turn to sit in the chair with the crown on, and see you all come marching round to give the presents, with a kiss. I liked the things and the kisses, but it was dreadful to have you sit looking at me while I opened the bundles," said Beth, who was toasting her face and the bread for tea at the same time.

crown - corona

"Let Marmee think we are getting things for ourselves, and then surprise her. We must go shopping tomorrow afternoon, Meg. There is so much to do about the play for Christmas night," said Jo, marching up and down, with her hands behind her back, and her nose in the air.

"I don't mean to act any more after this time. I'm getting too old for such things," observed Meg, who was as much a child as ever about ˜dressing-up'frolics.

frolics - etozos; juguetear, retozar, jugueteo

"You won't stop, I know, as long as you can trail round in a white gown with your hair down, and wear gold-paper jewelry. You are the best actress we've got, and there'll be an end of everything if you quit the boards," said Jo. "We ought to rehearse tonight. Come here, Amy, and do the fainting scene, for you are as stiff as a poker in that."

trail - seguir, arrastrar, rastro, pista, sendero

jewelry - joyas

rehearse - repetir, contar, practicar, ensayar

Fainting - desmayos; desmayo; (faint) desmayos; desmayo

poker - póquer

"I can't help it. I never saw anyone faint, and I don't choose to make myself all black and blue, tumbling flat as you do. If I can go down easily, I'll drop. If I can't, I shall fall into a chair and be graceful. I don't care if Hugo does come at me with a pistol," returned Amy, who was not gifted with dramatic power, but was chosen because she was small enough to be borne out shrieking by the villain of the piece.

I can't help it - No puedo evitarlo

faint - desmayarse; débil, tenue

tumbling - Dar volteretas; (tumble); caída, caer, revolverse

graceful - gracia; grácil, gracioso

pistol - pistola

dramatic - dramático, asombroso

shrieking - Gritos; (shriek); alarido, chillido, chillar

villain - villano

"Do it this way. Clasp your hands so, and stagger across the room, crying frantically, ˜Roderigo! Save me! Save me!'" and away went Jo, with a melodramatic scream which was truly thrilling.

clasp - cierre; broche, manija, corchete, hebilla, agarrar

stagger - trastabillar; tambalearse; (stag); ciervo, potro, potra

melodramatic - melodramático

scream - grito, gritar

truly - de verdad; verdaderamente, realmente

thrilling - emocionante; excitar; emocionar, conmover

Amy followed, but she poked her hands out stiffly before her, and jerked herself along as if she went by machinery, and her "Ow!" was more suggestive of pins being run into her than of fear and anguish. Jo gave a despairing groan, and Meg laughed outright, while Beth let her bread burn as she watched the fun with interest. "It's no use! Do the best you can when the time comes, and if the audience laughs, don't blame me. Come on, Meg."

poked - pinchado; meter

jerked - sacudido; sacudida

machinery - máquinas, maquinaria, checkmecánica

suggestive - sugerente; sugestivo

anguish - angustia

despairing - desesperado; desesperar, desesperanzar, desesperación

groan - gimoteo; gemido, grunido, gemir, grunir

outright - en serio; por completo, de plano, abiertamente, inmediatamente

It's no use - Es inútil

blame - culpar, responsabilizar, echar la culpa

Then things went smoothly, for Don Pedro defied the world in a speech of two pages without a single break. Hagar, the witch, chanted an awful incantation over her kettleful of simmering toads, with weird effect. Roderigo rent his chains asunder manfully, and Hugo died in agonies of remorse and arsenic, with a wild, "Ha! Ha!"

smoothly - sin problemas; suavemente

defied - desafiado; desafiar, desobedecer, renunciar

witch - bruja

chanted - cantado; salmodiar

simmering - hervir a fuego lento

toads - sapos; sapo, sapa

weird - raro

asunder - despedazar; en dos, en pedazos

manfully - con valentía

agonies - agonías; agonía, angustia

remorse - remordimientos; remordimiento, compunción

arsenic - arsénico, trióxido de arsénico

"It's the best we've had yet," said Meg, as the dead villain sat up and rubbed his elbows.

rubbed - frotado; frotación, frotamiento, frote, frotar

elbows - codos; codo, codazo, panish: t-needed

"I don't see how you can write and act such splendid things, Jo. You're a regular Shakespeare!" exclaimed Beth, who firmly believed that her sisters were gifted with wonderful genius in all things.

splendid - espléndido

Shakespeare - Shakespeare

firmly - con firmeza; firmemente

genius - genio, genia

"Not quite," replied Jo modestly. "I do think The Witches Curse, an Operatic Tragedy is rather a nice thing, but I'd like to try Macbeth, if we only had a trapdoor for Banquo. I always wanted to do the killing part. ˜Is that a dagger that I see before me?" muttered Jo, rolling her eyes and clutching at the air, as she had seen a famous tragedian do.

modestly - con modestia; modestamente

witches - brujas; bruja

curse - maldición; maldecir

operatic - ópera; operístico

tragedy - tragedia

trapdoor - trampa, escotillón

dagger - daga, punal

muttered - murmuró; hablar entre dientes, murmurar

clutching - agarrando; agarrar

tragedian - tragedia; tragediógrafo

"No, it's the toasting fork, with Mother's shoe on it instead of the bread. Beth's stage-struck!" cried Meg, and the rehearsal ended in a general burst of laughter.

rehearsal - ensayo

burst - reventar, romper, ráfaga, estallo, reventón

"Glad to find you so merry, my girls," said a cheery voice at the door, and actors and audience turned to welcome a tall, motherly lady with a ˜can I help you'look about her which was truly delightful. She was not elegantly dressed, but a noble-looking woman, and the girls thought the gray cloak and unfashionable bonnet covered the most splendid mother in the world.

merry - contento; alegre

cheery - Alegre

delightful - delicioso

elegantly - con elegancia; elegantemente

noble - noble

cloak - capa, embozo, velo, capa, embozar

bonnet - capucha, gorra, cofia, capota, capó

most splendid - el más espléndido

"Well, dearies, how have you got on today? There was so much to do, getting the boxes ready to go tomorrow, that I didn't come home to dinner. Has anyone called, Beth? How is your cold, Meg? Jo, you look tired to death. Come and kiss me, baby."

dearies - Carino

tired to death - Muerto de cansancio

While making these maternal inquiries Mrs. March got her wet things off, her warm slippers on, and sitting down in the easy chair, drew Amy to her lap, preparing to enjoy the happiest hour of her busy day. The girls flew about, trying to make things comfortable, each in her own way. Meg arranged the tea table, Jo brought wood and set chairs, dropping, over-turning, and clattering everything she touched.

maternal - maternal, materno

inquiries - consultas; inquisición, indagatoria, pesquisa

lap - vuelta; lamer

clattering - ruidos; trapalear

Beth trotted to and fro between parlor kitchen, quiet and busy, while Amy gave directions to everyone, as she sat with her hands folded.

trotted - trotó; trotar

parlor - salón; sala, sala de estar

As they gathered about the table, Mrs. March said, with a particularly happy face, "I've got a treat for you after supper."

supper - cenar; cena

A quick, bright smile went round like a streak of sunshine. Beth clapped her hands, regardless of the biscuit she held, and Jo tossed up her napkin, crying, "A letter! A letter! Three cheers for Father!"

streak - raya, trazo, sarta, racha, ristra

sunshine - sol, luz del sol

clapped - aplaudió; aplaudir

regardless - a pesar de todo; en cualquier caso

tossed - lanzado; tiro, lanzamiento, lanzar una moneda al aire

napkin - servilleta

Cheers - salud, nos vemos, gracias; (cheer); salud, nos vemos, gracias

"Yes, a nice long letter. He is well, and thinks he shall get through the cold season better than we feared. He sends all sorts of loving wishes for Christmas, and an especial message to you girls," said Mrs. March, patting her pocket as if she had got a treasure there.

especial - especial

patting - palmaditas; palmadita, caricia

treasure - tesoro, atesorar

"Hurry and get done! Don't stop to quirk your little finger and simper over your plate, Amy," cried Jo, choking on her tea and dropping her bread, butter side down, on the carpet in her haste to get at the treat.

quirk - extravagancia; idiosincrasia, manía, peculiaridad

simper - sonreírse afectadamente, sonrisa afectada (lit, affected smile)

choking - ahogar, asfixiar

haste - prisa, premura

Beth ate no more, but crept away to sit in her shadowy corner and brood over the delight to come, till the others were ready.

crept - se arrastró; reptar, hormigueo, fatiga

shadowy - sombra; sombroso, sombreado, sombrío, umbroso

brood - cría, polluelo, prole, empollar, proteger

delight - disfrutar; deleite, regocijo, delicia, placer

"I think it was so splendid in Father to go as chaplain when he was too old to be drafted, and not strong enough for a soldier," said Meg warmly.

chaplain - capellán

drafted - redactado; corriente, corriente de aire, trago

"Don't I wish I could go as a drummer, a vivan"what's its name? Or a nurse, so I could be near him and help him," exclaimed Jo, with a groan.

drummer - Batería

"It must be very disagreeable to sleep in a tent, and eat all sorts of bad-tasting things, and drink out of a tin mug," sighed Amy.

disagreeable - desagradable

mug - taza; tazón

"When will he come home, Marmee?" asked Beth, with a little quiver in her voice.

quiver - tiemblo; estremecer(se)

"Not for many months, dear, unless he is sick. He will stay and do his work faithfully as long as he can, and we won't ask for him back a minute sooner than he can be spared. Now come and hear the letter."

faithfully - fielmente

be spared - ahorrarse

They all drew to the fire, Mother in the big chair with Beth at her feet, Meg and Amy perched on either arm of the chair, and Jo leaning on the back, where no one would see any sign of emotion if the letter should happen to be touching. Very few letters were written in those hard times that were not touching, especially those which fathers sent home.

perched - posado; percha

leaning - Inclinado; (lean) Inclinado

In this one little was said of the hardships endured, the dangers faced, or the homesickness conquered. It was a cheerful, hopeful letter, full of lively descriptions of camp life, marches, and military news, and only at the end did the writer's heart over-flow with fatherly love and longing for the little girls at home.

hardships - dificultades; sufrimientos, apuro, penalidades

endured - oportado; aguantar, perdurar, tolerar, consentir, condescender

homesickness - nostalgia, anoranza, morrina

conquered - conquistado; conquistar, debelar

hopeful - esperanzado, esperanzador

lively - animado

military - militar, ejército

"Give them all of my dear love and a kiss. Tell them I think of them by day, pray for them by night, and find my best comfort in their affection at all times. A year seems very long to wait before I see them, but remind them that while we wait we may all work, so that these hard days need not be wasted. I know they will remember all I said to them, that they will be loving children to you, will do their duty faithfully, fight their bosom enemies bravely, and conquer themselves so beautifully that when I come back to them I may be fonder and prouder than ever of my little women.

comfort - comodidad, consuelo, confortar

affection - afecto, carino, apego

bosom - seno, pechera, busto

bravely - con valentía; valientemente

conquer - conquistar, debelar

beautifully - bonito; bellamente

fonder - con más carino; carinoso, afectuoso

Everybody sniffed when they came to that part. Jo wasn't ashamed of the great tear that dropped off the end of her nose, and Amy never minded the rumpling of her curls as she hid her face on her mother's shoulder and sobbed out, "I am a selfish girl! But I'll truly try to be better, so he mayn't be disappointed in me by-and-by."

sniffed - olfateado; olfatear, esnifar, husmear, checksorber

wasn - Era

ashamed - avergonzado, abochornado, apenado

curls - rizos; rizo, bucle, flexión

sobbed - sollozó; hdp

Selfish - egoísta

mayn - No

"We all will," cried Meg. "I think too much of my looks and hate to work, but won't any more, if I can help it."

"I'll try and be what he loves to call me, ˜a little woman'and not be rough and wild, but do my duty here instead of wanting to be somewhere else," said Jo, thinking that keeping her temper at home was a much harder task than facing a rebel or two down South.

temper - temperamento, temple, templar, temperar

rebel - rebelde

Beth said nothing, but wiped away her tears with the blue army sock and began to knit with all her might, losing no time in doing the duty that lay nearest her, while she resolved in her quiet little soul to be all that Father hoped to find her when the year brought round the happy coming home.

wiped - borrada; limpiar

resolved - resuelto; tomar la decisión de, resolver

soul - alma, espíritu

Mrs. March broke the silence that followed Jo's words, by saying in her cheery voice, "Do you remember how you used to play Pilgrims Progress when you were little things? Nothing delighted you more than to have me tie my piece bags on your backs for burdens, give you hats and sticks and rolls of paper, and let you travel through the house from the cellar, which was the City of Destruction, up, up, to the housetop, where you had all the lovely things you could collect to make a Celestial City.

silence - silencio, silenciar, hacer callar

delighted - encantado; deleite, regocijo, delicia, placer

burdens - argas; carga

cellar - sótano, bodega

destruction - destrucción, destrucción

housetop - Cubierta

celestial - celestial, celeste

"What fun it was, especially going by the lions, fighting Apollyon, and passing through the valley where the hob-goblins were," said Jo.

hob - encimera, repisa

goblins - duendes; duende, trasgo

"I liked the place where the bundles fell off and tumbled downstairs," said Meg.

tumbled - tumbado; caída, caer, revolverse

"I don't remember much about it, except that I was afraid of the cellar and the dark entry, and always liked the cake and milk we had up at the top. If I wasn't too old for such things, I'd rather like to play it over again," said Amy, who began to talk of renouncing childish things at the mature age of twelve.

renouncing - renunciar (a)

childish - para ninos, infantil, infantiloide, pueril

mature - maduro

"We never are too old for this, my dear, because it is a play we are playing all the time in one way or another. Our burdens are here, our road is before us, and the longing for goodness and happiness is the guide that leads us through many troubles and mistakes to the peace which is a true Celestial City.

goodness - bondad

Now, my little pilgrims, suppose you begin again, not in play, but in earnest, and see how far on you can get before Father comes home."

"Really, Mother? Where are our bundles?" asked Amy, who was a very literal young lady.

literal - literal

"Each of you told what your burden was just now, except Beth. I rather think she hasn't got any," said her mother.

burden - carga

"Yes, I have. Mine is dishes and dusters, and envying girls with nice pianos, and being afraid of people."

dusters - polvos; plumero

envying - envidiando; envidia, pelusa, envidiar

Beth's bundle was such a funny one that everybody wanted to laugh, but nobody did, for it would have hurt her feelings very much.

bundle - haz, atado, fajo, atar, liar

feelings - Sentimientos

"Let us do it," said Meg thoughtfully. "It is only another name for trying to be good, and the story may help us, for though we do want to be good, it's hard work and we forget, and don't do our best."

thoughtfully - Pensadamente

"We were in the Slough of Despond tonight, and Mother came and pulled us out as Help did in the book. We ought to have our roll of directions, like Christian. What shall we do about that?" asked Jo, delighted with the fancy which lent a little romance to the very dull task of doing her duty.

slough - lodos

Christian - cristiano, cristiana, Cristián

romance - romance

dull - sordo; romo, desafilado, embotado, aburrido, soso

"Look under your pillows Christmas morning, and you will find your guidebook," replied Mrs. March.

pillows - almohadas; almohada

guidebook - Guía

At nine they stopped work, and sang, as usual, before they went to bed. No one but Beth could get much music out of the old piano, but she had a way of softly touching the yellow keys and making a pleasant accompaniment to the simple songs they sang. Meg had a voice like a flute, and she and her mother led the little choir.

softly - suavemente, inaudiblemente, silenciosamente

accompaniment - acompanamiento; acompanamiento

flute - flauta

choir - coro

Amy chirped like a cricket, and Jo wandered through the airs at her own sweet will, always coming out at the wrong place with a croak or a quaver that spoiled the most pensive tune. They had always done this from the time they could lisp...

chirped - chirriaba; trino, chirrido, trinar, chirriar, grillar

cricket - críquet, cricket

wandered - deambuló; vagar, divagar, errar, deambular, enganar

croak - croar, palmar

quaver - corchea, temblor, temblar

spoiled - mimado; expoliar, despojar, danar, arruinar, echar a perder

pensive - pensativo, meditabundo, amohinado, melancólico

tune - melodía, tonada, afinar, sintonizar

lisp - ceceo, balbuceo, cecear, balbucear

Crinkle, crinkle, 'ittle 'tar,

ittle - Pequeno

tar - alquitrán, brea, chapapote

and it had become a household custom, for the mother was a born singer. The first sound in the morning was her voice as she went about the house singing like a lark, and the last sound at night was the same cheery sound, for the girls never grew too old for that familiar lullaby.

household - hogar, agregado familiar, núcleo familiar, familia, casero

lark - alondra

lullaby - canción de cuna, nana, canto de cuna, arrullo

CHAPTER TWO. A MERRY CHRISTMAS

Jo was the first to wake in the gray dawn of Christmas morning. No stockings hung at the fireplace, and for a moment she felt as much disappointed as she did long ago, when her little sock fell down because it was crammed so full of goodies. Then she remembered her mother's promise and, slipping her hand under her pillow, drew out a little crimson-covered book. She knew it very well, for it was that beautiful old story of the best life ever lived, and Jo felt that it was a true guidebook for any pilgrim going on a long journey.

dawn - amanecer, alba, amanecer, aurora, madrugada

stockings - medias; media

fireplace - chimenea, hogar

little sock - un calcetín pequeno

crammed - atiborrado; atestar, atiborrar, embutir, chancar

goodies - Bueno

slipping - resbalando; resbalar

pillow - almohada

crimson - carmín, carmesí

pilgrim - peregrino, colonista

She woke Meg with a "Merry Christmas," and bade her see what was under her pillow. A green-covered book appeared, with the same picture inside, and a few words written by their mother, which made their one present very precious in their eyes. Presently Beth and Amy woke to rummage and find their little books also, one dove-colored, the other blue, and all sat looking at and talking about them, while the east grew rosy with the coming day.

precious - preciosos; precioso

rummage - rebuscar; revolver

dove - paloma; (dive) paloma

In spite of her small vanities, Margaret had a sweet and pious nature, which unconsciously influenced her sisters, especially Jo, who loved her very tenderly, and obeyed her because her advice was so gently given.

vanities - vanidades; vanidad

pious - piadoso

unconsciously - inconscientemente

tenderly - con ternura; tiernamente

obeyed - obedecer

gently - suavemente; mansamente, suave

"Girls," said Meg seriously, looking from the tumbled head beside her to the two little night-capped ones in the room beyond, "Mother wants us to read and love and mind these books, and we must begin at once. We used to be faithful about it, but since Father went away and all this war trouble unsettled us, we have neglected many things.

beside - al lado de, cabe

beyond - más allá de

faithful - fieles; fiel, leal

unsettled - inquietos; perturbar, inquietar

neglected - desatendida; descuidar, negligir, desoír, hacer caso omiso

You can do as you please, but I shall keep my book on the table here and read a little every morning as soon as I wake, for I know it will do me good and help me through the day."

Then she opened her new book and began to read. Jo put her arm round her and, leaning cheek to cheek, read also, with the quiet expression so seldom seen on her restless face.

cheek - mejilla, cacha, cachete, nalga, glúteo, descoco

restless - inquieto

"How good Meg is! Come, Amy, let's do as they do. I'll help you with the hard words, and they'll explain things if we don't understand," whispered Beth, very much impressed by the pretty books and her sisters'example.

whispered - susurrado; susurro, rumor, rastro, susurrar

impressed - impresionado; impresionar, impresión, impresión

"I'm glad mine is blue," said Amy. and then the rooms were very still while the pages were softly turned, and the winter sunshine crept in to touch the bright heads and serious faces with a Christmas greeting.

crept in - Entrar a hurtadillas

"Where is Mother?" asked Meg, as she and Jo ran down to thank her for their gifts, half an hour later.

"Goodness only knows. Some poor creeter came a-beggin', and your ma went straight off to see what was needed. There never was such a woman for givin'away vittles and drink, clothes and firin'," replied Hannah, who had lived with the family since Meg was born, and was considered by them all more as a friend than a servant.

givin - dando

vittles - Pequeno

"She will be back soon, I think, so fry your cakes, and have everything ready," said Meg, looking over the presents which were collected in a basket and kept under the sofa, ready to be produced at the proper time. "Why, where is Amy's bottle of cologne?" she added, as the little flask did not appear.

basket - cesta, cesto, canasta

sofa - sofá, sillón

flask - frasco; petaca, licorera disfrazado

"She took it out a minute ago, and went off with it to put a ribbon on it, or some such notion," replied Jo, dancing about the room to take the first stiffness off the new army slippers.

ribbon - cinta, mono, lazo, galón

notion - noción, ganas, intención

stiffness - rigidez, inflexibilidad, agujetas

"How nice my handkerchiefs look, don't they? Hannah washed and ironed them for me, and I marked them all myself," said Beth, looking proudly at the somewhat uneven letters which had cost her such labor.

proudly - orgulloso; fieramente, orgullosamente

somewhat - algo, un poco, de algún modo, de alguna manera

uneven - desigual, desnivel, desnivelado, desuniforme, despatronizado

labor - trabajo

"Bless the child! She's gone and put ˜Mother'on them instead of ˜M. March'. How funny!" cried Jo, taking one up.

bless - bendecir

"Isn't that right? I thought it was better to do it so, because Meg's initials are M.M., and I don't want anyone to use these but Marmee," said Beth, looking troubled.

initials - las iniciales; inicial, iniciales

"It's all right, dear, and a very pretty idea, quite sensible too, for no one can ever mistake now. It will please her very much, I know," said Meg, with a frown for Jo and a smile for Beth.

frown - fruncir el ceno

"There's Mother. Hide the basket, quick!" cried Jo, as a door slammed and steps sounded in the hall.

slammed - golpeado; cerrar de golpe

Amy came in hastily, and looked rather abashed when she saw her sisters all waiting for her.

hastily - apresuradamente; de prisa, atropelladamente

abashed - avergonzado; confundir, avergonzar, abochornar

"Where have you been, and what are you hiding behind you?" asked Meg, surprised to see, by her hood and cloak, that lazy Amy had been out so early.

hood - capucha

"Don't laugh at me, Jo! I didn't mean anyone should know till the time came. I only meant to change the little bottle for a big one, and I gave all my money to get it, and I'm truly trying not to be selfish any more."

As she spoke, Amy showed the handsome flask which replaced the cheap one, and looked so earnest and humble in her little effort to forget herself that Meg hugged her on the spot, and Jo pronounced her ˜a trump', while Beth ran to the window, and picked her finest rose to ornament the stately bottle.

handsome - apuesto, guapo, de buen parecer, lindo

humble - humilde

hugged - abrazado; abrazo, abrazar

trump - triunfo

ornament - ornamento, ornamento musical

stately - enorial; majestuoso

"You see I felt ashamed of my present, after reading and talking about being good this morning, so I ran round the corner and changed it the minute I was up, and I'm so glad, for mine is the handsomest now."

felt ashamed - sentirse avergonzado

handsomest - el más guapo; apuesto, guapo, de buen parecer, lindo

Another bang of the street door sent the basket under the sofa, and the girls to the table, eager for breakfast.

bang - portazo, golpe estrepitoso

eager - ávido, ansioso, deseoso

"Merry Christmas, Marmee! Many of them! Thank you for our books. We read some, and mean to every day," they all cried in chorus.

chorus - coro, estribillo, corear

"Merry Christmas, little daughters! I'm glad you began at once, and hope you will keep on. But I want to say one word before we sit down. Not far away from here lies a poor woman with a little newborn baby. Six children are huddled into one bed to keep from freezing, for they have no fire.

poor woman - Pobre mujer

newborn - recién nacido, neonato

huddled - acurrucados; chusma, amontonarse, acurrucarse

There is nothing to eat over there, and the oldest boy came to tell me they were suffering hunger and cold. My girls, will you give them your breakfast as a Christmas present?"

hunger - hambre

Christmas present - Regalo de Navidad

They were all unusually hungry, having waited nearly an hour, and for a minute no one spoke, only a minute, for Jo exclaimed impetuously, "I'm so glad you came before we began!"

impetuously - impetuosamente

"May I go and help carry the things to the poor little children?" asked Beth eagerly.

eagerly - con ganas; ansiosamente

"I shall take the cream and the muffings," added Amy, heroically giving up the article she most liked.

heroically - heroicamente

Meg was already covering the buckwheats, and piling the bread into one big plate.

buckwheats - alforfón, trigo sarraceno

"I thought you'd do it," said Mrs. March, smiling as if satisfied. "You shall all go and help me, and when we come back we will have bread and milk for breakfast, and make it up at dinnertime."

dinnertime - A la hora de cenar

They were soon ready, and the procession set out. Fortunately it was early, and they went through back streets, so few people saw them, and no one laughed at the queer party.

procession - procesión

queer - raro, extrano, trucha, marica, maricón

A poor, bare, miserable room it was, with broken windows, no fire, ragged bedclothes, a sick mother, wailing baby, and a group of pale, hungry children cuddled under one old quilt, trying to keep warm.

bare - desnudo, descubierto

miserable - miserable

ragged - Desgarrado; (rag) Desgarrado

bedclothes - ropa de cama

wailing - aullidos; (wail) aullidos

cuddled - abrazado; abrazo, mimo, abrazar, hacer arrumacos, mecer

quilt - colcha, edredón, acolchar

How the big eyes stared and the blue lips smiled as the girls went in.

"Ach, mein Gott! It is good angels come to us!" said the poor woman, crying for joy.

angels - ángeles; ángel

joy - alegría, júbilo

"Funny angels in hoods and mittens," said Jo, and set them to laughing.

hoods - capuchas; capucha

mittens - guantes; manopla, mitón

In a few minutes it really did seem as if kind spirits had been at work there. Hannah, who had carried wood, made a fire, and stopped up the broken panes with old hats and her own cloak. Mrs. March gave the mother tea and gruel, and comforted her with promises of help, while she dressed the little baby as tenderly as if it had been her own.

stopped up - frenar; tapar; acostarse tarde

panes - paneles; cristal, vidrio

gruel - Gachas

comforted - confortado; comodidad, consuelo, confortar

The girls meantime spread the table, set the children round the fire, and fed them like so many hungry birds, laughing, talking, and trying to understand the funny broken English.

meantime - mientras tanto; entretanto, en tanto

"Das ist gut!" "Die Engel-kinder!" cried the poor things as they ate and warmed their purple hands at the comfortable blaze. The girls had never been called angel children before, and thought it very agreeable, especially Jo, who had been considered a ˜Sancho'ever since she was born. That was a very happy breakfast, though they didn't get any of it.

Gut - tripa, panza, maría, destripar

angel - ángel

agreeable - lisonjero, agradable, dispuesto, conforme

And when they went away, leaving comfort behind, I think there were not in all the city four merrier people than the hungry little girls who gave away their breakfasts and contented themselves with bread and milk on Christmas morning.

merrier - mejor; alegre

contented - contento; satisfecho

"That's loving our neighbor better than ourselves, and I like it," said Meg, as they set out their presents while their mother was upstairs collecting clothes for the poor Hummels.

Not a very splendid show, but there was a great deal of love done up in the few little bundles, and the tall vase of red roses, white chrysanthemums, and trailing vines, which stood in the middle, gave quite an elegant air to the table.

done up - abrochar, renovar, decorar, envolver

vase - un jarrón; jarrón, florero, vasija

trailing - recorriendo; seguir, arrastrar, rastro, pista, sendero

vines - enredaderas; vid, trepadora, enredadera

"She's coming! Strike up, Beth! Open the door, Amy! Three cheers for Marmee!" cried Jo, prancing about while Meg went to conduct Mother to the seat of honor.

strike - tachar, borrar, golpear, pegar, acunar, hacer la huelga

prancing about - dar brincos, saltar alegremente

conduct - conducción, conducta, guiar, dirigir, manejar, conducir

honor - honor, privilegio, honrar, ajustarse, acatar, respetar

Beth played her gayest march, Amy threw open the door, and Meg enacted escort with great dignity. Mrs.

gayest - más gay; gay, homosexual

enacted - romulgado; promulgar, interpretar, hacer efecto, actuar

escort - acompanante; escolta, acompanante, escoltar

March was both surprised and touched, and smiled with her eyes full as she examined her presents and read the little notes which accompanied them. The slippers went on at once, a new handkerchief was slipped into her pocket, well scented with Amy's cologne, the rose was fastened in her bosom, and the nice gloves were pronounced a perfect fit.

accompanied - acompanado; acompanar

handkerchief - panuelo; panuelo

slipped - se resbaló; resbalar

scented - con aroma; olor, esencia, olfato, fragancia, oler

There was a good deal of laughing and kissing and explaining, in the simple, loving fashion which makes these home festivals so pleasant at the time, so sweet to remember long afterward, and then all fell to work.

afterward - después

The morning charities and ceremonies took so much time that the rest of the day was devoted to preparations for the evening festivities. Being still too young to go often to the theater, and not rich enough to afford any great outlay for private performances, the girls put their wits to work, and necessity being the mother of invention, made whatever they needed. Very clever were some of their productions, pasteboard guitars, antique lamps made of old-fashioned butter boats covered with silver paper, gorgeous robes of old cotton, glittering with tin spangles from a pickle factory, and armor covered with the same useful diamond shaped bits left in sheets when the lids of preserve pots were cut out.

devoted - dedicado; dedicar

preparations - preparativos; preparación

festivities - festejos; festividad

theater - teatro, zona

outlay - gastos; gasto, gastar

wits - agudeza, ingenio, chispa, gracia

necessity - necesidad, menester

antique - antigüedades; antiguo, antigüedad

silver paper - papel aluminio

gorgeous - guapa; guapísimo

robes - togas; bata, hábito, toga

glittering - resplandeciente; chispeante; (glitter); brillo, purpurina

spangles - llantitas; lentejuela

armor - armadura, blindaje, coraza, blindado

lids - tapas; tapa

preserve - mermelada, reserva, reserva natural, coto, terreno, dominio

The big chamber was the scene of many innocent revels.

chamber - cámara, recámara, compartimento

revels - juergas; deleitarse

No gentleman were admitted, so Jo played male parts to her heart's content and took immense satisfaction in a pair of russet leather boots given her by a friend, who knew a lady who knew an actor. These boots, an old foil, and a slashed doublet once used by an artist for some picture, were Jo's chief treasures and appeared on all occasions.

content - contenido; satisfecho

immense - inmenso

satisfaction - satisfacción, satisfacción

russet - ocre, marrojizo, marrojiza, color teja

foil - papel; frustrar

slashed - rajado; dar un tajo, rajar

doublet - Doblete

chief - jefe, principal

treasures - tesoros; tesoro, atesorar

The smallness of the company made it necessary for the two principal actors to take several parts apiece, and they certainly deserved some credit for the hard work they did in learning three or four different parts, whisking in and out of various costumes, and managing the stage besides. It was excellent drill for their memories, a harmless amusement, and employed many hours which otherwise would have been idle, lonely, or spent in less profitable society.

smallness - pequenez; pequenez, menudencia

principal - principal, capital, director, directora, principal de escuela

apiece - cada uno

deserved - merecido; merecer, meritar

whisking - batiendo; llevar rápidamente

besides - además; al lado de, cabe

drill - taladro; taladrar, perforar

harmless - inocuo, inofensivo

amusement - divertimiento, esparcimiento, diversión

otherwise - o no; de otro

idle - ocioso; parado, inactivo

profitable - rentable, provechoso, lucrativo, ventajoso

On Christmas night, a dozen girls piled onto the bed which was the dress circle, and sat before the blue and yellow chintz curtains in a most flattering state of expectancy. There was a good deal of rustling and whispering behind the curtain, a trifle of lamp smoke, and an occasional giggle from Amy, who was apt to get hysterical in the excitement of the moment.

dozen - docena, decenas

piled - apilado; montón, pila

flattering - palanqueador; halagar, adular

rustling - usurro; (rustle); crujido

trifle - baratija; sopa inglesa, pizca, nadería, nimiedad, zarandaja

occasional - ocasional, esporádico

giggle - risa; reír

apt - apto; susceptible de, propenso a

Presently a bell sounded, the curtains flew apart, and the operatic tragedy began.

"A gloomy wood," according to the one playbill, was represented by a few shrubs in pots, green baize on the floor, and a cave in the distance. This cave was made with a clothes horse for a roof, bureaus for walls, and in it was a small furnace in full blast, with a black pot on it and an old witch bending over it. The stage was dark and the glow of the furnace had a fine effect, especially as real steam issued from the kettle when the witch took off the cover. A moment was allowed for the first thrill to subside, then Hugo, the villain, stalked in with a clanking sword at his side, a slouching hat, black beard, mysterious cloak, and the boots.

gloomy - lúgubre; lóbrego, sombrío

playbill - Programa

shrubs - arbustos; arbusto

baize - tapete, bayeta

cave - cueva, caverna

bureaus - ficinas; oficina, escritorio, cómoda

furnace - horno, caldera, calefacción

blast - ráfaga

old witch - bruja (vieja)

glow - resplandor; fulgir, fulgurar, iluminar, brillar

steam - Vapor; vaporear; de vapor; al vapor

thrill - emoción; excitar; emocionar, conmover

subside - disminuir; calmarse

stalked - acosado; tallo

clanking - Tocando; (clank) Tocando

sword - espada, gladio

beard - barba, jotera, pantalla, barbar, provocar, mortificar

mysterious - misterioso

After pacing to and fro in much agitation, he struck his forehead, and burst out in a wild strain, singing of his hatred for Roderigo, his love for Zara, and his pleasing resolution to kill the one and win the other. The gruff tones of Hugo's voice, with an occasional shout when his feelings overcame him, were very impressive, and the audience applauded the moment he paused for breath. Bowing with the air of one accustomed to public praise, he stole to the cavern and ordered Hagar to come forth with a commanding, "What ho, minion! I need thee!"

pacing - itmo; paso

agitation - agitación, desasosiego, inquietud

forehead - la frente; frente

strain - tensión; estirar, tensar

hatred - odio

resolution - resolución, panish: t-needed

gruff - grunón; ronco

tones - tonos; tono

overcame - uperado; vencer, superar

applauded - aplaudido; aplaudir

paused - receso, checkdescanso, pausar, interrumpir, suspender

bowing - Inclinarse; (bow) Inclinarse

accustomed - acostumbrado; acostumbrarse, habituar

Praise - elogios; alabanza, loa, enaltecimiento, elogio, adoración

cavern - caverna

forth - adelante

commanding - mandando; orden, mandato, mando, comando, dominio

Ho - Qué

minion - lacayo, súbdito, sirviente, subalterno, acólito

thee - tú; vos (en Espana)

Out came Meg, with gray horsehair hanging about her face, a red and black robe, a staff, and cabalistic signs upon her cloak. Hugo demanded a potion to make Zara adore him, and one to destroy Roderigo. Hagar, in a fine dramatic melody, promised both, and proceeded to call up the spirit who would bring the love philter.

hanging about - frecuentar, esperar, pasar el tiempo

robe - túnica; bata, hábito, toga

demanded - exigió; demanda, exigencia, exigir, demandar

potion - poción, brebaje, elixir, pócima

adore - adorar, querer

melody - melodía

proceeded - procedió; continuar, proceder

philter - filter; pócima, pócima de amor, poción de amor, filtro

Hither, hither, from thy home,

hither - aquí, acá, citerior

thy - tu; vuestro, vuestra, vuestros, vuestras

Airy sprite, I bid thee come!

airy - aireado; airoso

sprite - duendecillo

bid - ofertar; pujar, hacer una oferta

Born of roses, fed on dew,

dew - rocío

Charms and potions canst thou brew?

charms - encantos; encanto

potions - pociones; poción, brebaje, elixir, pócima

canst - anst

thou - tú; vos

brew - cerveza; elaborar bebidas fermentadas

Bring me here, with elfin speed,

elfin - Elfo

The fragrant philter which I need.

fragrant - oloroso; fragante, perfumado

Make it sweet and swift and strong,

swift - rápido, veloz, célere, pronto

Spirit, answer now my song!

A soft strain of music sounded, and then at the back of the cave appeared a little figure in cloudy white, with glittering wings, golden hair, and a garland of roses on its head. Waving a wand, it sang...

cloudy - nublado, nublo, turbio

garland - guirnalda, galardón, marco de honor

wand - varita

Hither I come,

From my airy home,

Afar in the silver moon.

afar - lejos; afar

silver moon - Luna de plata

Take the magic spell,

And use it well,

Or its power will vanish soon!

vanish - desvanecerse, desaparecer, anularse

And dropping a small, gilded bottle at the witch's feet, the spirit vanished. Another chant from Hagar produced another apparition, not a lovely one, for with a bang an ugly black imp appeared and, having croaked a reply, tossed a dark bottle at Hugo and disappeared with a mocking laugh. Having warbled his thanks and put the potions in his boots, Hugo departed, and Hagar informed the audience that as he had killed a few of her friends in times past, she had cursed him, and intends to thwart his plans, and be revenged on him.

gilded - dorado; dorar

vanished - desaparecido; desvanecerse, desaparecer, anularse

chant - cantar; salmodiar

apparition - aparición

imp - diablillo

croaked - crujió; croar, palmar

mocking - burlándose; burlón; (moc) burlándose; burlón

warbled - warbled; trinar, gorjear

departed - se ha ido; irse, salir, partir, panish:

informed - informado; informar

cursed - Maldito; (curs) Maldito

thwart - frustrar, contrariar, bancada

revenged - vengarme; venganza

Then the curtain fell, and the audience reposed and ate candy while discussing the merits of the play.

reposed - reposado; reposo

candy - caramelos; dulce, bombón

merits - méritos; mérito, merecimiento, meritar

A good deal of hammering went on before the curtain rose again, but when it became evident what a masterpiece of stage carpentery had been got up, no one murmured at the delay. It was truly superb. A tower rose to the ceiling, halfway up appeared a window with a lamp burning in it, and behind the white curtain appeared Zara in a lovely blue and silver dress, waiting for Roderigo. He came in gorgeous array, with plumed cap, red cloak, chestnut lovelocks, a guitar, and the boots, of course. Kneeling at the foot of the tower, he sang a serenade in melting tones. Zara replied and, after a musical dialogue, consented to fly. Then came the grand effect of the play. Roderigo produced a rope ladder, with five steps to it, threw up one end, and invited Zara to descend.

hammering - Martilleando; (hammer); martillo, percutor, malleus, martillar

evident - es evidente; evidente, constatable

masterpiece - obra maestra

carpentery - carpintería

murmured - murmuró; soplo, murmurar

delay - retraso; aplazar, retrasar

superb - excelente; excepcional

halfway - a medio camino; a mediados, a mitad de, a caballo entre

array - atavío, galas, distribución, ristra, gama, vector, arreglo

plumed - plumaje; ciruela

kneeling - De rodillas; (kneel); arrodillarse

serenade - serenata, panish: dar serenata

melting - fundiendo; fusión, fundición, derretimiento

consented - consintió; consentir, consentimiento, venia, anuencia

grand - grande; magnífico, espléndido, imponente

rope ladder - escalera de cuerda

descend - descender, bajar

Timidly she crept from her lattice, put her hand on Roderigo's shoulder, and was about to leap gracefully down when "Alas! Alas for Zara!" she forgot her train. It caught in the window, the tower tottered, leaned forward, fell with a crash, and buried the unhappy lovers in the ruins.

timidly - tímidamente

lattice - enrejado; celosía, trama, cuadrícula, retículo, checkrejilla

leap - salto; saltar, brincar

gracefully - con elegancia; agraciadamente

Alas - !ay!; (ala) !ay!

tottered - se tambaleó; tambalearse, bascular, dar tumbos

leaned - apoyado; inclinarse

crash - chocar; estruendo, estrépito

lovers - amante

ruins - ruinas; ruina, desbaratar, arruinar, estropear, dar al traste

A universal shriek arose as the russet boots waved wildly from the wreck and a golden head emerged, exclaiming, "I told you so! I told you so!" With wonderful presence of mind, Don Pedro, the cruel sire, rushed in, dragged out his daughter, with a hasty aside...

universal - universal

shriek - gritar; alarido, chillido, chillar

arose - surgió; surgir, levantarse, provenir, aparecer

wildly - alocadamente, salvajemente

wreck - naufragio; cacharro, trasto, guinapo, choque, desastre

emerged - surgió; emerger, aparecer, surgir, aparecer, aflorar

exclaiming - exclamando; exclamar

presence - presencia

sire - amo, dueno, senor, seor

rushed - apurado; precipitarse, lanzarse, correr, ir rápidamente

dragged - arrastrado; llevar a rastras

hasty - apresurarse; apresurado, de prisa, arrebatado, atropellado

aside - aparte, a un lado, aparte

"Don't laugh! Act as if it was all right!" and, ordering Roderigo up, banished him from the kingdom with wrath and scorn. Though decidedly shaken by the fall from the tower upon him, Roderigo defied the old gentleman and refused to stir. This dauntless example fired Zara.

banished - desterrado; desterrar

Kingdom - reino

wrath - cólera, ira, castigo

scorn - despreciar, desdenar, menospreciar, rechazar, escarnecer

refused - rechazado; negarse (a)

stir - remover, revolver

dauntless - intrépido; impertérrito

She also defied her sire, and he ordered them both to the deepest dungeons of the castle. A stout little retainer came in with chains and led them away, looking very much frightened and evidently forgetting the speech he ought to have made.

dungeons - mazmorras; mazmorra, calabozo

stout - cerveza; sólido, fuerte

retainer - criado, retenedor

evidently - evidentemente

Act third was the castle hall, and here Hagar appeared, having come to free the lovers and finish Hugo. She hears him coming and hides, sees him put the potions into two cups of wine and bid the timid little servant, "Bear them to the captives in their cells, and tell them I shall come anon." The servant takes Hugo aside to tell him something, and Hagar changes the cups for two others which are harmless.

captives - cautivos; cautivo, prisionero, preso

cells - células; celda

anon - anónimo

Ferdinando, the ˜minion', carries them away, and Hagar puts back the cup which holds the poison meant for Roderigo. Hugo, getting thirsty after a long warble, drinks it, loses his wits, and after a good deal of clutching and stamping, falls flat and dies, while Hagar informs him what she has done in a song of exquisite power and melody.

puts back - volver

warble - trinar, gorjear

informs - informar

exquisite - exquisito, bonísimo

This was a truly thrilling scene, though some persons might have thought that the sudden tumbling down of a quantity of long red hair rather marred the effect of the villain's death. He was called before the curtain, and with great propriety appeared, leading Hagar, whose singing was considered more wonderful than all the rest of the performance put together.

marred - stropeado; estropear, echar a perder

propriety - aptitud, propiedad

more wonderful - más maravilloso

Act fourth displayed the despairing Roderigo on the point of stabbing himself because he has been told that Zara has deserted him. Just as the dagger is at his heart, a lovely song is sung under his window, informing him that Zara is true but in danger, and he can save her if he will. A key is thrown in, which unlocks the door, and in a spasm of rapture he tears off his chains and rushes away to find and rescue his lady love.

displayed - aparece; espectáculo, exposición, monitor, expositor

Stabbing - apunalamiento; apunalamiento; (stab) apunalamiento; apunalamiento

informing - informar

unlocks - abrir, abrir con llave, desatrancar, desbloquear

spasm - espasmo, acceso

rapture - arrebatamiento

rushes - prisas; precipitarse, lanzarse, correr, ir rápidamente

rescue - salvamento; rescatar, rescate

Act fifth opened with a stormy scene between Zara and Don Pedro. He wishes her to go into a convent, but she won't hear of it, and after a touching appeal, is about to faint when Roderigo dashes in and demands her hand. Don Pedro refuses, because he is not rich. They shout and gesticulate tremendously but cannot agree, and Rodrigo is about to bear away the exhausted Zara, when the timid servant enters with a letter and a bag from Hagar, who has mysteriously disappeared. The latter informs the party that she bequeaths untold wealth to the young pair and an awful doom to Don Pedro, if he doesn't make them happy. The bag is opened, and several quarts of tin money shower down upon the stage till it is quite glorified with the glitter.

stormy - borrascoso, tempestuoso, tormentoso

convent - convento

appeal - apelación; suplicar, rogar

dashes - guiones; raya, guion largo, carrerita, gota, pizca, lanzarse

demands - demandas; demanda, exigencia, exigir, demandar

refuses - se niega; negarse (a)

tremendously - remendamente

bear away - lograr, llevar

exhausted - exhausto; agotar, cansar, tubo de escape, gas de escape

mysteriously - misteriosamente

bequeaths - egados; heredar, legar, dejar, ceder, transmitir

untold - in contar

wealth - prosperidad, riqueza

doom - condenar, danar

quarts - cuartos de galón; cuarta, cuarto de galón

glorified - glorificado; glorificar

glitter - brillo, purpurina, escarcha, brillar, resplandecer, centellear

This entirely softens the stern sire. He consents without a murmur, all join in a joyful chorus, and the curtain falls upon the lovers kneeling to receive Don Pedro's blessing in attitudes of the most romantic grace.

softens - se ablanda; ablandar, suavizar

stern - severo, austero, serio

consents - consentimientos; consentir, consentimiento, venia, anuencia

murmur - murmullo; soplo, murmurar

joyful - alegre, gozoso

blessing - bendición; (bless); bendición

most romantic - el más romántico

grace - gracias, benedícite, gracia, donaire, merced

Tumultuous applause followed but received an unexpected check, for the cot bed, on which the dress circle was built, suddenly shut up and extinguished the enthusiastic audience. Roderigo and Don Pedro flew to the rescue, and all were taken out unhurt, though many were speechless with laughter. The excitement had hardly subsided when Hannah appeared, with "Mrs. March's compliments, and would the ladies walk down to supper."

tumultuous - tumultuoso, bullicioso, tempestuoso

applause - aplausos; aplauso

unexpected - inesperado, inopinado

cot - cuna

extinguished - extinguido; extinguir, apagar

enthusiastic - entusiasmado, entusiástico

speechless - sin palabras, sin habla, atónito, perplejo

subsided - se calmó; calmarse

compliments - cumplidos; cumplido, felicitar, cumplimentar

This was a surprise even to the actors, and when they saw the table, they looked at one another in rapturous amazement. It was like Marmee to get up a little treat for them, but anything so fine as this was unheard of since the departed days of plenty.

amazement - asombro, sorpresa

unheard - No se oye

There was ice cream, actually two dishes of it, pink and white, and cake and fruit and distracting French bonbons and, in the middle of the table, four great bouquets of hot house flowers.

distracting - distraer, despistar

bonbons - Bombón

bouquets - ramilletes; ramo, ramita, buqué, aroma

It quite took their breath away, and they stared first at the table and then at their mother, who looked as if she enjoyed it immensely.

immensely - inmensamente

"Is it fairies?" asked Amy.

fairies - hadas; hada, marica, mujercita

"Santa Claus," said Beth.

"Mother did it." And Meg smiled her sweetest, in spite of her gray beard and white eyebrows.

eyebrows - cejas; ceja

"Aunt March had a good fit and sent the supper," cried Jo, with a sudden inspiration.

sudden inspiration - Inspiración repentina

"All wrong. Old Mr. Laurence sent it," replied Mrs. March.

"The Laurence boy's grandfather! What in the world put such a thing into his head? We don't know him!" exclaimed Meg.

"Hannah told one of his servants about your breakfast party. He is an odd old gentleman, but that pleased him. He knew my father years ago, and he sent me a polite note this afternoon, saying he hoped I would allow him to express his friendly feeling toward my children by sending them a few trifles in honor of the day. I could not refuse, and so you have a little feast at night to make up for the bread-and-milk breakfast."

toward - hacia, sobre, para

trifles - baratijas; sopa inglesa, pizca, nadería, nimiedad, zarandaja

refuse - rechazar; negarse (a)

feast - fiesta; banquete, festín

"That boy put it into his head, I know he did! He's a capital fellow, and I wish we could get acquainted. He looks as if he'd like to know us but he's bashful, and Meg is so prim she won't let me speak to him when we pass," said Jo, as the plates went round, and the ice began to melt out of sight, with ohs and ahs of satisfaction.

fellow - colega; tipo

acquainted - conocido; dar a conocer, familiarizar

bashful - tímido

melt - material fundido, derretirse, fundirse

"You mean the people who live in the big house next door, don't you?" asked one of the girls. "My mother knows old Mr. Laurence, but says he's very proud and doesn't like to mix with his neighbors. He keeps his grandson shut up, when he isn't riding or walking with his tutor, and makes him study very hard. We invited him to our party, but he didn't come. Mother says he's very nice, though he never speaks to us girls."

grandson - nieto

"Our cat ran away once, and he brought her back, and we talked over the fence, and were getting on capitally, all about cricket, and so on, when he saw Meg coming, and walked off. I mean to know him some day, for he needs fun, I'm sure he does," said Jo decidedly.

capitally - capitalmente

"I like his manners, and he looks like a little gentleman, so I've no objection to your knowing him, if a proper opportunity comes. He brought the flowers himself, and I should have asked him in, if I had been sure what was going on upstairs. He looked so wistful as he went away, hearing the frolic and evidently having none of his own."

objection - objeción, protesta

wistful - anorante; nostálgico, melancólico

frolic - juguetear, retozar, jugueteo

"It's a mercy you didn't, Mother!" laughed Jo, looking at her boots. "But we'll have another play sometime that he can see. Perhaps he'll help act. Wouldn't that be jolly?"

It's a mercy - Es un alivio

sometime - alguna vez; al rato, algún día, en algún momento

"I never had such a fine bouquet before! How pretty it is!" And Meg examined her flowers with great interest.

bouquet - ramo de flores; ramo, ramita, buqué, aroma

"They are lovely. But Beth's roses are sweeter to me," said Mrs. March, smelling the half-dead posy in her belt.

Beth nestled up to her, and whispered softly, "I wish I could send my bunch to Father. I'm afraid he isn't having such a merry Christmas as we are."

nestled - encajado; acomodarse, acurrucarse

bunch - manojo, punado, (flowers) ramo, bonchote, racimo, grupo

I'm afraid - Tengo miedo

CHAPTER THREE. THE LAURENCE BOY

"Jo! Jo! Where are you?" cried Meg at the foot of the garret stairs.

garret - buhardilla

"Here!" answered a husky voice from above, and, running up, Meg found her sister eating apples and crying over the Heir of Redclyffe, wrapped up in a comforter on an old three-legged sofa by the sunny window. This was Jo's favorite refuge, and here she loved to retire with half a dozen russets and a nice book, to enjoy the quiet and the society of a pet rat who lived near by and didn't mind her a particle. As Meg appeared, Scrabble whisked into his hole.

husky - ronco

heir - heredero, sucesor, checkheredera

wrapped - envuelto; enrollar

sunny - asoleado

refuge - refugio, refugiarse

russets - russets; ocre, marrojizo, marrojiza, color teja

rat - rata

near by - en las cercanías

particle - partícula

Scrabble - Scrabble

whisked - batido; llevar rápidamente

Jo shook the tears off her cheeks and waited to hear the news.

cheeks - mejilla, cacha, cachete, nalga, glúteo, descoco

"Such fun! Only see! A regular note of invitation from Mrs. Gardiner for tomorrow night!" cried Meg, waving the precious paper and then proceeding to read it with girlish delight.

girlish - femenino, de nina

"˜Mrs. Gardiner would be happy to see Miss March and Miss Josephine at a little dance on New Year's Eve.'Marmee is willing we should go, now what shall we wear?"

New Year's Eve - Noche Vieja/ Fin del Ano

"What's the use of asking that, when you know we shall wear our poplins, because we haven't got anything else?" answered Jo with her mouth full.

poplins - Popplin

"If I only had a silk!" sighed Meg. "Mother says I may when I'm eighteen perhaps, but two years is an everlasting time to wait."

silk - seda

everlasting - perpetua; inmarcesible

"I'm sure our pops look like silk, and they are nice enough for us. Yours is as good as new, but I forgot the burn and the tear in mine. Whatever shall I do? The burn shows badly, and I can't take any out."

"You must sit still all you can and keep your back out of sight. The front is all right. I shall have a new ribbon for my hair, and Marmee will lend me her little pearl pin, and my new slippers are lovely, and my gloves will do, though they aren't as nice as I'd like."

pearl - perla, parisienne

aren - No

"Mine are spoiled with lemonade, and I can't get any new ones, so I shall have to go without," said Jo, who never troubled herself much about dress.

lemonade - limonada, gaseosa de limón, soda limonada

"You must have gloves, or I won't go," cried Meg decidedly. "Gloves are more important than anything else. You can't dance without them, and if you don't I should be so mortified."

mortified - mortificado; mortificar, matar

"Then I'll stay still. I don't care much for company dancing. It's no fun to go sailing round. I like to fly about and cut capers."

sailing round - navegar alrededor; dar la vuelta en barco

capers - caparras; juguetear, brincar

"You can't ask Mother for new ones, they are so expensive, and you are so careless. She said when you spoiled the others that she shouldn't get you any more this winter. Can't you make them do?"

shouldn - Debería

"I can hold them crumpled up in my hand, so no one will know how stained they are. That's all I can do. No! I'll tell you how we can manage, each wear one good one and carry a bad one. Don't you see?"

crumpled - arrugado; arrugar, colapsar

stained - manchado; mancha, lamparón, tacha, mancilla, colorante

"Your hands are bigger than mine, and you will stretch my glove dreadfully," began Meg, whose gloves were a tender point with her.

stretch - estirar, estirarse, dar, extenderse, estirón, estiramiento

tender - tierno

"Then I'll go without. I don't care what people say!" cried Jo, taking up her book.

"You may have it, you may! Only don't stain it, and do behave nicely. Don't put your hands behind you, or stare, or say ˜Christopher Columbus!'will you?"

stain - mancha, lamparón, tacha, mancilla, colorante, contraste

nicely - espléndidamente, bien

stare - mirar fijamente

Christopher - Cristóbal

Columbus - Cristóbal Colón

"Don't worry about me. I'll be as prim as I can and not get into any scrapes, if I can help it. Now go and answer your note, and let me finish this splendid story."

Don't worry - No te preocupes

scrapes - raspaduras; raspar, aranarse, rasparse, abrasión, rasponazo

So Meg went away to ˜accept with thanks', look over her dress, and sing blithely as she did up her one real lace frill, while Jo finished her story, her four apples, and had a game of romps with Scrabble.

did up - abrochado, renovado, decorado, envuelto

lace - encaje; cordón

frill - frío; volante

romps - romps; retozar, retozo, revolcón

On New Year's Eve the parlor was deserted, for the two younger girls played dressing maids and the two elder were absorbed in the all-important business of ˜getting ready for the party'. Simple as the toilets were, there was a great deal of running up and down, laughing and talking, and at one time a strong smell of burned hair pervaded the house.

eve - víspera, vigilia

maids - sirvientas; doncella, senorita, doméstica, empleada doméstica

absorbed - absorbido; absorber

Meg wanted a few curls about her face, and Jo undertook to pinch the papered locks with a pair of hot tongs.

undertook - mprendió; emprender, acometer

pinch - pellizcar, repizcar, afanar, chorizar, pellizco

"Ought they to smoke like that?" asked Beth from her perch on the bed.

perch - percha

"It's the dampness drying," replied Jo.

"What a queer smell! It's like burned feathers," observed Amy, smoothing her own pretty curls with a superior air.

feathers - plumas; pluma

superior - superior, superior

"There, now I'll take off the papers and you'll see a cloud of little ringlets," said Jo, putting down the tongs.

ringlets - irabuzón

She did take off the papers, but no cloud of ringlets appeared, for the hair came with the papers, and the horrified hairdresser laid a row of little scorched bundles on the bureau before her victim.

horrified - horrorizado; horripilar

Hairdresser - peluquero, peluquera

Row - hilera, fila

scorched - quemado; chamuscar

bureau - oficina, escritorio, cómoda

"Oh, oh, oh! What have you done? I'm spoiled! I can't go! My hair, oh, my hair!" wailed Meg, looking with despair at the uneven frizzle on her forehead.

wailed - gimió; llorar, gimotear; ulular; planir

despair - desesperar, desesperanzar, desesperación, desesperanza

"Just my luck! You shouldn't have asked me to do it. I always spoil everything. I'm so sorry, but the tongs were too hot, and so I've made a mess," groaned poor Jo, regarding the little black pancakes with tears of regret.

spoil - expoliar, despojar, danar, arruinar, echar a perder

groaned - gimió; gemido, grunido, gemir, grunir

regarding - con respecto a; considerar

pancakes - panqueques; hot cake

regret - lamentar, pena, pesar, arrepentimiento

"It isn't spoiled. Just frizzle it, and tie your ribbon so the ends come on your forehead a bit, and it will look like the last fashion. I've seen many girls do it so," said Amy consolingly.

consolingly - Consoladoramente

"Serves me right for trying to be fine. I wish I'd let my hair alone," cried Meg petulantly.

petulantly - con petulancia

"So do I, it was so smooth and pretty. But it will soon grow out again," said Beth, coming to kiss and comfort the shorn sheep.

Shorn - Esquilada; (shear); cizallar, cortar, esquilar, tonsurar, tundir

After various lesser mishaps, Meg was finished at last, and by the united exertions of the entire family Jo's hair was got up and her dress on. They looked very well in their simple suits, Meg's in silvery drab, with a blue velvet snood, lace frills, and the pearl pin. Jo in maroon, with a stiff, gentlemanly linen collar, and a white chrysanthemum or two for her only ornament. Each put on one nice light glove, and carried one soiled one, and all pronounced the effect "quite easy and fine".

mishaps - percances; contratiempo, percance

exertions - esfuerzos; esfuerzo

entire - entero

silvery - plateado, argénteo, argentino

drab - apagado, soso, sin gracia, gris

velvet - terciopelo

snood - redecilla, cintillo, moco de pavo

frills - volantes; volante

maroon - granate

linen - lino, linge, ropa blanca, linocros

collar - cuello, collar, yugo

chrysanthemum - crisantemo

Meg's high-heeled slippers were very tight and hurt her, though she would not own it, and Jo's nineteen hairpins all seemed stuck straight into her head, which was not exactly comfortable, but, dear me, let us be elegant or die.

heeled - con tacón; talón

hairpins - horquillas; horquilla, gancho, pinche

"Have a good time, dearies!" said Mrs. March, as the sisters went daintily down the walk. "Don't eat much supper, and come away at eleven when I send Hannah for you." As the gate clashed behind them, a voice cried from a window...

dearies - Querido

clashed - chocaron; estruendo, escaramuza

"Girls, girls! Have you you both got nice pocket handkerchiefs?"

"Yes, yes, spandy nice, and Meg has cologne on hers," cried Jo, adding with a laugh as they went on, "I do believe Marmee would ask that if we were all running away from an earthquake."

"It is one of her aristocratic tastes, and quite proper, for a real lady is always known by neat boots, gloves, and handkerchief," replied Meg, who had a good many little ˜aristocratic tastes'of her own.

aristocratic - aristocrático

neat - bien; pulcro, ordenado

"Now don't forget to keep the bad breadth out of sight, Jo. Is my sash right? And does my hair look very bad?" said Meg, as she turned from the glass in Mrs. Gardiner's dressing room after a prolonged prink.

sash - faja; fajín (militar)

prolonged - prolongado; prolongar

prink - Pink

"I know I shall forget. If you see me doing anything wrong, just remind me by a wink, will you?" returned Jo, giving her collar a twitch and her head a hasty brush.

wink - guino; guinar el ojo

twitch - crispar(se), mover(se) convulsivamente

"No, winking isn't ladylike. I'll lift my eyebrows if any thing is wrong, and nod if you are all right. Now hold your shoulder straight, and take short steps, and don't shake hands if you are introduced to anyone. It isn't the thing."

winking - guinando el ojo; (wink) guinando el ojo

nod - asentir, cabecear, cabezada

"How do you learn all the proper ways? I never can. Isn't that music gay?"

gay - gay, homosexual

Down they went, feeling a trifle timid, for they seldom went to parties, and informal as this little gathering was, it was an event to them. Mrs. Gardiner, a stately old lady, greeted them kindly and handed them over to the eldest of her six daughters. Meg knew Sallie and was at her ease very soon, but Jo, who didn't care much for girls or girlish gossip, stood about, with her back carefully against the wall, and felt as much out of place as a colt in a flower garden. Half a dozen jovial lads were talking about skates in another part of the room, and she longed to go and join them, for skating was one of the joys of her life. She telegraphed her wish to Meg, but the eyebrows went up so alarmingly that she dared not stir.

ease - facilidad; aliviar

girlish - nina

gossip - chismoso, chismosa, chisme, chismear, cotillear, chismorrear

stood about - quedarse; estar sin hacer nada

flower garden - jardín de flores

jovial - jovial, alegre

lads - chicos; nino, chico, mozo, mozalbete

skates - patines; patín de hielo

skating - patinando; patinaje; (skat) patinando; patinaje

joys - legrías; alegría, júbilo

dared - se atrevió; atraverse, osar

No one came to talk to her, and one by one the group dwindled away till she was left alone. She could not roam about and amuse herself, for the burned breadth would show, so she stared at people rather forlornly till the dancing began. Meg was asked at once, and the tight slippers tripped about so briskly that none would have guessed the pain their wearer suffered smilingly. Jo saw a big red headed youth approaching her corner, and fearing he meant to engage her, she slipped into a curtained recess, intending to peep and enjoy herself in peace. Unfortunately, another bashful person had chosen the same refuge, for, as the curtain fell behind her, she found herself face to face with the ˜Laurence boy'.

dwindled - disminuido; disminuir, agotarse, desaparecer, menguar

roam - vagar

amuse - entretener, distraer, divertir

forlornly - desesperadamente; tristemente, desgraciadamente

briskly - enérgicamente; con brío, brioso; rápido, enérgico, briosamente

wearer - Usador

smilingly - Sonriendo

approaching - se acerca; acercarse, aproximarse

engage - participar; atraer, trabar conversación con, trabar batalla

recess - receso

peep - espiar

fell behind - quedarse atrás

"Dear me, I didn't know anyone was here!" stammered Jo, preparing to back out as speedily as she had bounced in.

stammered - tartamudeó; tartamudear, balbucir, balbucear, gaguear

speedily - rápidamente

bounced - rebotó; rebotar, rebote

But the boy laughed and said pleasantly, though he looked a little startled, "Don't mind me, stay if you like."

pleasantly - agradablemente

startled - sorprendido; sobresaltarse, alarmarse, espantarse, evitar

"Shan't I disturb you?"

disturb - perturbar, molestar

"Not a bit. I only came here because I don't know many people and felt rather strange at first, you know."

"So did I. Don't go away, please, unless you'd rather."

The boy sat down again and looked at his pumps, till Jo said, trying to be polite and easy, "I think I've had the pleasure of seeing you before. You live near us, don't you?"

pumps - bombas; bomba

"Next door." And he looked up and laughed outright, for Jo's prim manner was rather funny when he remembered how they had chatted about cricket when he brought the cat home.

That put Jo at her ease and she laughed too, as she said, in her heartiest way, "We did have such a good time over your nice Christmas present."

heartiest - ás cordial; carinoso, de corazón, cordial, corpulento, nutritivo

"Grandpa sent it."

grandpa - abuelo, abuelito, yayo

"But you put it into his head, didn't you, now?"

"How is your cat, Miss March?" asked the boy, trying to look sober while his black eyes shone with fun.

sober - sobrio, sereno, apagado

"Nicely, thank you, Mr. Laurence. But I am not Miss March, I'm only Jo," returned the young lady.

"I'm not Mr. Laurence, I'm only Laurie."

"Laurie Laurence, what an odd name."

"My first name is Theodore, but I don't like it, for the fellows called me Dora, so I made them say Laurie instead."

fellows - companeros; tipo

"I hate my name, too, so sentimental! I wish every one would say Jo instead of Josephine. How did you make the boys stop calling you Dora?"

sentimental - sentimental, sentimentaloide, sensiblero, cursi

"I thrashed 'em."

thrashed - golpeado; vapulear

"I can't thrash Aunt March, so I suppose I shall have to bear it." And Jo resigned herself with a sigh.

thrash - vapulear

resigned - renunció; dimitir

"Don't you like to dance, Miss Jo?" asked Laurie, looking as if he thought the name suited her.

"I like it well enough if there is plenty of room, and everyone is lively. In a place like this I'm sure to upset something, tread on people's toes, or do something dreadful, so I Keep out of mischief and let Meg sail about. Don't you dance?"

tread - pisada; pisar, pisotear, hollar

Keep out of mischief - evitar problemas

"Sometimes. You see I've been abroad a good many years, and haven't been into company enough yet to know how you do things here."

"Abroad!" cried Jo. "Oh, tell me about it! I love dearly to hear people describe their travels."

Laurie didn't seem to know where to begin, but Jo's eager questions soon set him going, and he told her how he had been at school in Vevay, where the boys never wore hats and had a fleet of boats on the lake, and for holiday fun went on walking trips about Switzerland with their teachers.

Fleet - flota

Switzerland - Suiza

"Don't I wish I'd been there!" cried Jo. "Did you go to Paris?"

"We spent last winter there."

"Can you talk French?"

"We were not allowed to speak anything else at Vevay."

"Do say some! I can read it, but can't pronounce."

"Quel nom a cette jeune demoiselle en les pantoufles jolis?"

quel - Qué

"How nicely you do it! Let me see ... you said, ˜Who is the young lady in the pretty slippers', didn't you?"

"Oui, mademoiselle."

"It's my sister Margaret, and you knew it was! Do you think she is pretty?"

"Yes, she makes me think of the German girls, she looks so fresh and quiet, and dances like a lady."

German - alemán, alemana, germano, germana

Jo quite glowed with pleasure at this boyish praise of her sister, and stored it up to repeat to Meg. Both peeped and criticized and chatted till they felt like old acquaintances. Laurie's bashfulness soon wore off, for Jo's gentlemanly demeanor amused and set him at his ease, and Jo was her merry self again, because her dress was forgotten and nobody lifted their eyebrows at her.

glowed - brillaba; fulgir, fulgurar, iluminar, brillar

peeped - spiado; espiar

criticized - criticado; criticar, culpar, juzgar

acquaintances - conocidos; amistad, conocimiento, junta, relación

wore off - desaparecer, desvanecerse, pasarse

demeanor - comportamiento, conducta, proceder

amused - divertido; entretener, distraer, divertir

self - yo; uno mismo

She liked the ˜Laurence boy'better than ever and took several good looks at him, so that she might describe him to the girls, for they had no brothers, very few male cousins, and boys were almost unknown creatures to them.

unknown - ignoto, desconocido, incógnita, desconocido

creatures - criaturas; criatura

"Curly black hair, brown skin, big black eyes, handsome nose, fine teeth, small hands and feet, taller than I am, very polite, for a boy, and altogether jolly. Wonder how old he is?"

It was on the tip of Jo's tongue to ask, but she checked herself in time and, with unusual tact, tried to find out in a round-about way.

tact - tacto, tiento, mano izquierda

round-about - (round-about) alrededor, cerca de

"I suppose you are going to college soon? I see you pegging away at your books, no, I mean studying hard." And Jo blushed at the dreadful ˜pegging'which had escaped her.

pegging - Pegar; (peg); clavija, tarugo, colgador, perchero, gancho

blushed - se sonrojó; sonrojo, rubor

Laurie smiled but didn't seem shocked, and answered with a shrug. "Not for a year or two. I won't go before seventeen, anyway."

shocked - sorprendido; conmoción, golpe

shrug - encogimiento de hombros, encogerse de hombros

"Aren't you but fifteen?" asked Jo, looking at the tall lad, whom she had imagined seventeen already.

lad - nino, chico, mozo, mozalbete

"Sixteen, next month."

"How I wish I was going to college! You don't look as if you liked it."

"I hate it! Nothing but grinding or skylarking. And I don't like the way fellows do either, in this country."

grinding - moliendo; molienda; (grind) moliendo; molienda

skylarking - alondra

"What do you like?"

"To live in Italy, and to enjoy myself in my own way."

Italy - Italia

Jo wanted very much to ask what his own way was, but his black brows looked rather threatening as he knit them, so she changed the subject by saying, as her foot kept time, "That's a splendid polka! Why don't you go and try it?"

brows - cejas; (brow) cejas

threatening - amenazante; amenazador; (threaten); amenazar

polka - polca

"If you will come too," he answered, with a gallant little bow.

gallant - galante; gallardo, intrépido

bow - arco; inclinar(se), hacer una reverencia

"I can't, for I told Meg I wouldn't, because..." There Jo stopped, and looked undecided whether to tell or to laugh.

undecided - indecisos; indeciso

"Because, what?"

"You won't tell?"

"Never!"

"Well, I have a bad trick of standing before the fire, and so I burn my frocks, and I scorched this one, and though it's nicely mended, it shows, and Meg told me to keep still so no one would see it. You may laugh, if you want to. It is funny, I know."

frocks - vestidos; vestido

mended - reparado; remiendo, remendar, reparar

keep still - mantenerse quieto

But Laurie didn't laugh. He only looked down a minute, and the expression of his face puzzled Jo when he said very gently, "Never mind that. I'll tell you how we can manage. There's a long hall out there, and we can dance grandly, and no one will see us. Please come."

puzzled - rompecabezas, enigma, puzle, acertijo, intrigar, dejar perplejo

grandly - Grandiosamente

Jo thanked him and gladly went, wishing she had two neat gloves when she saw the nice, pearl-colored ones her partner wore. The hall was empty, and they had a grand polka, for Laurie danced well, and taught her the German step, which delighted Jo, being full of swing and spring. When the music stopped, they sat down on the stairs to get their breath, and Laurie was in the midst of an account of a students'festival at Heidelberg when Meg appeared in search of her sister.

swing - balanceo; balancear, mecer, columpiar, oscilar, columpio

midst - en medio; centro

She beckoned, and Jo reluctantly followed her into a side room, where she found her on a sofa, holding her foot, and looking pale.

beckoned - llamado; llamar con senas, atraer

reluctantly - a reganadientes, de mala gana, con renuencia

"I've sprained my ankle. That stupid high heel turned and gave me a sad wrench. It aches so, I can hardly stand, and I don't know how I'm ever going to get home," she said, rocking to and fro in pain.

sprained - torcer, esguinzar, hacerse una esguince, torcedura, esguince

high heel - Tacón alto

wrench - llave inglesa; arrancar

aches - dolores; dolor

"I knew you'd hurt your feet with those silly shoes. I'm sorry. But I don't see what you can do, except get a carriage, or stay here all night," answered Jo, softly rubbing the poor ankle as she spoke.

carriage - coche, carruaje

rubbing - Frotar; (rub); frotación, frotamiento, frote, frotar

"I can't have a carriage without its costing ever so much. I dare say I can't get one at all, for most people come in their own, and it's a long way to the stable, and no one to send."

dare - te atreves; atraverse, osar

stable - Estable

"I'll go."

"No, indeed! It's past nine, and dark as Egypt. I can't stop here, for the house is full. Sallie has some girls staying with her. I'll rest till Hannah comes, and then do the best I can."

"I'll ask Laurie. He will go," said Jo, looking relieved as the idea occurred to her.

relieved - aliviado; aliviar, relevar

"Mercy, no! Don't ask or tell anyone. Get me my rubbers, and put these slippers with our things. I can't dance anymore, but as soon as supper is over, watch for Hannah and tell me the minute she comes."

mercy - misericordia, piedad

Don't ask - No preguntes

rubbers - cauchos; caucho, goma

anymore - Ya no

"They are going out to supper now. I'll stay with you. I'd rather."

"No, dear, run along, and bring me some coffee. I'm so tired I can't stir."

So Meg reclined, with rubbers well hidden, and Jo went blundering away to the dining room, which she found after going into a china closet, and opening the door of a room where old Mr. Gardiner was taking a little private refreshment. Making a dart at the table, she secured the coffee, which she immediately spilled, thereby making the front of her dress as bad as the back.

reclined - reclinado; reclinarse

blundering - trompicones; (blunder); error

dining - cenar; jaleo

closet - ropero, armario, clóset

refreshment - refresco; refrescamiento, refrigerio

dart - dardo, flechilla

secured - seguro, resguardado, confiable, aplomado

spilled - erramado; derramar, verter

thereby - así, de ese modo

"Oh, dear, what a blunderbuss I am!" exclaimed Jo, finishing Meg's glove by scrubbing her gown with it.

blunderbuss - trabuco

scrubbing - fregando; fregar bien, restregar

"Can I help you?" said a friendly voice. And there was Laurie, with a full cup in one hand and a plate of ice in the other.

"I was trying to get something for Meg, who is very tired, and someone shook me, and here I am in a nice state," answered Jo, glancing dismally from the stained skirt to the coffee-colored glove.

glancing - echando un vistazo; (glance); ojear, echar un vistazo, mirar

dismally - Desalentadoramente

"Too bad! I was looking for someone to give this to. May I take it to your sister?"

"Oh, thank you! I'll show you where she is. I don't offer to take it myself, for I should only get into another scrape if I did."

scrape - raspar, aranarse, rasparse, abrasión, rasponazo, pelea, pinada

Jo led the way, and as if used to waiting on ladies, Laurie drew up a little table, brought a second installment of coffee and ice for Jo, and was so obliging that even particular Meg pronounced him a ˜nice boy'. They had a merry time over the bonbons and mottoes, and were in the midst of a quiet game of Buzz, with two or three other young people who had strayed in, when Hannah appeared.

installment - entrega

obliging - complaciente; obligar

mottoes - lemas; mote, divisa, lema

buzz - zumbido, zurrido, suspiro, zumbar, abejorrear, zurrir, comentar

strayed - se ha extraviado; extraviarse, perderse

Meg forgot her foot and rose so quickly that she was forced to catch hold of Jo, with an exclamation of pain.

exclamation - exclamación

"Hush! Don't say anything," she whispered, adding aloud, "It's nothing. I turned my foot a little, that's all," and limped upstairs to put her things on.

Hush - callar, callarse, calmar, acallar, silencio

aloud - en voz alta, de viva voz

limped - cojeaba; flojo, flácido, mustio, débil

Hannah scolded, Meg cried, and Jo was at her wits'end, till she decided to take things into her own hands. Slipping out, she ran down and, finding a servant, asked if he could get her a carriage. It happened to be a hired waiter who knew nothing about the neighborhood and Jo was looking round for help when Laurie, who had heard what she said, came up and offered his grandfather's carriage, which had just come for him, he said.

scolded - renido; reganar, retar, renir

neighborhood - vecindad, barrio, vecindario, cercanía

offered - ofrecido; ofrecer

"It's so early! You can't mean to go yet?" began Jo, looking relieved but hesitating to accept the offer.

hesitating - dudando; vacilar, dudar, hesitar

"I always go early, I do, truly! Please let me take you home. It's all on my way, you know, and it rains, they say."

That settled it, and telling him of Meg's mishap, Jo gratefully accepted and rushed up to bring down the rest of the party. Hannah hated rain as much as a cat does so she made no trouble, and they rolled away in the luxurious close carriage, feeling very festive and elegant. Laurie went on the box so Meg could keep her foot up, and the girls talked over their party in freedom.

settled - resuelto; instalar, colocar

mishap - contratiempo, percance

gratefully - con gratitud

luxurious - lujoso

freedom - libertad

"I had a capital time. Did you?" asked Jo, rumpling up her hair, and making herself comfortable.

"Yes, till I hurt myself. Sallie's friend, Annie Moffat, took a fancy to me, and asked me to come and spend a week with her when Sallie does. She is going in the spring when the opera comes, and it will be perfectly splendid, if Mother only lets me go," answered Meg, cheering up at the thought.

opera - ópera; (opus) ópera

cheering up - animar

"I saw you dancing with the red headed man I ran away from. Was he nice?"

"Oh, very! His hair is auburn, not red, and he was very polite, and I had a delicious redowa with him."

Auburn - castano, bermejo

"He looked like a grasshopper in a fit when he did the new step. Laurie and I couldn't help laughing. Did you hear us?"

grasshopper - saltamontes, langosta, chapulín

I couldn't help laughing - No pude evitar reírme.

"No, but it was very rude. What were you about all that time, hidden away there?"

Jo told her adventures, and by the time she had finished they were at home. With Many thanks, they said good night and crept in, hoping to disturb no one, but the instant their door creaked, two little nightcaps bobbed up, and two sleepy but eager voices cried out...

Many thanks - Muchas gracias

instant - instantáneo, inmediato

creaked - rujió; crujido, crujir, chirriar, rechinar

nightcaps - nightcaps; gorro de dormir

bobbed - bobbed; Beto

sleepy - tienes sueno; sueno, cansado, adormecido, sonoliento

"Tell about the party! Tell about the party!"

With what Meg called ˜a great want of manners'Jo had saved some bonbons for the little girls, and they soon subsided, after hearing the most thrilling events of the evening.

"I declare, it really seems like being a fine young lady, to come home from the party in a carriage and sit in my dressing gown with a maid to wait on me," said Meg, as Jo bound up her foot with arnica and brushed her hair.

declare - explicar, aclarar, declarar

dressing gown - bata

maid - mucama; doncella, senorita, doméstica, empleada doméstica

bound - atado; (bind); atar, atar (tie), empastar (books), liar

arnica - árnica

"I don't believe fine young ladies enjoy themselves a bit more than we do, in spite of our burned hair, old gowns, one glove apiece and tight slippers that sprain our ankles when we are silly enough to wear them." And I think Jo was quite right.

sprain - torcer, esguinzar, hacerse una esguince, torcedura, esguince

CHAPTER FOUR. BURDENS

"Oh, dear, how hard it does seem to take up our packs and go on," sighed Meg the morning after the party, for now the holidays were over, the week of merrymaking did not fit her for going on easily with the task she never liked.

merrymaking - festejando; verbena, celebración, fiesta, jolgorio

"I wish it was Christmas or New Year's all the time. Wouldn't it be fun?" answered Jo, yawning dismally.

yawning - Bostezando; (yawn); bostezar, abrirse, bostezo

"We shouldn't enjoy ourselves half so much as we do now. But it does seem so nice to have little suppers and bouquets, and go to parties, and drive home, and read and rest, and not work. It's like other people, you know, and I always envy girls who do such things, I'm so fond of luxury," said Meg, trying to decide which of two shabby gowns was the least shabby.

suppers - cenas; cena

envy - envidia, pelusa, envidiar

fond - carinoso, afectuoso

shabby - desalinado; raído, astroso, zarrapastroso, cutre, harapiento

"Well, we can't have it, so don't let us grumble but shoulder our bundles and trudge along as cheerfully as Marmee does. I'm sure Aunt March is a regular Old Man of the Sea to me, but I suppose when I've learned to carry her without complaining, she will tumble off, or get so light that I shan't mind her."

grumble - grunir; refunfunar, rezongar

tumble - dar la vuelta; caída, caer, revolverse

This idea tickled Jo's fancy and put her in good spirits, but Meg didn't brighten, for her burden, consisting of four spoiled children, seemed heavier than ever. She had not heart enough even to make herself pretty as usual by putting on a blue neck ribbon and dressing her hair in the most becoming way.

tickled - cosquilla, hacer cosquillas, cosquillear

most becoming - el más adecuado

"Where's the use of looking nice, when no one sees me but those cross midgets, and no one cares whether I'm pretty or not?" she muttered, shutting her drawer with a jerk. "I shall have to toil and moil all my days, with only little bits of fun now and then, and get old and ugly and sour, because I'm poor and can't enjoy my life as other girls do. It's a shame!"

midgets - enanos; enano, chichón de piso, retaco

drawer - cajón

jerk - imbécil; sacudida

toil - esfuerzo, labrar, trabajar

sour - agrio, ácido, acedo, acidez

It's a shame - Es una pena

So Meg went down, wearing an injured look, and wasn't at all agreeable at breakfast time. Everyone seemed rather out of sorts and inclined to croak.

Beth had a headache and lay on the sofa, trying to comfort herself with the cat and three kittens. Amy was fretting because her lessons were not learned, and she couldn't find her rubbers. Jo would whistle and make a great racket getting ready.

kittens - gatitos; gatito, minino, gatita

racket - jaleo, barullo, escándalo, alboroto

Mrs. March was very busy trying to finish a letter, which must go at once, and Hannah had the grumps, for being up late didn't suit her.

"There never was such a cross family!" cried Jo, losing her temper when she had upset an inkstand, broken both boot lacings, and sat down upon her hat.

inkstand - tintero; escribanía

lacings - Cordón

"You're the crossest person in it!" returned Amy, washing out the sum that was all wrong with the tears that had fallen on her slate.

sum - suma

slate - pizarra

"Beth, if you don't keep these horrid cats down cellar I'll have them drowned," exclaimed Meg angrily as she tried to get rid of the kitten which had scrambled up her back and stuck like a burr just out of reach.

horrid - horrible; hórrido, horrendo

drowned - hogado; ahogarse

angrily - enfadado; furiosamente, con ira

kitten - gatito, minino, gatita

scrambled - revuelto; gatear, revolver, arrebato, arrebatina

burr - Rebaba

Jo laughed, Meg scolded, Beth implored, and Amy wailed because she couldn't remember how much nine times twelve was.

implored - imploró; implorar

"Girls, girls, do be quiet one minute! I must get this off by the early mail, and you drive me distracted with your worry," cried Mrs. March, crossing out the third spoiled sentence in her letter.

distracted - distraído; distraer, despistar

crossing out - tachar

There was a momentary lull, broken by Hannah, who stalked in, laid two hot turnovers on the table, and stalked out again. These turnovers were an institution, and the girls called them ˜muffs', for they had no others and found the hot pies very comforting to their hands on cold mornings.

momentary - momentánea; momentáneo

lull - calma; arrullar, adormecer

turnovers - vueltas; cifra de negocios, movimiento de mercancías, rotación

Institution - institución

pies - pasteles; tarta, empanada, pastel

comforting - confortante; comodidad, consuelo, confortar

Hannah never forgot to make them, no matter how busy or grumpy she might be, for the walk was long and bleak. The poor things got no other lunch and were seldom home before two.

grumpy - grunón; grunón, rezongón, refunfunón, renegón

bleak - lúgubre; inhóspito, desolado

"Cuddle your cats and get over your headache, Bethy. Goodbye, Marmee. We are a set of rascals this morning, but we'll come home regular angels. now then, Meg!" And Jo tramped away, feeling that the pilgrims were not setting out as they ought to do.

cuddle - abrazo, mimo, abrazar, hacer arrumacos, mecer

rascals - gamberros; pícaro, bribón, canalla

now then - Ahora, entonces

tramped - trampeado; vagabundo, vagabunda, golfa, ramera, puta

They always looked back before turning the corner, for their mother was always at the window to nod and smile, and wave her hand to them. Somehow it seemed as if they couldn't have got through the day without that, for whatever their mood might be, the last glimpse of that motherly face was sure to affect them like sunshine.

Glimpse - un vistazo; atisbo, entrever, atisbar, vislumbrar, ojear

"If Marmee shook her fist instead of kissing her hand to us, it would serve us right, for more ungrateful wretches than we are were never seen," cried Jo, taking a remorseful satisfaction in the snowy walk and bitter wind.

fist - puno

more ungrateful - más ingrato/desagradecido

wretches - desgraciados; desgraciado, miserable

remorseful - arrepentido, remordiente, compungido

Bitter - amargo

wind - viento, aire

"Don't use such dreadful expressions," replied Meg from the depths of the veil in which she had shrouded herself like a nun sick of the world.

depths - profundidades; profundidad

veil - velo, velar

shrouded - encubierto; mortaja

nun - monja, religiosa

"I like good strong words that mean something," replied Jo, catching her hat as it took a leap off her head preparatory to flying away altogether.

flying away - salir/irse volando, emprender el vuelo

"Call yourself any names you like, but I am neither a rascal nor a wretch and I don't choose to be called so."

rascal - granuja; pícaro, bribón, canalla

wretch - desgraciado, miserable

"You're a blighted being, and decidedly cross today because you can't sit in the lap of luxury all the time. Poor dear, just wait till I make my fortune, and you shall revel in carriages and ice cream and high-heeled slippers, and posies, and red-headed boys to dance with."

blighted - rruinado; mildiu, tizón, mal, plaga

Fortune - fortuna

revel - revelar; deleitarse

carriages - carrozas; coche, carruaje

"How ridiculous you are, Jo!" But Meg laughed at the nonsense and felt better in spite of herself.

ridiculous - ridículo

nonsense - tonterías; tontería, tontada, tontuna, disparate

"Lucky for you I am, for if I put on crushed airs and tried to be dismal, as you do, we should be in a nice state. Thank goodness, I can always find something funny to keep me up. Don't croak any more, but come home jolly, there's a dear."

crushed - aplastado; aplastamiento, enamoramiento, aplastar, destripar

dismal - lúgubre; mísero, miserable, triste, deprimente

Jo gave her sister an encouraging pat on the shoulder as they parted for the day, each going a different way, each hugging her little warm turnover, and each trying to be cheerful in spite of wintry weather, hard work, and the unsatisfied desires of pleasure-loving youth.

Pat - palmadita, caricia

hugging - abrazo, abrazar

turnover - volumen de negocios; cifra de negocios

wintry - invernal

unsatisfied - insatisfecho

desires - deseos; desear, deseo, gana

When Mr. March lost his property in trying to help an unfortunate friend, the two oldest girls begged to be allowed to do something toward their own support, at least. Believing that they could not begin too early to cultivate energy, industry, and independence, their parents consented, and both fell to work with the hearty good will which in spite of all obstacles is sure to succeed at last.

unfortunate - desafortunado, desgraciado

begged - suplicó; pedir

cultivate - cultivar

Independence - independencia

hearty - corazonoso; carinoso, de corazón, cordial, corpulento, nutritivo

obstacles - obstáculos; obstáculo, óbice, traba, estorbo

Margaret found a place as nursery governess and felt rich with her small salary. As she said, she was ˜fond of luxury', and her chief trouble was poverty. She found it harder to bear than the others because she could remember a time when home was beautiful, life full of ease and pleasure, and want of any kind unknown. She tried not to be envious or discontented, but it was very natural that the young girl should long for pretty things, gay friends, accomplishments, and a happy life. At the Kings'she daily saw all she wanted, for the children's older sisters were just out, and Meg caught frequent glimpses of dainty ball dresses and bouquets, heard lively gossip about theaters, concerts, sleighing parties, and merrymakings of all kinds, and saw money lavished on trifles which would have been so precious to her.

nursery - guardería; criadero, casa cuna, semillero, vivero

governess - gobernanta; institutriz

envious - envidioso, receloso

discontented - descontento

accomplishments - logros; logro, éxito

frequent - frecuente

glimpses - atisbos; atisbo, entrever, atisbar, vislumbrar, ojear

dainty - delicado, manoso

ball dresses - vestidos de baile

theaters - teatros; teatro, zona

sleighing - trineo; (sleigh) trineo

merrymakings - festejos; verbena, celebración, fiesta, jolgorio

lavished - rodigado; generoso, pródigo, dadivoso, derrochador

Poor Meg seldom complained, but a sense of injustice made her feel bitter toward everyone sometimes, for she had not yet learned to know how rich she was in the blessings which alone can make life happy.

injustice - injusticia

blessings - bendiciones; bendición

Jo happened to suit Aunt March, who was lame and needed an active person to wait upon her. The childless old lady had offered to adopt one of the girls when the troubles came, and was much offended because her offer was declined. Other friends told the Marches that they had lost all chance of being remembered in the rich old lady's will, but the unworldly Marches only said...

lame - cojo

wait upon - servir a, esperar

childless - sin hijos

adopt - adoptar, ahijar

offended - ofendido; ofender

declined - rechazado; declive, retroceso, decadencia

"We can't give up our girls for a dozen fortunes. Rich or poor, we will keep together and be happy in one another."

fortunes - ortunas; fortuna

The old lady wouldn't speak to them for a time, but happening to meet Jo at a friend's, something in her comical face and blunt manners struck the old lady's fancy, and she proposed to take her for a companion. This did not suit Jo at all, but she accepted the place since nothing better appeared and, to every one's surprise, got on remarkably well with her irascible relative.

blunt - desafilado, despuntado

companion - companero; companero, companera

remarkably - otablemente; extraordinariamente

irascible - irascible, colérico, manoso

There was an occasional tempest, and once Jo marched home, declaring she couldn't bear it longer, but Aunt March always cleared up quickly, and sent for her to come back again with such urgency that she could not refuse, for in her heart she rather liked the peppery old lady.

tempest - tormenta; tempestad, temporal

declaring - declarando; explicar, aclarar, declarar

cleared up - limpiar; despejar(se); aclarar

urgency - urgencia, premura, apremio, perentoriedad

peppery - pimienta; irascible

I suspect that the real attraction was a large library of fine books, which was left to dust and spiders since Uncle March died.

suspect - barruntar, sospechar, sospechoso

Jo remembered the kind old gentleman, who used to let her build railroads and bridges with his big dictionaries, tell her stories about queer pictures in his Latin books, and buy her cards of gingerbread whenever he met her in the street. The dim, dusty room, with the busts staring down from the tall bookcases, the cozy chairs, the globes, and best of all, the wilderness of books in which she could wander where she liked, made the library a region of bliss to her.

Railroads - ferrocarriles; ferrocarril, checkriel

Latin - Latín

gingerbread - pan de jengibre, pan de especias

dim - débil, ténue

dusty - polvoriento

busts - ustos; busto, pecho

bookcases - librerías; estantería, librero, biblioteca

cozy - cómodo, agradable, acogedor

globes - globos; globo, globo terráqueo

wilderness - salvajes; descampado, jungla, maleza, monte

wander - vagar, divagar, errar, deambular, enganar

bliss - euforia, dicha, beatitud

The moment Aunt March took her nap, or was busy with company, Jo hurried to this quiet place, and curling herself up in the easy chair, devoured poetry, romance, history, travels, and pictures like a regular bookworm. But, like all happiness, it did not last long, for as sure as she had just reached the heart of the story, the sweetest verse of a song, or the most perilous adventure of her traveler, a shrill voice called, "Josy-phine!

nap - siesta

devoured - evorado; devorar, jambar

verse - verso; estrofa

most perilous - el más peligroso

shrill - chillón; estridente

phine - Fine

Josy-phine!" and she had to leave her paradise to wind yarn, wash the poodle, or read Belsham's Essays by the hour together.

paradise - el paraíso; paraíso

yarn - hilo, hilado, lana, hilaza, cuento

Poodle - caniche

Jo's ambition was to do something very splendid. What it was, she had no idea as yet, but left it for time to tell her, and meanwhile, found her greatest affliction in the fact that she couldn't read, run, and ride as much as she liked. A quick temper, sharp tongue, and restless spirit were always getting her into scrapes, and her life was a series of ups and downs, which were both comic and pathetic.

affliction - aflicción, tribulación, quebranto

comic - cómico, cómico, comediante, cómic, tebeo, historieta

pathetic - patético, penoso

But the training she received at Aunt March's was just what she needed, and the thought that she was doing something to support herself made her happy in spite of the perpetual "Josy-phine!"

perpetual - perpetua; perpetuo

Beth was too bashful to go to school. It had been tried, but she suffered so much that it was given up, and she did her lessons at home with her father. Even when he went away, and her mother was called to devote her skill and energy to Soldiers'Aid Societies, Beth went faithfully on by herself and did the best she could. She was a housewifely little creature, and helped Hannah keep home neat and comfortable for the workers, never thinking of any reward but to be loved. Long, quiet days she spent, not lonely nor idle, for her little world was peopled with imaginary friends, and she was by nature a busy bee. There were six dolls to be taken up and dressed every morning, for Beth was a child still and loved her pets as well as ever. Not one whole or handsome one among them, all were outcasts till Beth took them in, for when her sisters outgrew these idols, they passed to her because Amy would have nothing old or ugly. Beth cherished them all the more tenderly for that very reason, and set up a hospital for infirm dolls.

devote - devota; dedicar

aid - ayuda, auxilio

housewifely - amas de casa

creature - criatura

Workers - trabajadores; trabajador, obrero, obrera

Reward - recompensa

dolls - munecas; muneca

outcasts - excluidos; paria

outgrew - uperó; crecer más que

idols - ídolos; ídolo

cherished - apreciado; mimar

infirm - enfermo; enfermizo, endeble, inseguro

No pins were ever stuck into their cotton vitals, no harsh words or blows were ever given them, no neglect ever saddened the heart of the most repulsive, but all were fed and clothed, nursed and caressed with an affection which never failed. One forlorn fragment of dollanity had belonged to Jo and, having led a tempestuous life, was left a wreck in the rag bag, from which dreary poorhouse it was rescued by Beth and taken to her refuge. Having no top to its head, she tied on a neat little cap, and as both arms and legs were gone, she hid these deficiencies by folding it in a blanket and devoting her best bed to this chronic invalid. If anyone had known the care lavished on that dolly, I think it would have touched their hearts, even while they laughed. She brought it bits of bouquets, she read to it, took it out to breathe fresh air, hidden under her coat, she sang it lullabies and never went to bed without kissing its dirty face and whispering tenderly, "I hope you'll have a good night, my poor dear."

vitals - vitales; vital

harsh - áspero, duro, severo, despotricar

neglect - descuido; descuidar, negligir, desoír, hacer caso omiso

saddened - apenar, entristecer, contristar

most repulsive - el más repulsivo

caressed - Te importa

forlorn - abandonado, desamparado, desesperado

fragment - fragmento, fragmentar

dollanity - Munequidad

tempestuous - tempestuoso, proceloso

dreary - aburrido, triste

rescued - rescatado; rescatar, rescate

deficiencies - deficiencias; deficiencia, déficit, deficiencia

blanket - manta, capa, general

devoting - dedicación; dedicar

chronic - crónico

invalid - nulo, inválido, no válido

Dolly - muneca

lullabies - nanas; canción de cuna, nana, canto de cuna, arrullo

Beth had her troubles as well as the others, and not being an angel but a very human little girl, she often ˜wept a little weep'as Jo said, because she couldn't take music lessons and have a fine piano. She loved music so dearly, tried so hard to learn, and practiced away so patiently at the jingling old instrument, that it did seem as if someone (not to hint Aunt March) ought to help her.

wept - lloró; llorar

weep - llorar

patiently - pacientemente

jingling - tintineo, retintín, sintonía

hint - insinuación; pista, indicio, indirecta, buscapié, toque

Nobody did, however, and nobody saw Beth wipe the tears off the yellow keys, that wouldn't keep in tune, when she was all alone. She sang like a little lark about her work, never was too tired for Marmee and the girls, and day after day said hopefully to herself, "I know I'll get my music some time, if I'm good."

wipe - limpiar

hopefully - esperamos; ojalá, Dios te oiga

There are many Beths in the world, shy and quiet, sitting in corners till needed, and living for others so cheerfully that no one sees the sacrifices till the little cricket on the hearth stops chirping, and the sweet, sunshiny presence vanishes, leaving silence and shadow behind.

chirping - trino, chirrido, trinar, chirriar, grillar

sunshiny - brillante

vanishes - desvanecerse, desaparecer, anularse

shadow - sombra

If anybody had asked Amy what the greatest trial of her life was, she would have answered at once, "My nose.

trial - proceso, juicio

When she was a baby, Jo had accidently dropped her into the coal hod, and Amy insisted that the fall had ruined her nose forever. It was not big nor red, like poor ˜Petrea's', it was only rather flat, and all the pinching in the world could not give it an aristocratic point. No one minded it but herself, and it was doing its best to grow, but Amy felt deeply the want of a Grecian nose, and drew whole sheets of handsome ones to console herself.

accidently - Accidentalmente

insisted - insistió; insistir

ruined - arruinado; ruina, desbaratar, arruinar, estropear, dar al traste

pinching - Pellizcos; (pinch); pellizcar, repizcar, afanar, chorizar

deeply - profundamente; a fondo

Grecian - Griego

console - consolar

"Little Raphael," as her sisters called her, had a decided talent for drawing, and was never so happy as when copying flowers, designing fairies, or illustrating stories with queer specimens of art. Her teachers complained that instead of doing her sums she covered her slate with animals, the blank pages of her atlas were used to copy maps on, and caricatures of the most ludicrous description came fluttering out of all her books at unlucky moments. She got through her lessons as well as she could, and managed to escape reprimands by being a model of deportment.

illustrating - ilustrando; ilustrar

specimens - especímenes; espécimen, ejemplar

sums - suma

caricatures - caricaturas; caricatura, caricaturizar, caricaturar

ludicrous - irrisorio, ridículo, disparatado, descabellado

fluttering - agitación; ondear, aletear

unlucky - mala suerte; desafortunado

reprimands - reprimendas; reprimenda, reprensión, amonestación, admonición

deportment - Comportamiento

She was a great favorite with her mates, being good-tempered and possessing the happy art of pleasing without effort. Her little airs and graces were much admired, so were her accomplishments, for besides her drawing, she could play twelve tunes, crochet, and read French without mispronouncing more than two-thirds of the words. She had a plaintive way of saying, "When Papa was rich we did so-and-so," which was very touching, and her long words were considered ˜perfectly elegant'by the girls.

mates - companeros; aparear, acoplar

tempered - templado; temperamento, temple, templar, temperar, atemperar

possessing - poseer

airs and graces - delirios de grandeza

tunes - sintonías; melodía, tonada, afinar, sintonizar

mispronouncing - pronuncias mal; pronunciar mal

plaintive - planidera; morrinoso, melancólico, triste, nostálgico

Amy was in a fair way to be spoiled, for everyone petted her, and her small vanities and selfishnesses were growing nicely. One thing, however, rather quenched the vanities. She had to wear her cousin's clothes. Now Florence's mama hadn't a particle of taste, and Amy suffered deeply at having to wear a red instead of a blue bonnet, unbecoming gowns, and fussy aprons that did not fit.

selfishnesses - goísmos; egoísmo

quenched - apagado; saciar, apagar, templar

Florence - Florencia

mama - mama, mamá

aprons - delantales; delantal, mandil

Everything was good, well made, and little worn, but Amy's artistic eyes were much afflicted, especially this winter, when her school dress was a dull purple with yellow dots and no trimming.

artistic - artístico

afflicted - fligido; afligir

trimming - Recorte; (trim); recortar, orlar, ribetear

"My only comfort," she said to Meg, with tears in her eyes, "is that Mother doesn't take tucks in my dresses whenever I'm naughty, as Maria Parks's mother does. My dear, it's really dreadful, for sometimes she is so bad her frock is up to her knees, and she can't come to school. When I think of this deggerredation, I feel that I can bear even my flat nose and purple gown with yellow sky-rockets on it."

tucks - doblados; pliegue

Maria - María; (Marion) María

frock - vestido

deggerredation - Degeneración

rockets - cohetes; cohete

Meg was Amy's confidant and monitor, and by some strange attraction of opposites Jo was gentle Beth's.

confidant - confidente

monitor - monitor, controlar, monitorear, monitorizar

To Jo alone did the shy child tell her thoughts, and over her big harum-scarum sister Beth unconsciously exercised more influence than anyone in the family. The two older girls were a great deal to one another, but each took one of the younger sisters into her keeping and watched over her in her own way, ˜playing mother'they called it, and put their sisters in the places of discarded dolls with the maternal instinct of little women.

thoughts - pensamientos; pensamiento

scarum - Escarum

discarded - descartado; desechar, descartar

maternal instinct - Instinto maternal

"Has anybody got anything to tell? It's been such a dismal day I'm really dying for some amusement," said Meg, as they sat sewing together that evening.

dying - Muriendo; (dye) Muriendo

sewing - Coser; (sew) Coser

"I had a queer time with Aunt today, and, as I got the best of it, I'll tell you about it," began Jo, who dearly loved to tell stories. "I was reading that everlasting Belsham, and droning away as I always do, for Aunt soon drops off, and then I take out some nice book, and read like fury till she wakes up.

droning - zumbido; zángano

fury - furia

I actually made myself sleepy, and before she began to nod, I gave such a gape that she asked me what I meant by opening my mouth wide enough to take the whole book in at once."

gape - grabape; boquear, abrirse

"I wish I could, and be done with it," said I, trying not to be saucy.

Saucy - picante; travieso, pícaro

"Then she gave me a long lecture on my sins, and told me to sit and think them over while she just ˜lost'herself for a moment. She never finds herself very soon, so the minute her cap began to bob like a top-heavy dahlia, I whipped the Vicar of Wakefield out of my pocket, and read away, with one eye on him and one on Aunt.

sins - pecados; pecado

Bob - Beto

dahlia - dalia

whipped - batido; fusta, látigo, flagelo, panish: t-needed

Vicar - vicario, vicaria

I'd just got to where they all tumbled into the water when I forgot and laughed out loud. Aunt woke up and, being more good-natured after her nap, told me to read a bit and show what frivolous work I preferred to the worthy and instructive Belsham. I did my very best, and she liked it, though she only said...

good-natured - (good-natured) Buen carácter, buena gente

frivolous - frívolo, banal, nimio, trivial

worthy - Digno

instructive - informativo, instructivo, aleccionador

"˜I don't understand what it's all about. Go back and begin it, child.'"

"Back I went, and made the Primroses as interesting as ever I could. Once I was wicked enough to stop in a thrilling place, and say meekly, ˜I'm afraid it tires you, ma'am. Shan't I stop now?'"

primroses - prímulas; primavera

wicked - malvado, cruel, insoportable; (wick) malvado, cruel

meekly - dócilmente; mansamente

tires - neumático

"She caught up her knitting, which had dropped out of her hands, gave me a sharp look through her specs, and said, in her short way, ˜Finish the chapter, and don't be impertinent, miss'."

specs - especificaciones

"Did she own she liked it?" asked Meg.

"Oh, bless you, no! But she let old Belsham rest, and when I ran back after my gloves this afternoon, there she was, so hard at the Vicar that she didn't hear me laugh as I danced a jig in the hall because of the good time coming. What a pleasant life she might have if only she chose! I don't envy her much, in spite of her money, for after all rich people have about as many worries as poor ones, I think," added Jo.

jig - giga

"That reminds me," said Meg, "that I've got something to tell. It isn't funny, like Jo's story, but I thought about it a good deal as I came home. At the Kings'today I found everybody in a flurry, and one of the children said that her oldest brother had done something dreadful, and Papa had sent him away. I heard Mrs. King crying and Mr. King talking very loud, and Grace and Ellen turned away their faces when they passed me, so I shouldn't see how red and swollen their eyes were.

flurry - ráfaga, frenesí

swollen - inflamado; hinchar(se), inflar(se)

I didn't ask any questions, of course, but I felt so sorry for them and was rather glad I hadn't any wild brothers to do wicked things and disgrace the family."

disgrace - desgracia, baldón, deshonrar

"I think being disgraced in school is a great deal tryinger than anything bad boys can do," said Amy, shaking her head, as if her experience of life had been a deep one. "Susie Perkins came to school today with a lovely red carnelian ring. I wanted it dreadfully, and wished I was her with all my might. Well, she drew a picture of Mr. Davis, with a monstrous nose and a hump, and the words, ˜Young ladies, my eye is upon you!

disgraced - deshonrado; desgracia, baldón, deshonrar

tryinger - Intentador

carnelian - cornelina; cornalina

ring - anillo

monstrous - monstruoso

hump - joroba, corcova, giba, cochar, montarse, cochar; montarse

coming out of his mouth in a balloon thing. We were laughing over it when all of a sudden his eye was on us, and he ordered Susie to bring up her slate. She was parrylized with fright, but she went, and oh, what do you think he did? He took her by the ear"the ear! Just fancy how horrid!"and led her to the recitation platform, and made her stand there half an hour, holding the slate so everyone could see."

balloon - globo, vejiga, bomba

parrylized - parrilizado

fright - miedo; susto

recitation - recitación

"Didn't the girls laugh at the picture?" asked Jo, who relished the scrape.

relished - disfrutaba; saborear

"Laugh? Not one! They sat still as mice, and Susie cried quarts, I know she did. I didn't envy her then, for I felt that millions of carnelian rings wouldn't have made me happy after that. I never, never should have got over such a agonizing mortification." And Amy went on with her work, in the proud consciousness of virtue and the successful utterance of two long words in a breath.

rings - anillos; anillo

agonizing - agonizante; agonizar

mortification - Mortificación

consciousness - conciencia

virtue - virtud

utterance - Expresión

"I saw something I liked this morning, and I meant to tell it at dinner, but I forgot," said Beth, putting Jo's topsy-turvy basket in order as she talked. "When I went to get some oysters for Hannah, Mr. Laurence was in the fish shop, but he didn't see me, for I kept behind the fish barrel, and he was busy with Mr. Cutter the fish-man. A poor woman came in with a pail and a mop, and asked Mr. Cutter if he would let her do some scrubbing for a bit of fish, because she hadn't any dinner for her children, and had been disappointed of a day's work.

Oysters - ostras; ostra, ostra, tumba

barrel - barril, tonel, canón, cano, embarrilar

pail - cubo

mop - fregona; chascona, fregar

Mr. Cutter was in a hurry and said ˜No', rather crossly, so she was going away, looking hungry and sorry, when Mr. Laurence hooked up a big fish with the crooked end of his cane and held it out to her. She was so glad and surprised she took it right into her arms, and thanked him over and over. He told her to ˜go along and cook it', and she hurried off, so happy! Wasn't it good of him? Oh, she did look so funny, hugging the big, slippery fish, and hoping Mr. Laurence's bed in heaven would be ˜aisy'."

crossly - En forma de cruz

hooked - enganchado; gancho, garfio, enganchar

crooked - Corrupto; (crook) Corrupto

cane - canón; cana, bastón, bastón blanco

slippery - resbaladizo, escurridizo, resbaloso

Heaven - el cielo; cielo, firmamento, paraíso

When they had laughed at Beth's story, they asked their mother for one, and after a moments thought, she said soberly, "As I sat cutting out blue flannel jackets today at the rooms, I felt very anxious about Father, and thought how lonely and helpless we should be, if anything happened to him.

cutting out - extraer; cortar; eliminar

flannel - panela; franela

anxious - ansioso, inquieto, deseoso

helpless - desamparado; indefenso, incapaz

It was not a wise thing to do, but I kept on worrying till an old man came in with an order for some clothes. He sat down near me, and I began to talk to him, for he looked poor and tired and anxious.

wise - sabio

"˜Have you sons in the army?'I asked, for the note he brought was not to me."

"Yes, ma'am. I had four, but two were killed, one is a prisoner, and I'm going to the other, who is very sick in a Washington hospital.'he answered quietly."

Washington - Washington

"˜You have done a great deal for your country, sir,'I said, feeling respect now, instead of pity."

pity - compasión, piedad, lástima, pena, tener lástima

"˜Not a mite more than I ought, ma'am. I'd go myself, if I was any use. As I ain't, I give my boys, and give 'em free.'"

mite - ácaro

"He spoke so cheerfully, looked so sincere, and seemed so glad to give his all, that I was ashamed of myself. I'd given one man and thought it too much, while he gave four without grudging them. I had all my girls to comfort me at home, and his last son was waiting, miles away, to say good-by to him, perhaps!

sincere - sincero

good-by - (good-by) bueno hasta; adiós

I felt so rich, so happy thinking of my blessings, that I made him a nice bundle, gave him some money, and thanked him heartily for the lesson he had taught me."

"Tell another story, Mother, one with a moral to it, like this. I like to think about them afterward, if they are real and not too preachy," said Jo, after a minute's silence.

moral - moral, moraleja

preachy - Predicador

Mrs. March smiled and began at once, for she had told stories to this little audience for many years, and knew how to please them.

"Once upon a time, there were four girls, who had enough to eat and drink and wear, a good many comforts and pleasures, kind friends and parents who loved them dearly, and yet they were not contented." (Here the listeners stole sly looks at one another, and began to sew diligently.) "These girls were anxious to be good and made many excellent resolutions, but they did not keep them very well, and were constantly saying, ˜If only we had this,'or ˜If we could only do that,'quite forgetting how much they already had, and how many things they actually could do.

comforts - comodidades; comodidad, consuelo, confortar

sly - astuto, pillo, listo, habilidoso

sew - coser

diligently - con diligencia; diligentemente, con esmero

resolutions - resoluciones; resolución, panish: t-needed

constantly - constantemente

So they asked an old woman what spell they could use to make them happy, and she said, ˜When you feel discontented, think over your blessings, and be grateful.'" (Here Jo looked up quickly, as if about to speak, but changed her mind, seeing that the story was not done yet.)

think over - piensa en ello

"Being sensible girls, they decided to try her advice, and soon were surprised to see how well off they were. One discovered that money couldn't keep shame and sorrow out of rich people's houses, another that, though she was poor, she was a great deal happier, with her youth, health, and good spirits, than a certain fretful, feeble old lady who couldn't enjoy her comforts, a third that, disagreeable as it was to help get dinner, it was harder still to go begging for it and the fourth, that even carnelian rings were not so valuable as good behavior.

shame - vergüenza, pena

sorrow - pena; tristeza, aflicción, infelicidad, pesar

fretful - inquieta; irritable, grunón

feeble - débil, endeble, feble, deficiente

go begging - mendigar; sobrar; estar vacante, no quererlo nadie

behavior - comportamiento, conducta, proceder

So they agreed to stop complaining, to enjoy the blessings already possessed, and try to deserve them, lest they should be taken away entirely, instead of increased, and I believe they were never disappointed or sorry that they took the old woman's advice."

possessed - poseído; poseer

deserve - merecer, meritar

"Now, Marmee, that is very cunning of you to turn our own stories against us, and give us a sermon instead of a romance!" cried Meg.

cunning - astucia; astuto

sermon - sermón

"I like that kind of sermon. It's the sort Father used to tell us," said Beth thoughtfully, putting the needles straight on Jo's cushion.

straight on - directamente

cushion - cojín, almohadón, colchón, amortiguante, banda, amortiguar

"I don't complain near as much as the others do, and I shall be more careful than ever now, for I've had warning from Susie's downfall," said Amy morally.

Downfall - caída; ocaso, declive, decaimiento, decadencia

morally - moralmente

"We needed that lesson, and we won't forget it. If we do so, you just say to us, as old Chloe did in Uncle Tom, ˜Tink ob yer marcies, chillen!'˜Tink ob yer marcies!'" added Jo, who could not, for the life of her, help getting a morsel of fun out of the little sermon, though she took it to heart as much as any of them.

morsel - un bocado; pizca, porción, gota

CHAPTER FIVE. BEING NEIGHBORLY

neighborly - vecinos; amigable, sociable

"What in the world are you going to do now, Jo?" asked Meg one snowy afternoon, as her sister came tramping through the hall, in rubber boots, old sack, and hood, with a broom in one hand and a shovel in the other.

tramping - paseando; (tramp); vagabundo, vagabunda, golfa, ramera, puta

rubber - caucho, goma

sack - saco

broom - una escoba; escoba

shovel - pala, traspalar, palear

"Going out for exercise," answered Jo with a mischievous twinkle in her eyes.

mischievous - pícaro, travieso

Twinkle - titilar, fulgurar, refulgir

"I should think two long walks this morning would have been enough! It's cold and dull out, and I advise you to stay warm and dry by the fire, as I do," said Meg with a shiver.

shiver - tiritando; temblar, tiritar, estremecerse

"Never take advice! Can't keep still all day, and not being a pussycat, I don't like to doze by the fire. I like adventures, and I'm going to find some."

pussycat - Gatito

doze - dormir; dormitar

Meg went back to toast her feet and read Ivanhoe, and Jo began to dig paths with great energy. The snow was light, and with her broom she soon swept a path all round the garden, for Beth to walk in when the sun came out and the invalid dolls needed air. Now, the garden separated the Marches'house from that of Mr. Laurence. Both stood in a suburb of the city, which was still country-like, with groves and lawns, large gardens, and quiet streets. A low hedge parted the two estates. On one side was an old, brown house, looking rather bare and shabby, robbed of the vines that in summer covered its walls and the flowers, which then surrounded it.

dig - cavar

suburb - afueras, arrabal, suburbio, extrarradio

groves - arboledas; arboleda

lawns - céspedes; césped

hedge - cobertura; seto

estates - incas; propiedad, inmueble, bien, estamento, finca

robbed - robado; robar

surrounded - rodeado; circundar, envolver, cercar, rodear

On the other side was a stately stone mansion, plainly betokening every sort of comfort and luxury, from the big coach house and well-kept grounds to the conservatory and the glimpses of lovely things one caught between the rich curtains.

mansion - mansión, casoplón

conservatory - conservatorio; invernadero

Yet it seemed a lonely, lifeless sort of house, for no children frolicked on the lawn, no motherly face ever smiled at the windows, and few people went in and out, except the old gentleman and his grandson.

lifeless - exánime, sin vida, inánime

frolicked - etozaba; juguetear, retozar, jugueteo

lawn - césped

To Jo's lively fancy, this fine house seemed a kind of enchanted palace, full of splendors and delights which no one enjoyed. She had long wanted to behold these hidden glories, and to know the Laurence boy, who looked as if he would like to be known, if he only knew how to begin.

enchanted - encantado; encantar

splendors - esplendores; esplendor

delights - elicias; deleite, regocijo, delicia, placer

behold - contemplar, mirar, observar, he aquí, mirad

glories - glorias; gloria

Since the party, she had been more eager than ever, and had planned many ways of making friends with him, but he had not been seen lately, and Jo began to think he had gone away, when she one day spied a brown face at an upper window, looking wistfully down into their garden, where Beth and Amy were snow-balling one another.

more eager - más ansioso

making friends - hacer amigos

lately - últimamente

spied - espiado; espía, chivato, espiar

wistfully - con nostalgia

"That boy is suffering for society and fun," she said to herself. "His grandpa does not know what's good for him, and keeps him shut up all alone. He needs a party of jolly boys to play with, or somebody young and lively. I've a great mind to go over and tell the old gentleman so!"

The idea amused Jo, who liked to do daring things and was always scandalizing Meg by her queer performances. The plan of ˜going over'was not forgotten. And when the snowy afternoon came, Jo resolved to try what could be done. She saw Mr. Lawrence drive off, and then sallied out to dig her way down to the hedge, where she paused and took a survey.

daring - atrevido, audaz, osado; (dare); atrevido, audaz, osado

scandalizing - Escandalizar

sallied - salió; salida

All quiet, curtains down at the lower windows, servants out of sight, and nothing human visible but a curly black head leaning on a thin hand at the upper window.

visible - visible

"There he is," thought Jo, "Poor boy! All alone and sick this dismal day. It's a shame! I'll toss up a snowball and make him look out, and then say a kind word to him."

toss - tiro, lanzamiento, lanzar una moneda al aire, echar un volado

snowball - bola de nieve

Up went a handful of soft snow, and the head turned at once, showing a face which lost its listless look in a minute, as the big eyes brightened and the mouth began to smile. Jo nodded and laughed, and flourished her broom as she called out...

handful - manojo, punado, checkmanojo, poca cantidad

listless - lánguido; apático, indiferente

nodded - asintió; asentir, cabecear, cabezada

flourished - loreció; florecer, prosperar, ademanes, floritura, floreo

"How do you do? Are you sick?"

Laurie opened the window, and croaked out as hoarsely as a raven...

raven - cuervo

"Better, thank you. I've had a bad cold, and been shut up a week."

"I'm sorry. What do you amuse yourself with?"

"Nothing. It's dull as tombs up here."

tombs - tumbas; tumba

"Don't you read?"

"Not much. They won't let me."

"Can't somebody read to you?"

"Grandpa does sometimes, but my books don't interest him, and I hate to ask Brooke all the time."

"Have someone come and see you then."

"There isn't anyone I'd like to see. Boys make such a row, and my head is weak."

"Isn't there some nice girl who'd read and amuse you? Girls are quiet and like to play nurse."

"Don't know any."

"You know us," began Jo, then laughed and stopped.

"So I do! Will you come, please?" cried Laurie.

"I'm not quiet and nice, but I'll come, if Mother will let me. I'll go ask her. Shut the window, like a good boy, and wait till I come."

With that, Jo shouldered her broom and marched into the house, wondering what they would all say to her. Laurie was in a flutter of excitement at the idea of having company, and flew about to get ready, for as Mrs. March said, he was ˜a little gentleman', and did honor to the coming guest by brushing his curly pate, putting on a fresh color, and trying to tidy up the room, which in spite of half a dozen servants, was anything but neat.

flutter - leteo; ondear, aletear

tidy up - Ordenar

Presently there came a loud ring, then a decided voice, asking for ˜Mr. Laurie', and a surprised-looking servant came running up to announce a young lady.

"All right, show her up, it's Miss Jo," said Laurie, going to the door of his little parlor to meet Jo, who appeared, looking rosy and quite at her ease, with a covered dish in one hand and Beth's three kittens in the other.

"Here I am, bag and baggage," she said briskly. "Mother sent her love, and was glad if I could do anything for you. Meg wanted me to bring some of her blanc mange, she makes it very nicely, and Beth thought her cats would be comforting. I knew you'd laugh at them, but I couldn't refuse, she was so anxious to do something."

baggage - equipaje

mange - sarna, rona

It so happened that Beth's funny loan was just the thing, for in laughing over the kits, Laurie forgot his bashfulness, and grew sociable at once.

loan - préstamo

kits - kits; equipo

sociable - comerciable, gregario

"That looks too pretty to eat," he said, smiling with pleasure, as Jo uncovered the dish, and showed the blanc mange, surrounded by a garland of green leaves, and the scarlet flowers of Amy's pet geranium.

uncovered - descubierto; destapar

scarlet - escarlata, escarlatina

geranium - geranio

"It isn't anything, only they all felt kindly and wanted to show it. Tell the girl to put it away for your tea. It's so simple you can eat it, and being soft, it will slip down without hurting your sore throat. What a cozy room this is!"

slip down - deslizarse hacia abajo; resbalar

sore throat - dolor de garganta

"It might be if it was kept nice, but the maids are lazy, and I don't know how to make them mind. It worries me though."

"I'll right it up in two minutes, for it only needs to have the hearth brushed, so"and the things made straight on the mantelpiece, so"and the books put here, and the bottles there, and your sofa turned from the light, and the pillows plumped up a bit. Now then, you're fixed."

mantelpiece - mantel; repisa

plumped - relleno, regordete, rechoncho

And so he was, for, as she laughed and talked, Jo had whisked things into place and given quite a different air to the room. Laurie watched her in respectful silence, and when she beckoned him to his sofa, he sat down with a sigh of satisfaction, saying gratefully...

respectful - respetuoso

"How kind you are! Yes, that's what it wanted. Now please take the big chair and let me do something to amuse my company."

"No, I came to amuse you. Shall I read aloud?" and Jo looked affectionately toward some inviting books near by.

affectionately - carinosamente; afectuosamente

"Thank you! I've read all those, and if you don't mind, I'd rather talk," answered Laurie.

"Not a bit. I'll talk all day if you'll only set me going. Beth says I never know when to stop."

"Is Beth the rosy one, who stays at home good deal and sometimes goes out with a little basket?" asked Laurie with interest.

"Yes, that's Beth. She's my girl, and a regular good one she is, too."

"The pretty one is Meg, and the curly-haired one is Amy, I believe?"

"How did you find that out?"

Laurie colored up, but answered frankly, "Why, you see I often hear you calling to one another, and when I'm alone up here, I can't help looking over at your house, you always seem to be having such good times. I beg your pardon for being so rude, but sometimes you forget to put down the curtain at the window where the flowers are. And when the lamps are lighted, it's like looking at a picture to see the fire, and you all around the table with your mother.

frankly - francamente

beg - pedir limosna; pedir

Her face is right opposite, and it looks so sweet behind the flowers, I can't help watching it. I haven't got any mother, you know." And Laurie poked the fire to hide a little twitching of the lips that he could not control.

twitching - Tic; (twitch) Tic

The solitary, hungry look in his eyes went straight to Jo's warm heart. She had been so simply taught that there was no nonsense in her head, and at fifteen she was as innocent and frank as any child. Laurie was sick and lonely, and feeling how rich she was in home and happiness, she gladly tried to share it with him. Her face was very friendly and her sharp voice unusually gentle as she said...

solitary - solitario

frank - franco

"We'll never draw that curtain any more, and I give you leave to look as much as you like. I just wish, though, instead of peeping, you'd come over and see us. Mother is so splendid, she'd do you heaps of good, and Beth would sing to you if I begged her to, and Amy would dance. Meg and I would make you laugh over our funny stage properties, and we'd have jolly times. Wouldn't your grandpa let you?"

peeping - espiando; espiar

heaps - montones; pila, montón, cúmulo, montículo, checkpila, amontonar

stage properties - propiedades del escenario

"I think he would, if your mother asked him. He's very kind, though he does not look so, and he lets me do what I like, pretty much, only he's afraid I might be a bother to strangers," began Laurie, brightening more and more.

strangers - Extrano

"We are not strangers, we are neighbors, and you needn't think you'd be a bother. We want to know you, and I've been trying to do it this ever so long. We haven't been here a great while, you know, but we have got acquainted with all our neighbors but you."

"You see, Grandpa lives among his books, and doesn't mind much what happens outside. Mr. Brooke, my tutor, doesn't stay here, you know, and I have no one to go about with me, so I just stop at home and get on as I can."

"That's bad. You ought to make an effort and go visiting everywhere you are asked, then you'll have plenty of friends, and pleasant places to go to. Never mind being bashful. It won't last long if you keep going."

Laurie turned red again, but wasn't offended at being accused of bashfulness, for there was so much good will in Jo it was impossible not to take her blunt speeches as kindly as they were meant.

accused - acusado; acusar, denunciar

"Do you like your school?" asked the boy, changing the subject, after a little pause, during which he stared at the fire and Jo looked about her, well pleased.

pause - receso, checkdescanso, pausar, interrumpir, suspender

"Don't go to school, I'm a businessman"girl, I mean. I go to wait on my great-aunt, and a dear, cross old soul she is, too," answered Jo.

Laurie opened his mouth to ask another question, but remembering just in time that it wasn't manners to make too many inquiries into people's affairs, he shut it again, and looked uncomfortable.

affairs - asuntos; negocio, asunto, rollo, amorío, aventura

Jo liked his good breeding, and didn't mind having a laugh at Aunt March, so she gave him a lively description of the fidgety old lady, her fat poodle, the parrot that talked Spanish, and the library where she reveled.

breeding - Cría; (breed); criar, procrear, aparearse, cultivar, engendrar

fidgety - Inquieta

parrot - papagayo, loro, cotorra

Spanish - espanol; espanol, castellano, espanol, castellano, hispano

reveled - revelado; deleitarse

Laurie enjoyed that immensely, and when she told about the prim old gentleman who came once to woo Aunt March, and in the middle of a fine speech, how Poll had tweaked his wig off to his great dismay, the boy lay back and laughed till the tears ran down his cheeks, and a maid popped her head in to see what was the matter.

woo - cortejar

Poll - encuesta; elecciones, votación

tweaked - ajustado; retocar, retoque

wig - peluca

dismay - espanto, estupefacción, consternación

"Oh! That does me no end of good. Tell on, please," he said, taking his face out of the sofa cushion, red and shining with merriment.

sofa cushion - cojín de sofá

merriment - alegría, júbilo, regocijo, juguetoneo

Much elated with her success, Jo did ˜tell on', all about their plays and plans, their hopes and fears for Father, and the most interesting events of the little world in which the sisters lived. Then they got to talking about books, and to Jo's delight, she found that Laurie loved them as well as she did, and had read even more than herself.

elated - feliz

"If you like them so much, come down and see ours. Grandfather is out, so you needn't be afraid," said Laurie, getting up.

"I'm not afraid of anything," returned Jo, with a toss of the head.

"I don't believe you are!" exclaimed the boy, looking at her with much admiration, though he privately thought she would have good reason to be a trifle afraid of the old gentleman, if she met him in some of his moods.

admiration - admiración

privately - en privado; privadamente

"What richness!" sighed Jo, sinking into the depth of a velour chair and gazing about her with an air of intense satisfaction. "Theodore Laurence, you ought to be the happiest boy in the world," she added impressively.

depth - profundidad

velour - terciopelo; velour, velvetón, velúr

gazing - mirando; observar, mirar fijamente

intense - intenso

impressively - impresionantemente

"A fellow can't live on books," said Laurie, shaking his head as he perched on a table opposite.

Before he could say more, a bell rang, and Jo flew up, exclaiming with alarm, "Mercy me! It's your grandpa!"

"Well, what if it is? You are not afraid of anything, you know," returned the boy, looking wicked.

"I think I am a little bit afraid of him, but I don't know why I should be. Marmee said I might come, and I don't think you're any the worse for it," said Jo, composing herself, though she kept her eyes on the door.

composing - componiendo; componer, constituir, conformar, constar

"I'm a great deal better for it, and ever so much obliged. I'm only afraid you are very tired of talking to me. It was so pleasant, I couldn't bear to stop," said Laurie gratefully.

obliged - obligado; obligar

"The doctor to see you, sir," and the maid beckoned as she spoke.

"Would you mind if I left you for a minute? I suppose I must see him," said Laurie.

"Don't mind me. I'm happy as a cricket here," answered Jo.

Laurie went away, and his guest amused herself in her own way. She was standing before a fine portrait of the old gentleman when the door opened again, and without turning, she said decidedly, "I'm sure now that I shouldn't be afraid of him, for he's got kind eyes, though his mouth is grim, and he looks as if he had a tremendous will of his own. He isn't as handsome as my grandfather, but I like him."

grim - asqueroso; horrible, horroroso, macabro, nefasto

tremendous - tremendo

"Thank you, ma'am," said a gruff voice behind her, and there, to her great dismay, stood old Mr. Laurence.

Poor Jo blushed till she couldn't blush any redder, and her heart began to beat uncomfortably fast as she thought what she had said. For a minute a wild desire to run away possessed her, but that was cowardly, and the girls would laugh at her, so she resolved to stay and get out of the scrape as she could. A second look showed her that the living eyes, under the bushy eyebrows, were kinder even than the painted ones, and there was a sly twinkle in them, which lessened her fear a good deal.

blush - sonrojo, rubor

uncomfortably - incómodo; incómodamente

desire - desear, deseo, gana

possessed - Posees

cowardly - cobarde, cobardemente

bushy - tupido, poblado

lessened - isminuido; menoscabar, disminuir, reducir, aminorar

The gruff voice was gruffer than ever, as the old gentleman said abruptly, after the dreadful pause, "So you're not afraid of me, hey?"

gruffer - gruffer; ronco

abruptly - de repente; abruptamente, precipitadamente

"Not much, sir."

"And you don't think me as handsome as your grandfather?"

"Not quite, sir."

"And I've got a tremendous will, have I?"

"I only said I thought so."

"But you like me in spite of it?"

"Yes, I do, sir."

That answer pleased the old gentleman. He gave a short laugh, shook hands with her, and, putting his finger under her chin, turned up her face, examined it gravely, and let it go, saying with a nod, "You've got your grandfather's spirit, if you haven't his face. He was a fine man, my dear, but what is better, he was a brave and an honest one, and I was proud to be his friend."

chin - barbilla, mentón

gravely - gravemente

"Thank you, sir," And Jo was quite comfortable after that, for it suited her exactly.

"What have you been doing to this boy of mine, hey?" was the next question, sharply put.

sharply - Agudamente

"Only trying to be neighborly, sir." And Jo told how her visit came about.

"You think he needs cheering up a bit, do you?"

cheering - animando; viva, hurra

"Yes, sir, he seems a little lonely, and young folks would do him good perhaps. We are only girls, but we should be glad to help if we could, for we don't forget the splendid Christmas present you sent us," said Jo eagerly.

"Tut, tut, tut! That was the boy's affair. How is the poor woman?"

affair - negocio, asunto, rollo, amorío, aventura

"Doing nicely, sir." And off went Jo, talking very fast, as she told all about the Hummels, in whom her mother had interested richer friends than they were.

"Just her father's way of doing good. I shall come and see your mother some fine day. Tell her so. There's the tea bell, we have it early on the boy's account. Come down and go on being neighborly."

"If you'd like to have me, sir."

"Shouldn't ask you, if I didn't." And Mr. Laurence offered her his arm with old-fashioned courtesy.

courtesy - cortesía, de cortesía

"What would Meg say to this?" thought Jo, as she was marched away, while her eyes danced with fun as she imagined herself telling the story at home.

"Hey! Why, what the dickens has come to the fellow?" said the old gentleman, as Laurie came running downstairs and brought up with a start of surprise at the astounding sight of Jo arm in arm with his redoubtable grandfather.

astounding - asombroso; asombrar, pasmar

"I didn't know you'd come, sir," he began, as Jo gave him a triumphant little glance.

triumphant - triunfante, triunfador

glance - mirada; ojear, echar un vistazo, mirar, pispear, vistazo

"That's evident, by the way you racket downstairs. Come to your tea, sir, and behave like a gentleman." And having pulled the boy's hair by way of a caress, Mr. Laurence walked on, while Laurie went through a series of comic evolutions behind their backs, which nearly produced an explosion of laughter from Jo.

caress - caricia, carantona, acariciar

evolutions - evoluciones; evolución

The old gentleman did not say much as he drank his four cups of tea, but he watched the young people, who soon chatted away like old friends, and the change in his grandson did not escape him. There was color, light, and life in the boy's face now, vivacity in his manner, and genuine merriment in his laugh.

vivacity - vivacidad

genuine - genuino, auténtico, legítimo, verdadero

"She's right, the lad is lonely. I'll see what these little girls can do for him," thought Mr. Laurence, as he looked and listened. He liked Jo, for her odd, blunt ways suited him, and she seemed to understand the boy almost as well as if she had been one herself.

If the Laurences had been what Jo called ˜prim and poky', she would not have got on at all, for such people always made her shy and awkward. But finding them free and easy, she was so herself, and made a good impression. When they rose she proposed to go, but Laurie said he had something more to show her, and took her away to the conservatory, which had been lighted for her benefit. It seemed quite fairylike to Jo, as she went up and down the walks, enjoying the blooming walls on either side, the soft light, the damp sweet air, and the wonderful vines and trees that hung about her, while her new friend cut the finest flowers till his hands were full.

awkward - torpe, desmanado, embarazoso, delicado, incómodo, tímido

fairylike - de hadas

blooming - floreciendo; flor

damp - húmedo, humedad, amortiguar

hung about - frecuentar, esperar

Then he tied them up, saying, with the happy look Jo liked to see, "Please give these to your mother, and tell her I like the medicine she sent me very much."

They found Mr. Laurence standing before the fire in the great drawing room, but Jo's attention was entirely absorbed by a grand piano, which stood open.

grand piano - Piano de cola

stood open - estar abierto

"Do you play?" she asked, turning to Laurie with a respectful expression.

"Sometimes," he answered modestly.

"Please do now. I want to hear it, so I can tell Beth."

"Won't you first?"

"Don't know how. Too stupid to learn, but I love music dearly."

So Laurie played and Jo listened, with her nose luxuriously buried in heliotrope and tea roses. Her respect and regard for the ˜Laurence'boy increased very much, for he played remarkably well and didn't put on any airs. She wished Beth could hear him, but she did not say so, only praised him till he was quite abashed, and his grandfather came to his rescue.

luxuriously - lujosamente

heliotrope - heliotropo

regard - respecto a; considerar

Praised - elogiado; alabanza, loa, enaltecimiento, elogio, adoración

"That will do, that will do, young lady. Too many sugarplums are not good for him. His music isn't bad, but I hope he will do as well in more important things. Going? well, I'm much obliged to you, and I hope You'll come again. My respects to your mother. Good night, Doctor Jo."

sugarplums - Caramelo

You'll come - Vendrás

He shook hands kindly, but looked as if something did not please him. When they got into the hall, Jo asked Laurie if she had said something amiss. He shook his head.

amiss - algún problema; mal

"No, it was me. He doesn't like to hear me play."

"Why not?"

"I'll tell you some day. John is going home with you, as I can't."

"No need of that. I am not a young lady, and it's only a step. Take care of yourself, won't you?"

"Yes, but you will come again, I hope?"

"If you promise to come and see us after you are well."

"I will."

"Good night, Laurie!"

"Good night, Jo, good night!"

When all the afternoon's adventures had been told, the family felt inclined to go visiting in a body, for each found something very attractive in the big house on the other side of the hedge. Mrs. March wanted to talk of her father with the old man who had not forgotten him, Meg longed to walk in the conservatory, Beth sighed for the grand piano, and Amy was eager to see the fine pictures and statues.

"Mother, why didn't Mr. Laurence like to have Laurie play?" asked Jo, who was of an inquiring disposition.

inquiring - preguntando; investigar, informarse

disposition - disposición; inclinación, temperamento, carácter

"I am not sure, but I think it was because his son, Laurie's father, married an Italian lady, a musician, which displeased the old man, who is very proud. The lady was good and lovely and accomplished, but he did not like her, and never saw his son after he married. They both died when Laurie was a little child, and then his grandfather took him home. I fancy the boy, who was born in Italy, is not very strong, and the old man is afraid of losing him, which makes him so careful.

accomplished - cumplido; efectuar, realizar, lograr, completar

Laurie comes naturally by his love of music, for he is like his mother, and I dare say his grandfather fears that he may want to be a musician. At any rate, his skill reminds him of the woman he did not like, and so he ˜glowered'as Jo said."

glowered - glowered; mirar con el ceno fruncido

"Dear me, how romantic!" exclaimed Meg.

"How silly!" said Jo. "Let him be a musician if he wants to, and not plague his life out sending him to college, when he hates to go."

"That's why he has such handsome black eyes and pretty manners, I suppose. Italians are always nice," said Meg, who was a little sentimental.

"What do you know about his eyes and his manners? You never spoke to him, hardly," cried Jo, who was not sentimental.

"I saw him at the party, and what you tell shows that he knows how to behave. That was a nice little speech about the medicine Mother sent him."

"He meant the blanc mange, I suppose."

"How stupid you are, child! He meant you, of course."

"Did he?" And Jo opened her eyes as if it had never occurred to her before.

"I never saw such a girl! You don't know a compliment when you get it," said Meg, with the air of a young lady who knew all about the matter.

compliment - cumplido, felicitar, cumplimentar

"I think they are great nonsense, and I'll thank you not to be silly and spoil my fun. Laurie's a nice boy and I like him, and I won't have any sentimental stuff about compliments and such rubbish. We'll all be good to him because he hasn't got any mother, and he may come over and see us, mayn't he, Marmee?"

"Yes, Jo, your little friend is very welcome, and I hope Meg will remember that children should be children as long as they can."

"I don't call myself a child, and I'm not in my teens yet," observed Amy. "What do you say, Beth?"

teens - adolescentes; Adolescente

"I was thinking about our ˜Pilgrim's Progress'," answered Beth, who had not heard a word. "How we got out of the Slough and through the Wicket Gate by resolving to be good, and up the steep hill by trying, and that maybe the house over there, full of splendid things, is going to be our Palace Beautiful."

wicket - ventanilla

resolving - resolviendo; tomar la decisión de, resolver

steep - mpinada; empinado

"We have got to get by the lions first," said Jo, as if she rather liked the prospect.

prospect - prospecto; perspectiva, vista, panorama, expectativa, prospectar

CHAPTER SIX. BETH FINDS THE PALACE BEAUTIFUL

The big house did prove a Palace Beautiful, though it took some time for all to get in, and Beth found it very hard to pass the lions. Old Mr. Laurence was the biggest one, but after he had called, said something funny or kind to each one of the girls, and talked over old times with their mother, nobody felt much afraid of him, except timid Beth. The other lion was the fact that they were poor and Laurie rich, for this made them shy of accepting favors which they could not return.

But, after a while, they found that he considered them the benefactors, and could not do enough to show how grateful he was for Mrs. March's motherly welcome, their cheerful society, and the comfort he took in that humble home of theirs. So they soon forgot their pride and interchanged kindnesses without stopping to think which was the greater.

benefactors - enefactores; bienhechor, benefactor

pride - orgullo, soberbia, cachondez, toriondez, verriondez, manada

interchanged - intercambiado; intercambiar, reemplazar, intercambio

kindnesses - ondades; amabilidad, bondad

All sorts of pleasant things happened about that time, for the new friendship flourished like grass in spring. Every one liked Laurie, and he privately informed his tutor that "the Marches were regularly splendid girls." With the delightful enthusiasm of youth, they took the solitary boy into their midst and made much of him, and he found something very charming in the innocent companionship of these simple-hearted girls.

enthusiasm - entusiasmo

charming - encantador; (charm); encantador

Never having known mother or sisters, he was quick to feel the influences they brought about him, and their busy, lively ways made him ashamed of the indolent life he led. He was tired of books, and found people so interesting now that Mr. Brooke was obliged to make very unsatisfactory reports, for Laurie was always playing truant and running over to the Marches'.

indolent - indolente

unsatisfactory - insatisfactorio

Truant - truante, novillero, novillera, absentista

running over - derramarse; repasar; Atropellar

"Never mind, let him take a holiday, and make it up afterward," said the old gentleman. "The good lady next door says he is studying too hard and needs young society, amusement, and exercise. I suspect she is right, and that I've been coddling the fellow as if I'd been his grandmother.

coddling - mimos; malcriar, mimar, consentir, cocinar a fuego lento

Let him do what he likes, as long as he is happy. He can't get into mischief in that little nunnery over there, and Mrs. March is doing more for him than we can."

mischief - travesuras; travesura, diablura, gamberrada

nunnery - un convento; convento

What good times they had, to be sure. Such plays and tableaux, such sleigh rides and skating frolics, such pleasant evenings in the old parlor, and now and then such gay little parties at the great house.

tableaux - tableaux; cuadro, retablo, cuadro vivo

sleigh - trineo

Meg could walk in the conservatory whenever she liked and revel in bouquets, Jo browsed over the new library voraciously, and convulsed the old gentleman with her criticisms, Amy copied pictures and enjoyed beauty to her heart's content, and Laurie played ˜lord of the manor'in the most delightful style.

browsed - buscado; navegar

voraciously - vorazmente

convulsed - convulsiones; convulsionar, crispar

criticisms - críticas; crítica

Lord - senor; castellano, senor

Manor - mansión; finca

most delightful - más encantador

But Beth, though yearning for the grand piano, could not pluck up courage to go to the ˜Mansion of Bliss', as Meg called it. She went once with Jo, but the old gentleman, not being aware of her infirmity, stared at her so hard from under his heavy eyebrows, and said "Hey!" so loud, that he frightened her so much her ˜feet chattered on the floor', she never told her mother, and she ran away, declaring she would never go there any more, not even for the dear piano. No persuasions or enticements could overcome her fear, till, the fact coming to Mr. Laurence's ear in some mysterious way, he set about mending matters. During one of the brief calls he made, he artfully led the conversation to music, and talked away about great singers whom he had seen, fine organs he had heard, and told such charming anecdotes that Beth found it impossible to stay in her distant corner, but crept nearer and nearer, as if fascinated. At the back of his chair she stopped and stood listening, with her great eyes wide open and her cheeks red with excitement of this unusual performance. Taking no more notice of her than if she had been a fly, Mr.

yearning - Anhelo; (yearn) Anhelo

pluck - herir, desplumar, perseverancia

courage - coraje, valor, valentía

infirmity - enfermedad

chattered - charló; chacharear, parlotear

persuasions - persuasiones; persuasión

enticements - atracción

overcome - vencer, superar

mending - Reparando; (mend); remiendo, remendar, reparar

brief - breve, corto, conciso, sucinto, escueto, resumen, poner al tanto

organs - órganos; órgano, publicación oficial

anecdotes - anécdotas; anécdota, chascarrillo

distant - distante, a distancia, hurano, remoto

fascinated - fascinado; fascinar

Laurence talked on about Laurie's lessons and teachers. And presently, as if the idea had just occurred to him, he said to Mrs. March...

"The boy neglects his music now, and I'm glad of it, for he was getting too fond of it. But the piano suffers for want of use. Wouldn't some of your girls like to run over, and practice on it now and then, just to keep it in tune, you know, ma'am?"

neglects - descuidar, negligir, desoír, hacer caso omiso

Beth took a step forward, and pressed her hands tightly together to keep from clapping them, for this was an irresistible temptation, and the thought of practicing on that splendid instrument quite took her breath away. Before Mrs. March could reply, Mr. Laurence went on with an odd little nod and smile...

tightly - con fuerza; herméticamente

irresistible - irresistible

temptation - tentación

"They needn't see or speak to anyone, but run in at any time. For I'm shut up in my study at the other end of the house, Laurie is out a great deal, and the servants are never near the drawing room after nine o'clock."

Here he rose, as if going, and Beth made up her mind to speak, for that last arrangement left nothing to be desired. "Please, tell the young ladies what I say, and if they don't care to come, why, never mind." Here a little hand slipped into his, and Beth looked up at him with a face full of gratitude, as she said, in her earnest yet timid way...

desired - deseado; desear, deseo, gana

gratitude - gratitud

"Oh sir, they do care, very very much!"

"Are you the musical girl?" he asked, without any startling "Hey!" as he looked down at her very kindly.

startling - sorprendente, alarmante; (startle); sobresaltarse, alarmarse

"I'm Beth. I love it dearly, and I'll come, if you are quite sure nobody will hear me, and be disturbed," she added, fearing to be rude, and trembling at her own boldness as she spoke.

boldness - audacia; osadía

"Not a soul, my dear. The house is empty half the day, so come and drum away as much as you like, and I shall be obliged to you."

be obliged - estar obligado

"How kind you are, sir!"

Beth blushed like a rose under the friendly look he wore, but she was not frightened now, and gave the hand a grateful squeeze because she had no words to thank him for the precious gift he had given her. The old gentleman softly stroked the hair off her forehead, and, stooping down, he kissed her, saying, in a tone few people ever heard...

squeeze - exprimir, apretar, apretujar, apuro, crisis, apretón

stroked - acariciado; golpe

stooping - inclinarse, agacharse

"I had a little girl once, with eyes like these. God bless you, my dear! Good day, madam." And away he went, in a great hurry.

madam - senora; senora, cabrona

Beth had a rapture with her mother, and then rushed up to impart the glorious news to her family of invalids, as the girls were not home. How blithely she sang that evening, and how they all laughed at her because she woke Amy in the night by playing the piano on her face in her sleep.

impart - impartir

glorious - glorioso

invalids - inválidos; nulo, inválido, no válido

Next day, having seen both the old and young gentleman out of the house, Beth, after two or three retreats, fairly got in at the side door, and made her way as noiselessly as any mouse to the drawing room where her idol stood. Quite by accident, of course, some pretty, easy music lay on the piano, and with trembling fingers and frequent stops to listen and look about, Beth at last touched the great instrument, and straightway forgot her fear, herself, and everything else but the unspeakable delight which the music gave her, for it was like the voice of a beloved friend.

retreats - retiros; retirarse, batirse en retirada

idol - ídolo

straightway - De inmediato

beloved - querida; amado, querido, bienamado

She stayed till Hannah came to take her home to dinner, but she had no appetite, and could only sit and smile upon everyone in a general state of beatitude.

appetite - apetito, deseo, ganas

After that, the little brown hood slipped through the hedge nearly every day, and the great drawing room was haunted by a tuneful spirit that came and went unseen. She never knew that Mr. Laurence opened his study door to hear the old-fashioned airs he liked. She never saw Laurie mount guard in the hall to warn the servants away. She never suspected that the exercise books and new songs which she found in the rack were put there for her especial benefit, and when he talked to her about music at home, she only thought how kind he was to tell things that helped her so much.

haunted - hechizado; frecuentar, espantar, desasosegar, inquietar

unseen - No se ve

mount - montar

suspected - sospechas; barruntar, sospechar, sospechoso

rack - estante

So she enjoyed herself heartily, and found, what isn't always the case, that her granted wish was all she had hoped. Perhaps it was because she was so grateful for this blessing that a greater was given her. At any rate she deserved both.

granted - concedido; otorgar, conceder, subvención, beca, patrocinio

"Mother, I'm going to work Mr. Laurence a pair of slippers. He is so kind to me, I must thank him, and I don't know any other way. Can I do it?" asked Beth, a few weeks after that eventful call of his.

eventful - evento; memorable

"Yes, dear. It will please him very much, and be a nice way of thanking him. The girls will help you about them, and I will pay for the making up," replied Mrs. March, who took peculiar pleasure in granting Beth's requests because she so seldom asked anything for herself.

peculiar - particular; peculiar, raro, específico

granting - otorgar, conceder, subvención, beca, patrocinio

After many serious discussions with Meg and Jo, the pattern was chosen, the materials bought, and the slippers begun. A cluster of grave yet cheerful pansies on a deeper purple ground was pronounced very appropriate and pretty, and Beth worked away early and late, with occasional lifts over hard parts. She was a nimble little needlewoman, and they were finished before anyone got tired of them.

cluster - amontonamiento, agrupamiento, aglomeración, racimo, cúmulo

grave - tumba

pansies - margaritas; pensamiento

appropriate - es apropiado; apropiado, adecuado, aduenarse, designar

nimble - diestro, ágil, hábil, despierto

needlewoman - Mujer de aguja

Then she wrote a short, simple note, and with Laurie's help, got them smuggled onto the study table one morning before the old gentleman was up.

smuggled - contrabandear, pasar de contrabando

When this excitement was over, Beth waited to see what would happen. All day passed and a part of the next before any acknowledgement arrived, and she was beginning to fear she had offended her crochety friend. On the afternoon of the second day, she went out to do an errand, and give poor Joanna, the invalid doll, her daily exercise.

acknowledgement - reconocimiento, muestra de agradecimiento

crochety - Grochety

errand - recado

doll - muneca

As she came up the street, on her return, she saw three, yes, four heads popping in and out of the parlor windows, and the moment they saw her, several hands were waved, and several joyful voices screamed...

screamed - gritó; grito, gritar

"Here's a letter from the old gentleman! Come quick, and read it!"

"Oh, Beth, he's sent you..." began Amy, gesticulating with unseemly energy, but she got no further, for Jo quenched her by slamming down the window.

unseemly - ndecoroso; inapropiado, extemporal, extemporáneo, impropio

slamming - Golpeando; (slam) Golpeando

Beth hurried on in a flutter of suspense. At the door her sisters seized and bore her to the parlor in a triumphal procession, all pointing and all saying at once, "look there! Look there!" Beth did look, and turned pale with delight and surprise, for there stood a little cabinet piano, with a letter lying on the glossy lid, directed like a sign board to "Miss Elizabeth March."

suspense - suspenso; suspense

seized - incautado; agarrar, apoderarse de, apresar, aferrar, tomar

triumphal procession - Desfile triunfal

look there - mira allí

cabinet - armario, gabinete, vestidor, consejo

glossy - brillante, lustroso, reluciente

lid - tapa

"For me?" gasped Beth, holding onto Jo and feeling as if she should tumble down, it was such an overwhelming thing altogether.

gasped - jadeó; jadear, bocanada, calada

overwhelming - avasallador; agobiar, abrumar, checkagobiar

"Yes, all for you, my precious! Isn't it splendid of him? Don't you think he's the dearest old man in the world? Here's the key in the letter. We didn't open it, but we are dying to know what he says," cried Jo, hugging her sister and offering the note.

offering - ofrenda; ofrecimiento; (offer) ofrenda; ofrecimiento

"You read it! I can't, I feel so queer! Oh, it is too lovely!" and Beth hid her face in Jo's apron, quite upset by her present.

apron - delantal, mandil

Jo opened the paper and began to laugh, for the first words she saw were...

"Miss March: "Dear Madam""

"How nice it sounds! I wish someone would write to me so!" said Amy, who thought the old-fashioned address very elegant.

"˜I have had many pairs of slippers in my life, but I never had any that suited me so well as yours,'" continues Jo. "˜Heart's-ease is my favorite flower, and these will always remind me of the gentle giver. I like to pay my debts, so I know you will allow ˜the old gentleman'to send you something which once belonged to the little grand daughter he lost.

debts - deudas; deuda, pufo

With hearty thanks and best wishes, I remain "˜Your grateful friend and humble servant, ˜JAMES LAURENCE'."

James - Santiago, Jacobo, Yago, Jaime

"There, Beth, that's an honor to be proud of, I'm sure! Laurie told me how fond Mr. Laurence used to be of the child who died, and how he kept all her little things carefully. Just think, he's given you her piano. That comes of having big blue eyes and loving music," said Jo, trying to soothe Beth, who trembled and looked more excited than she had ever been before.

soothe - calmar, serenar, aliviar, aliviarse, descansar

trembled - tembló; tiritar, temblar, temblor, vibración, temblequera

more excited - Más emocionado/ entusiasmado

"See the cunning brackets to hold candles, and the nice green silk, puckered up, with a gold rose in the middle, and the pretty rack and stool, all complete," added Meg, opening the instrument and displaying its beauties.

brackets - soportes; paréntesis, corchete

candles - velas; vela, candela, cirio

puckered - puckered; arrugar, arruga

stool - heces; taburete

displaying - mostrando; espectáculo, exposición, monitor, expositor

"˜Your humble servant, James Laurence'. Only think of his writing that to you. I'll tell the girls. They'll think it's splendid," said Amy, much impressed by the note.

"Try it, honey. Let's hear the sound of the baby pianny," said Hannah, who always took a share in the family joys and sorrows.

honey - carino; miel, dulzura, carino, tesoro, cielo

sorrows - enas; tristeza, aflicción, infelicidad, pesar

So Beth tried it, and everyone pronounced it the most remarkable piano ever heard. It had evidently been newly tuned and put in apple-pie order, but, perfect as it was, I think the real charm lay in the happiest of all happy faces which leaned over it, as Beth lovingly touched the beautiful black and white keys and pressed the bright pedals.

remarkable - notable, remarcable, destacable

newly - recién; nuevamente

tuned - sintonizado; melodía, tonada, afinar, sintonizar

in apple-pie order - en orden perfecto

charm - encanto

lovingly - con carino; amorosamente

pedals - pedales; pedal, pedalear

"You'll have to go and thank him," said Jo, by way of a joke, for the idea of the child's really going never entered her head.

"Yes, I mean to. I guess I'll go now, before I get frightened thinking about it." And, to the utter amazement of the assembled family, Beth walked deliberately down the garden, through the hedge, and in at the Laurences'door.

get frightened - Asustarse

utter - totalmente; absoluto, total

assembled - montado; ensamblar, construir, montar, reunir, juntar

deliberately - deliberadamente, concienzudamente

"Well, I wish I may die if it ain't the queerest thing I ever see! The pianny has turned her head! She'd never have gone in her right mind," cried Hannah, staring after her, while the girls were rendered quite speechless by the miracle.

queerest - queerest; raro, extrano, trucha, marica, maricón

rendered - rendido; dejar, volver

miracle - milagro

They would have been still more amazed if they had seen what Beth did afterward. If you will believe me, she went and knocked at the study door before she gave herself time to think, and when a gruff voice called out, "come in!" she did go in, right up to Mr. Laurence, who looked quite taken aback, and held out her hand, saying, with only a small quaver in her voice, "I came to thank you, sir, for.

more amazed - más sorprendido

knocked at - Golpear, tocar

aback - atrapado; desconcertado

." But she didn't finish, for he looked so friendly that she forgot her speech and, only remembering that he had lost the little girl he loved, she put both arms round his neck and kissed him.

If the roof of the house had suddenly flown off, the old gentleman wouldn't have been more astonished. But he liked it. Oh, dear, yes, he liked it amazingly! And was so touched and pleased by that confiding little kiss that all his crustiness vanished, and he just set her on his knee, and laid his wrinkled cheek against her rosy one, feeling as if he had got his own little granddaughter back again.

astonished - asombrado; asombrar, sorprender, pasmar

amazingly - extraordinariamente, increíblemente, asombrosamente

confiding - confiar

little kiss - un besito

crustiness - crujiente

wrinkled - arrugado; arruga

granddaughter - nieta

Beth ceased to fear him from that moment, and sat there talking to him as cozily as if she had known him all her life, for love casts out fear, and gratitude can conquer pride. When she went home, he walked with her to her own gate, shook hands cordially, and touched his hat as he marched back again, looking very stately and erect, like a handsome, soldierly old gentleman, as he was.

ceased - esado; cesar, parar, terminar

cozily - Acogedoramente

casts - lances; moldear, elenco, castear, sondar, sondear, lanzar

cordially - cordialmente

erect - erecto, erguido

soldierly - Soldado

When the girls saw that performance, Jo began to dance a jig, by way of expressing her satisfaction, Amy nearly fell out of the window in her surprise, and Meg exclaimed, with up-lifted hands, "Well, I do believe the world is coming to an end."

CHAPTER SEVEN. AMY'S VALLEY OF HUMILIATION

humiliation - humillación, humillación

"That boy is a perfect cyclops, isn't he?" said Amy one day, as Laurie clattered by on horseback, with a flourish of his whip as he passed.

cyclops - cíclope

clattered - golpeado; trapalear

horseback - a caballo

flourish - florecer, prosperar, ademanes, floritura, floreo, ornamento

whip - fusta, látigo, flagelo, panish: t-needed

"How dare you say so, when he's got both his eyes? And very handsome ones they are, too," cried Jo, who resented any slighting remarks about her friend.

resented - resentido; ofenderse, tomarse a mal

slighting - desprecio; insignificante, leve, ligero, falta de respeto

remarks - observaciones; observación, comentario

"I didn't say anything about his eyes, and I don't see why you need fire up when I admire his riding."

"Oh, my goodness! That little goose means a centaur, and she called him a Cyclops," exclaimed Jo, with a burst of laughter.

centaur - centauro

"You needn't be so rude, it's only a ˜lapse of lingy', as Mr. Davis says," retorted Amy, finishing Jo with her Latin. "I just wish I had a little of the money Laurie spends on that horse," she added, as if to herself, yet hoping her sisters would hear.

lapse - lapso, desliz, prescripción

retorted - replicó; replicar

"Why?" asked Meg kindly, for Jo had gone off in another laugh at Amy's second blunder.

blunder - una metedura de pata; error

"I need it so much. I'm dreadfully in debt, and it won't be my turn to have the rag money for a month."

debt - deuda, pufo

rag - trapo

"In debt, Amy? What do you mean?" And Meg looked sober.

"Why, I owe at least a dozen pickled limes, and I can't pay them, you know, till I have money, for Marmee forbade my having anything charged at the shop."

owe - deber, adeudar, estar en deuda

pickled - en escabeche; encurtido

limes - limas; cal

forbade - prohibido; prohibir, vedar, vetar, negar

"Tell me all about it. Are limes the fashion now? It used to be pricking bits of rubber to make balls." And Meg tried to keep her countenance, Amy looked so grave and important.

pricking - Pinchando; (prick) Pinchando

countenance - semblante, apariencia, expresión, rostro

"Why, you see, the girls are always buying them, and unless you want to be thought mean, you must do it too. It's nothing but limes now, for everyone is sucking them in their desks in schooltime, and trading them off for pencils, bead rings, paper dolls, or something else, at recess.

schooltime - Hora de ir a la escuela

bead - perla; cuenta, gota

If one girl likes another, she gives her a lime. If she's mad with her, she eats one before her face, and doesn't offer even a suck. They treat by turns, and I've had ever so many but haven't returned them, and I ought for they are debts of honor, you know."

lime - cal

suck - chupar, sorber, ser un asco, dar asco, apestar

"How much will pay them off and restore your credit?" asked Meg, taking out her purse.

restore - restablecer, restaurar

purse - bolsa, monedero, fruncir

"A quarter would more than do it, and leave a few cents over for a treat for you. Don't you like limes?"

"Not much. You may have my share. Here's the money. Make it last as long as you can, for it isn't very plenty, you know."

"Oh, thank you! It must be so nice to have pocket money! I'll have a grand feast, for I haven't tasted a lime this week. I felt delicate about taking any, as I couldn't return them, and I'm actually suffering for one."

delicate - delicado, delicado (1, 2)

Next day Amy was rather late at school, but could not resist the temptation of displaying, with pardonable pride, a moist brown-paper parcel, before she consigned it to the inmost recesses of her desk. During the next few minutes the rumor that Amy March had got twenty-four delicious limes (she ate one on the way) and was going to treat circulated through her ˜set', and the attentions of her friends became quite overwhelming. Katy Brown invited her to her next party on the spot. Mary Kingsley insisted on lending her her watch till recess, and Jenny Snow, a satirical young lady, who had basely twitted Amy upon her limeless state, promptly buried the hatchet and offered to furnish answers to certain appalling sums.

resist - resistir

moist - húmedo

parcel - paquete, parcela, hatajo, embalar, parcelar

consigned - enviado; consignar

inmost - intimo

rumor - rumor, voz, rumorología, habladurías

circulated - distribuido; circular

Mary - María

Jenny - Juanita

satirical - satírico

basely - Básicamente

twitted - twitteado; gilí

promptly - pronto; inmediatamente, rápidamente

hatchet - hacha

furnish - amoblar, amueblar, suministrar, proporcionar, dotar

appalling - spantoso; terrible; horrible; horroroso; onstandard; (appal) spantoso; terrible; horrible; horroroso; onstandard

But Amy had not forgotten Miss Snow's cutting remarks about ˜some persons whose noses were not too flat to smell other people's limes, and stuck-up people who were not too proud to ask for them', and she instantly crushed ˜that Snow girl's'hopes by the withering telegram, "You needn't be so polite all of a sudden, for you won't get any."

stuck-up - (stuck-up) se ha atascado

instantly - al instante, al hilo, al tiro, instantáneamente

telegram - telegrama

A distinguished personage happened to visit the school that morning, and Amy's beautifully drawn maps received praise, which honor to her foe rankled in the soul of Miss Snow, and caused Miss March to assume the airs of a studious young peacock. But, alas, alas! Pride goes before a fall, and the revengeful Snow turned the tables with disastrous success.

distinguished - istinguido; distinguir

personage - personaje

foe - enemigo

assume - suponer, dar por sentado, asumir

peacock - pavo real, pavorreal

revengeful - Venganza

disastrous - desastroso

No sooner had the guest paid the usual stale compliments and bowed himself out, than Jenny, under pretense of asking an important question, informed Mr. Davis, the teacher, that Amy March had pickled limes in her desk.

stale - duro, rancio, seco

bowed - inclinado; inclinar(se), hacer una reverencia

Now Mr. Davis had declared limes a contraband article, and solemnly vowed to publicly ferrule the first person who was found breaking the law. This much-enduring man had succeeded in banishing chewing gum after a long and stormy war, had made a bonfire of the confiscated novels and newspapers, had suppressed a private post office, had forbidden distortions of the face, nicknames, and caricatures, and done all that one man could do to keep half a hundred rebellious girls in order. Boys are trying enough to human patience, goodness knows, but girls are infinitely more so, especially to nervous gentlemen with tyrannical tempers and no more talent for teaching than Dr. Blimber. Mr. Davis knew any quantity of Greek, Latin, algebra, and ologies of all sorts so he was called a fine teacher, and manners, morals, feelings, and examples were not considered of any particular importance.

declared - declarado; explicar, aclarar, declarar

contraband - contrabando

solemnly - solemnemente

vowed - prometido; voto, manda, promesa

publicly - públicamente

ferrule - férula; casquillo, virola

enduring - perdurable; aguantar, perdurar, tolerar, consentir, condescender

banishing - destierro; desterrar

chewing gum - chicle

bonfire - fogata, hoguera

confiscated - confiscado; decomisar, confiscar

suppressed - suprimido; reprimar, contener, ocultar, suprimir

forbidden - prohibido; prohibir, vedar, vetar, negar

distortions - istorsiones; distorsión

nicknames - apodos; apodo, mote, sobrenombre

rebellious - rebelde, levantisco, contestatario

patience - paciencia, solitario

infinitely - infinitamente

tyrannical - tiránico, tirano, de ordeno y mando

tempers - templos; temperamento, temple, templar, temperar, atemperar

Greek - griego, griego, griega

algebra - álgebra

ologies - logía

morals - moral, moraleja

It was a most unfortunate moment for denouncing Amy, and Jenny knew it. Mr. Davis had evidently taken his coffee too strong that morning, there was an east wind, which always affected his neuralgia, and his pupils had not done him the credit which he felt he deserved. Therefore, to use the expressive, if not elegant, language of a schoolgirl, "He was as nervous as a witch and as cross as a bear". The word ˜limes'was like fire to powder, his yellow face flushed, and he rapped on his desk with an energy which made Jenny skip to her seat with unusual rapidity.

most unfortunate - el más desafortunado

denouncing - denunciar

neuralgia - neuralgia

pupils - alumnos; alumno

expressive - expresivo

flushed - enjuagado; rubor

rapped - rapeado; golpe seco

skip - saltar

rapidity - rapidez, celeridad

"Young ladies, attention, if you please!"

At the stern order the buzz ceased, and fifty pairs of blue, black, gray, and brown eyes were obediently fixed upon his awful countenance.

obediently - obedientemente

"Miss March, come to the desk."

Amy rose to comply with outward composure, but a secret fear oppressed her, for the limes weighed upon her conscience.

comply - cumplir, acceder a, acatar

outward - hacia fuera

composure - compostura, entereza

oppressed - primidos; oprimir

conscience - conciencia

"Bring with you the limes you have in your desk," was the unexpected command which arrested her before she got out of her seat.

Command - orden, mandato, mando, comando, dominio

"Don't take all." whispered her neighbor, a young lady of great presence of mind.

Amy hastily shook out half a dozen and laid the rest down before Mr. Davis, feeling that any man possessing a human heart would relent when that delicious perfume met his nose. Unfortunately, Mr. Davis particularly detested the odor of the fashionable pickle, and disgust added to his wrath.

possessing - Posees

relent - ceder; (relend); ceder

perfume - aroma, perfume, perfumar

detested - detestado; detestar

odor - olor

disgust - repugnar, dar asco, asquear, asco, repugnancia

"Is that all?"

"Not quite," stammered Amy.

"Bring the rest immediately."

With a despairing glance at her set, she obeyed.

"You are sure there are no more?"

"I never lie, sir."

"So I see. Now take these disgusting things two by two, and throw them out of the window."

disgusting - asqueroso; repugnar, dar asco, asquear, asco, repugnancia

There was a simultaneous sigh, which created quite a little gust, as the last hope fled, and the treat was ravished from their longing lips. Scarlet with shame and anger, Amy went to and fro six dreadful times, and as each doomed couple, looking oh, so plump and juicy, fell from her reluctant hands, a shout from the street completed the anguish of the girls, for it told them that their feast was being exulted over by the little Irish children, who were their sworn foes.

simultaneous - simultánea; simultáneo

gust - ráfaga, racha

fled - huyó; huir, desvanecerse, checkfugarse

anger - ira, enfado, enojo, rabia

doomed - condenado; condenar, danar

juicy - jugoso

reluctant - renuente, reacio, reluctante, reticente

exulted - exultante; exultar

Irish - irlandés, irlandeses

sworn - jurado; jurar

foes - enemigos; enemigo

This"this was too much. All flashed indignant or appealing glances at the inexorable Davis, and one passionate lime lover burst into tears.

flashed - flasheado; destello

indignant - indignada; indignado

appealing - apetecible; suplicar, rogar

glances - miradas; ojear, echar un vistazo, mirar, pispear, vistazo

inexorable - inexorable

passionate - apasionado

lover - amante

As Amy returned from her last trip, Mr. Davis gave a portentous "Hem!" and said, in his most impressive manner...

portentous - portentoso

hem - dobladillo

"Young ladies, you remember what I said to you a week ago. I am sorry this has happened, but I never allow my rules to be infringed, and I never break my word. Miss March, hold out your hand."

infringed - nfringido; infringir

Amy started, and put both hands behind her, turning on him an imploring look which pleaded for her better than the words she could not utter. She was rather a favorite with ˜old Davis', as, of course, he was called, and it's my private belief that he would have broken his word if the indignation of one irrepressible young lady had not found vent in a hiss.

imploring - implorando; implorar

pleaded for - rogar por

indignation - indignación

irrepressible - irreprimible, irrefrenable

vent - ventilar; respiradero; rejilla de ventilación

hiss - siseo, sisear

That hiss, faint as it was, irritated the irascible gentleman, and sealed the culprit's fate.

irritated - irritado; irritar, enviscar

sealed - sellado; sello

culprit - culpable

fate - destino, azar

"Your hand, Miss March!" was the only answer her mute appeal received, and too proud to cry or beseech, Amy set her teeth, threw back her head defiantly, and bore without flinching several tingling blows on her little palm. They were neither many nor heavy, but that made no difference to her. For the first time in her life she had been struck, and the disgrace, in her eyes, was as deep as if he had knocked her down.

mute - silencio; mudo

beseech - rogar, implorar, suplicar

defiantly - Desafiante

flinching - acojonarse; encogerse, estremecerse

tingling - hormigueo; (tingle); hormigueo

palm - palma

"You will now stand on the platform till recess," said Mr. Davis, resolved to do the thing thoroughly, since he had begun.

thoroughly - cabalmente, a cabalidad, a fondo, detenidamente

That was dreadful. It would have been bad enough to go to her seat, and see the pitying faces of her friends, or the satisfied ones of her few enemies, but to face the whole school, with that shame fresh upon her, seemed impossible, and for a second she felt as if she could only drop down where she stood, and break her heart with crying.

pitying - compasión, piedad, lástima, pena, tener lástima

A bitter sense of wrong and the thought of Jenny Snow helped her to bear it, and, taking the ignominious place, she fixed her eyes on the stove funnel above what now seemed a sea of faces, and stood there, so motionless and white that the girls found it hard to study with that pathetic figure before them.

ignominious - ignominioso

stove - fogón; estufa, cocina, horno; (stave); duela, estrofa

funnel - embudo

motionless - inmóvil, inerte, quieto, en reposo

During the fifteen minutes that followed, the proud and sensitive little girl suffered a shame and pain which she never forgot. To others it might seem a ludicrous or trivial affair, but to her it was a hard experience, for during the twelve years of her life she had been governed by love alone, and a blow of that sort had never touched her before.

sensitive - sensible, sensitivo, susceptible

trivial - trivial

governed - gobernado; gobernar

The smart of her hand and the ache of her heart were forgotten in the sting of the thought, "I shall have to tell at home, and they will be so disappointed in me!"

ache - dolor

sting - picar; aguijón

The fifteen minutes seemed an hour, but they came to an end at last, and the word ˜Recess!'had never seemed so welcome to her before.

"You can go, Miss March," said Mr. Davis, looking, as he felt, uncomfortable.

He did not soon forget the reproachful glance Amy gave him, as she went, without a word to anyone, straight into the anteroom, snatched her things, and left the place "forever," as she passionately declared to herself. She was in a sad state when she got home, and when the older girls arrived, some time later, an indignation meeting was held at once. Mrs. March did not say much but looked disturbed, and comforted her afflicted little daughter in her tenderest manner.

anteroom - antesala

snatched - arrebatado; agarrar, arrebatar, arrancada, arranque

passionately - con pasión; apasionadamente

little daughter - hija pequena

tenderest - más tierno; tierno

Meg bathed the insulted hand with glycerine and tears, Beth felt that even her beloved kittens would fail as a balm for griefs like this, Jo wrathfully proposed that Mr. Davis be arrested without delay, and Hannah shook her fist at the ˜villain'and pounded potatoes for dinner as if she had him under her pestle.

insulted - insultado; insultar, insulto, ofensa, improperio

balm - bálsamo

griefs - duelos; pesar, pesadumbre, dolor, sufrimiento

wrathfully - con ira

pestle - pesto; mano, maneta, maja, macilla

No notice was taken of Amy's flight, except by her mates, but the sharp-eyed demoiselles discovered that Mr. Davis was quite benignant in the afternoon, also unusually nervous.

benignant - Benigno

Just before school closed, Jo appeared, wearing a grim expression as she stalked up to the desk, and delivered a letter from her mother, then collected Amy's property, and departed, carefully scraping the mud from her boots on the door mat, as if she shook the dust of the place off her feet.

scraping - Raspando; (scrap) Raspando

mat - estera, felpudo

"Yes, you can have a vacation from school, but I want you to study a little every day with Beth," said Mrs. March that evening. "I don't approve of corporal punishment, especially for girls. I dislike Mr. Davis's manner of teaching and don't think the girls you associate with are doing you any good, so I shall ask your father's advice before I send you anywhere else."

approve - aprobar; tener un buen concepto de

corporal - cabo

associate - asociado, companero, asociar, frecuentar, alternar, tratar

"That's good! I wish all the girls would leave, and spoil his old school. It's perfectly maddening to think of those lovely limes," sighed Amy, with the air of a martyr.

maddening - enloquecedor; enloquecer

martyr - mártir, martirizar

"I am not sorry you lost them, for you broke the rules, and deserved some punishment for disobedience," was the severe reply, which rather disappointed the young lady, who expected nothing but sympathy.

disobedience - desobediencia

severe - severo, grave, austero

sympathy - simpatía; compasión, empatía, compasión

"Do you mean you are glad I was disgraced before the whole school?" cried Amy.

are glad - estar contento

"I should not have chosen that way of mending a fault," replied her mother, "but I'm not sure that it won't do you more good than a bolder method. You are getting to be rather conceited, my dear, and it is quite time you set about correcting it. You have a good many little gifts and virtues, but there is no need of parading them, for conceit spoils the finest genius. There is not much danger that real talent or goodness will be overlooked long, even if it is, the consciousness of possessing and using it well should satisfy one, and the great charm of all power is modesty.

fault - defecto, falla, culpa, falta

bolder - más audaz; valiente, audaz, atrevido

conceited - envanecido; engreimiento, vanidad, presunción, ego

virtues - irtudes; virtud

parading - desfilando; desfile

spoils - otín; expoliar, despojar, danar, arruinar, echar a perder

overlooked - pasado por alto; mirador, pasar por alto, otear

satisfy - satisfacer

modesty - modestia, pudor

"So it is!" cried Laurie, who was playing chess in a corner with Jo. "I knew a girl once, who had a really remarkable talent for music, and she didn't know it, never guessed what sweet little things she composed when she was alone, and wouldn't have believed it if anyone had told her."

chess - ajedrez

composed - compuesto; componer, constituir, conformar, constar

"I wish I'd known that nice girl. Maybe she would have helped me, I'm so stupid," said Beth, who stood beside him, listening eagerly.

"You do know her, and she helps you better than anyone else could," answered Laurie, looking at her with such mischievous meaning in his merry black eyes that Beth suddenly turned very red, and hid her face in the sofa cushion, quite overcome by such an unexpected discovery.

Jo let Laurie win the game to pay for that praise of her Beth, who could not be prevailed upon to play for them after her compliment. So Laurie did his best, and sang delightfully, being in a particularly lively humor, for to the Marches he seldom showed the moody side of his character. When he was gone, Amy, who had been pensive all evening, said suddenly, as if busy over some new idea, "Is Laurie an accomplished boy?"

prevailed - revaleció; prevalecer, vencer

delightfully - Deliciosamente

moody - de mal humor; temperamental, panish: t-needed

"Yes, he has had an excellent education, and has much talent. He will make a fine man, if not spoiled by petting," replied her mother.

"And he isn't conceited, is he?" asked Amy.

"Not in the least. That is why he is so charming and we all like him so much."

"I see. It's nice to have accomplishments and be elegant, but not to show off or get perked up," said Amy thoughtfully.

perked - percibido; reanimarse

"These things are always seen and felt in a person's manner and conversations, if modestly used, but it is not necessary to display them," said Mrs. March.

display - mostrar; espectáculo, exposición, monitor, expositor

"Any more than it's proper to wear all your bonnets and gowns and ribbons at once, that folks may know you've got them," added Jo, and the lecture ended in a laugh.

bonnets - capós; capucha, gorra, cofia, capota, capó

ribbons - cintas; cinta, mono, lazo, galón

CHAPTER EIGHT. JO MEETS APOLLYON

"Girls, where are you going?" asked Amy, coming into their room one Saturday afternoon, and finding them getting ready to go out with an air of secrecy which excited her curiosity.

secrecy - secreto, sigilo, secretismo

curiosity - curiosidad

"Never mind. Little girls shouldn't ask questions," returned Jo sharply.

Now if there is anything mortifying to our feelings when we are young, it is to be told that, and to be bidden to "run away, dear" is still more trying to us. Amy bridled up at this insult, and determined to find out the secret, if she teased for an hour.

mortifying - mortificante; mortificar, matar

bidden - obligado; pujar, hacer una oferta

bridled - con bridas; brida

teased - se burló; cardar, peinar, burlarse de, molestar, tomar el pelo

Turning to Meg, who never refused her anything very long, she said coaxingly, "Do tell me! I should think you might let me go, too, for Beth is fussing over her piano, and I haven't got anything to do, and am so lonely."

coaxingly - Enganosamente

fussing - molestando; fandango, jaleo, escándalo

"I can't, dear, because you aren't invited," began Meg, but Jo broke in impatiently, "Now, Meg, be quiet or you will spoil it all. You can't go, Amy, so don't be a baby and whine about it."

impatiently - impacientemente

whine - gimoteo, lloriqueo, gimotear, lloriquear, gemir

"You are going somewhere with Laurie, I know you are. You were whispering and laughing together on the sofa last night, and you stopped when I came in. Aren't you going with him?"

"Yes, we are. Now do be still, and stop bothering."

bothering - molestando; molestar, agobiar, cansón, joroba, rayos, caramba

Amy held her tongue, but used her eyes, and saw Meg slip a fan into her pocket.

slip - resbalón; resbalar

"I know! I know! You're going to the theater to see the Seven Castles!" she cried, adding resolutely, "and I shall go, for Mother said I might see it, and I've got my rag money, and it was mean not to tell me in time."

resolutely - Decididamente

"Just listen to me a minute, and be a good child," said Meg soothingly. "Mother doesn't wish you to go this week, because your eyes are not well enough yet to bear the light of this fairy piece. Next week you can go with Beth and Hannah, and have a nice time."

fairy - hada, marica, mujercita

"I don't like that half as well as going with you and Laurie. Please let me. I've been sick with this cold so long, and shut up, I'm dying for some fun. Do, Meg! I'll be ever so good," pleaded Amy, looking as pathetic as she could.

sick with - padecer una enfermedad; enfermo de

pleaded - suplicado; rogar

"Suppose we take her. I don't believe Mother would mind, if we bundle her up well," began Meg.

"If she goes I shan't, and if I don't, Laurie won't like it, and it will be very rude, after he invited only us, to go and drag in Amy. I should think she'd hate to poke herself where she isn't wanted," said Jo crossly, for she disliked the trouble of overseeing a fidgety child when she wanted to enjoy herself.

drag - arrastrar; llevar a rastras

poke - golpear; meter

overseeing - supervisando; supervisar

Her tone and manner angered Amy, who began to put her boots on, saying, in her most aggravating way, "I shall go. Meg says I may, and if I pay for myself, Laurie hasn't anything to do with it."

angered - enfadado; ira, enfado, enojo, rabia

aggravating - agravante; agravar, empeorar, irritar, exasperar, sublevar

"You can't sit with us, for our seats are reserved, and you mustn't sit alone, so Laurie will give you his place, and that will spoil our pleasure. Or he'll get another seat for you, and that isn't proper when you weren't asked. You shan't stir a step, so you may just stay where you are," scolded Jo, crosser than ever, having just pricked her finger in her hurry.

reserved - reservado; reserva, reservar

mustn - No debe

weren - lo eran

pricked - pinchado; pinchar, perforar

Sitting on the floor with one boot on, Amy began to cry and Meg to reason with her, when Laurie called from below, and the two girls hurried down, leaving their sister wailing. For now and then she forgot her grown-up ways and acted like a spoiled child. Just as the party was setting out, Amy called over the banisters in a threatening tone, "You'll be sorry for this, Jo March, see if you ain't."

called over - llamar a alguien

banisters - barandillas; barandilla

"Fiddlesticks!" returned Jo, slamming the door.

They had a charming time, for The Seven Castles Of The Diamond Lake was as brilliant and wonderful as heart could wish. But in spite of the comical red imps, sparkling elves, and the gorgeous princes and princesses, Jo's pleasure had a drop of bitterness in it. The fairy queen's yellow curls reminded her of Amy, and between the acts she amused herself with wondering what her sister would do to make her ˜sorry for it'. She and Amy had had many lively skirmishes in the course of their lives, for both had quick tempers and were apt to be violent when fairly roused. Amy teased Jo, and Jo irritated Amy, and semioccasional explosions occurred, of which both were much ashamed afterward.

imps - imps; diablillo

sparkling - chispeante; centelleante, gaseoso, efervescente

elves - elfos; elfo, duende

bitterness - amargo, amargura, amargor, acíbar

skirmishes - escaramuzas; escaramuza

roused - despertado; despertar

teased - Té

semioccasional - semiocasional

Although the oldest, Jo had the least self-control, and had hard times trying to curb the fiery spirit which was continually getting her into trouble. Her anger never lasted long, and having humbly confessed her fault, she sincerely repented and tried to do better. Her sisters used to say that they rather liked to get Jo into a fury because she was such an angel afterward. Poor Jo tried desperately to be good, but her bosom enemy was always ready to flame up and defeat her, and it took years of patient effort to subdue it.

self-control - (self-control) autocontrol

continually - continuadamente, continuamente

humbly - humildemente

confessed - confesó; confesar, panish: t-needed

sincerely - sinceramente

repented - se arrepintió; arrepentirse

desperately - desesperadamente

flame up - Prenderse fuego; arder, encenderse

defeat - vencer, derrotar

subdue - someter, doblegar, domenar, debelar

When they got home, they found Amy reading in the parlor. She assumed an injured air as they came in, never lifted her eyes from her book, or asked a single question. Perhaps curiosity might have conquered resentment, if Beth had not been there to inquire and receive a glowing description of the play. On going up to put away her best hat, Jo's first look was toward the bureau, for in their last quarrel Amy had soothed her feelings by turning Jo's top drawer upside down on the floor.

assumed - asumido; suponer, dar por sentado, asumir

resentment - resentimiento, animadversión, animosidad, rencor

inquire - preguntar; investigar, informarse

glowing - resplandeciente; fulgir, fulgurar, iluminar, brillar

quarrel - discutir; pelea, rina

soothed - calmado; verdad

top drawer - el cajón más alto

upside - al alza; lado bueno, lado positivo, lado favorable

Everything was in its place, however, and after a hasty glance into her various closets, bags, and boxes, Jo decided that Amy had forgiven and forgotten her wrongs.

closets - armarios; ropero, armario, clóset

forgiven - perdonado; perdonar, disculpar

There Jo was mistaken, for next day she made a discovery which produced a tempest. Meg, Beth, and Amy were sitting together, late in the afternoon, when Jo burst into the room, looking excited and demanding breathlessly, "Has anyone taken my book?"

demanding - exigente; demanda, exigencia, exigir, demandar

breathlessly - Sin aliento

Meg and Beth said, "No." at once, and looked surprised. Amy poked the fire and said nothing. Jo saw her color rise and was down upon her in a minute.

"Amy, you've got it!"

"No, I haven't."

"You know where it is, then!"

"No, I don't."

"That's a fib!" cried Jo, taking her by the shoulders, and looking fierce enough to frighten a much braver child than Amy.

fib - bola, trola, mentirijilla

"It isn't. I haven't got it, don't know where it is now, and don't care."

"You know something about it, and you'd better tell at once, or I'll make you." And Jo gave her a slight shake.

Slight - insignificante, leve, ligero, falta de respeto

"Scold as much as you like, you'll never see your silly old book again," cried Amy, getting excited in her turn.

scold - reganar; reganar, retar, renir

"Why not?"

"I burned it up."

"What! My little book I was so fond of, and worked over, and meant to finish before Father got home? Have you really burned it?" said Jo, turning very pale, while her eyes kindled and her hands clutched Amy nervously.

kindled - encendido; encender

clutched - aferrado; agarrar

nervously - nerviosamente

"Yes, I did! I told you I'd make you pay for being so cross yesterday, and I have, so..."

Amy got no farther, for Jo's hot temper mastered her, and she shook Amy till her teeth chattered in her head, crying in a passion of grief and anger...

hot temper - Mal genio

mastered - ominado; senor, dueno; senora, duena

grief - duelo; pesar, pesadumbre, dolor, sufrimiento

"You wicked, wicked girl! I never can write it again, and I'll never forgive you as long as I live."

forgive - perdonar, disculpar

Meg flew to rescue Amy, and Beth to pacify Jo, but Jo was quite beside herself, and with a parting box on her sister's ear, she rushed out of the room up to the old sofa in the garret, and finished her fight alone.

pacify - pacificar

The storm cleared up below, for Mrs. March came home, and, having heard the story, soon brought Amy to a sense of the wrong she had done her sister. Jo's book was the pride of her heart, and was regarded by her family as a literary sprout of great promise. It was only half a dozen little fairy tales, but Jo had worked over them patiently, putting her whole heart into her work, hoping to make something good enough to print. She had just copied them with great care, and had destroyed the old manuscript, so that Amy's bonfire had consumed the loving work of several years. It seemed a small loss to others, but to Jo it was a dreadful calamity, and she felt that it never could be made up to her. Beth mourned as for a departed kitten, and Meg refused to defend her pet. Mrs.

regarded - considerado; considerar

literary - literaria; literario

sprout - brotar

tales - cuentos; historia, relato

manuscript - manuscrito, manuscrito

calamity - calamidad, panish: t-needed

mourned - lamentar, estar de luto

defend - defender

March looked grave and grieved, and Amy felt that no one would love her till she had asked pardon for the act which she now regretted more than any of them.

grieved - penado; afligirse, acongojarse

regretted - te arrepientes; lamentar, pena, pesar, arrepentimiento

When the tea bell rang, Jo appeared, looking so grim and unapproachable that it took all Amy's courage to say meekly...

"Please forgive me, Jo. I'm very, very sorry."

"I never shall forgive you," was Jo's stern answer, and from that moment she ignored Amy entirely.

No one spoke of the great trouble, not even Mrs. March, for all had learned by experience that when Jo was in that mood words were wasted, and the wisest course was to wait till some little accident, or her own generous nature, softened Jo's resentment and healed the breach. It was not a happy evening, for though they sewed as usual, while their mother read aloud from Bremer, Scott, or Edgeworth, something was wanting, and the sweet home peace was disturbed.

by experience - por experiencia

wisest - el más sabio; sabio

healed - curado; curar

breach - brecha, violación, batería, boquete, disolución, quebrada

sewed - cosido; coser

They felt this most when singing time came, for Beth could only play, Jo stood dumb as a stone, and Amy broke down, so Meg and Mother sang alone. But in spite of their efforts to be as cheery as larks, the flutelike voices did not seem to chord as well as usual, and all felt out of tune.

dumb - tonto; mudo

larks - alondras; alondra

flutelike - como una flauta

chord - acorde, cuerda

As Jo received her good-night kiss, Mrs. March whispered gently, "My dear, don't let the sun go down upon your anger. Forgive each other, help each other, and begin again tomorrow."

Jo wanted to lay her head down on that motherly bosom, and cry her grief and anger all away, but tears were an unmanly weakness, and she felt so deeply injured that she really couldn't quite forgive yet. So she winked hard, shook her head, and said gruffly because Amy was listening, "It was an abominable thing, and she doesn't deserve to be forgiven."

weakness - debilidad, flaqueza, punto débil, debilidad por, carino

winked - guinó el ojo; guinar el ojo

gruffly - Groseramente

abominable - abominable, aborrecible

With that she marched off to bed, and there was no merry or confidential gossip that night.

confidential - confidencial

Amy was much offended that her overtures of peace had been repulsed, and began to wish she had not humbled herself, to feel more injured than ever, and to plume herself on her superior virtue in a way which was particularly exasperating. Jo still looked like a thunder cloud, and nothing went well all day.

overtures - ofertas; obertura

repulsed - repulsado; repulsar

humbled - humillado; humilde

plume - pluma

exasperating - exasperante; exasperar

thunder - trueno, estruendo, fragor, tronar

It was bitter cold in the morning, she dropped her precious turnover in the gutter, Aunt March had an attack of the fidgets, Meg was sensitive, Beth would look grieved and wistful when she got home, and Amy kept making remarks about people who were always talking about being good and yet wouldn't even try when other people set them a virtuous example.

gutter - arroyo, cuneta, canal, canalón

fidgets - fidgets; revolverse

virtuous - virtuoso

"Everybody is so hateful, I'll ask Laurie to go skating. He is always kind and jolly, and will put me to rights, I know," said Jo to herself, and off she went.

hateful - odioso, detestable

Amy heard the clash of skates, and looked out with an impatient exclamation.

clash - chocar; estruendo, escaramuza

impatient - impaciente

"There! She promised I should go next time, for this is the last ice we shall have. But it's no use to ask such a crosspatch to take me."

crosspatch - Parche cruzado

"Don't say that. You were very naughty, and it is hard to forgive the loss of her precious little book, but I think she might do it now, and I guess she will, if you try her at the right minute," said Meg. "Go after them. Don't say anything till Jo has got good-natured with Laurie, than take a quiet minute and just kiss her, or do some kind thing, and I'm sure she'll be friends again with all her heart."

"I'll try," said Amy, for the advice suited her, and after a flurry to get ready, she ran after the friends, who were just disappearing over the hill.

It was not far to the river, but both were ready before Amy reached them. Jo saw her coming, and turned her back. Laurie did not see, for he was carefully skating along the shore, sounding the ice, for a warm spell had preceded the cold snap.

shore - oribera; costa, playa

preceded - precedido; preceder, anteceder

cold snap - Golpe de frío, oleada de frío

"I'll go on to the first bend, and see if it's all right before we begin to race," Amy heard him say, as he shot away, looking like a young Russian in his fur-trimmed coat and cap.

Russian - ruso, ruso, rusa

trimmed - recortado; recortar, orlar, ribetear

Jo heard Amy panting after her run, stamping her feet and blowing on her fingers as she tried to put her skates on, but Jo never turned and went slowly zigzagging down the river, taking a bitter, unhappy sort of satisfaction in her sister's troubles. She had cherished her anger till it grew strong and took possession of her, as evil thoughts and feelings always do unless cast out at once. As Laurie turned the bend, he shouted back...

panting - Jadeando; (pant) Jadeando

zigzagging - zigzagueando; zigzag, en zigzag, zigzaguear

evil - malo, malvado

cast - moldear, elenco, castear, sondar, sondear, lanzar, lanzamiento

"Keep near the shore. It isn't safe in the middle." Jo heard, but Amy was struggling to her feet and did not catch a word. Jo glanced over her shoulder, and the little demon she was harboring said in her ear...

struggling - con dificultades; (struggle); lucha, forcejeo, brega, luchar

glanced - mirada; ojear, echar un vistazo, mirar, pispear, vistazo

demon - demonio

harboring - aguantando; puerto

"No matter whether she heard or not, let her take care of herself."

Laurie had vanished round the bend, Jo was just at the turn, and Amy, far behind, striking out toward the smoother ice in the middle of the river. For a minute Jo stood still with a strange feeling in her heart, then she resolved to go on, but something held and turned her round, just in time to see Amy throw up her hands and go down, with a sudden crash of rotten ice, the splash of water, and a cry that made Jo's heart stand still with fear.

striking - sorprendente; llamativo, imponente

rotten - podrido, estropeado, malo, putrefacto

splash - salpicaduras; salpicadura, chapotear, salpicar

She tried to call Laurie, but her voice was gone. She tried to rush forward, but her feet seemed to have no strength in them, and for a second, she could only stand motionless, staring with a terror-stricken face at the little blue hood above the black water. Something rushed swiftly by her, and Laurie's voice cried out...

rush forward - precipitarse, avanzar rápidamente

terror - terror

Swiftly - rápido; rápidamente

"Bring a rail. Quick, quick!"

rail - ferrocarril; barra

How she did it, she never knew, but for the next few minutes she worked as if possessed, blindly obeying Laurie, who was quite self-possessed, and lying flat, held Amy up by his arm and hockey stick till Jo dragged a rail from the fence, and together they got the child out, more frightened than hurt.

blindly - ciegamente, a ciegas, a tientas, a tiento

obeying - obedecer

more frightened - Más asustado

"Now then, we must walk her home as fast as we can. Pile our things on her, while I get off these confounded skates," cried Laurie, wrapping his coat round Amy, and tugging away at the straps which never seemed so intricate before.

pile - montón, pila

confounded - confundido; confundir, empeorar

wrapping - Envolver; (wrap) Envolver

tugging - Tirones; (tug); tirar, halar

straps - correas; correa, cincha, tirante

intricate - intrincado, complejo

Shivering, dripping, and crying, they got Amy home, and after an exciting time of it, she fell asleep, rolled in blankets before a hot fire. During the bustle Jo had scarcely spoken but flown about, looking pale and wild, with her things half off, her dress torn, and her hands cut and bruised by ice and rails and refractory buckles.

shivering - Tiritando; (shiver) Tiritando

dripping - goteo; chorreo; (drip) goteo; chorreo

blankets - mantas; manta, capa, general

bustle - tiempo; polisón, abundar

scarcely - apenas, difícilmente

bruised - herido; magullar, contusionar, mazar, machacar, macarse

rails - rieles; barra

refractory - refractario

buckles - hebillas; hebilla

When Amy was comfortably asleep, the house quiet, and Mrs. March sitting by the bed, she called Jo to her and began to bind up the hurt hands.

comfortably - cómodamente

bind - bindar; atar, atar (tie), empastar (books), liar, acoplar

"Are you sure she is safe?" whispered Jo, looking remorsefully at the golden head, which might have been swept away from her sight forever under the treacherous ice.

remorsefully - Con remordimientos

treacherous - traicionero

"Quite safe, dear. She is not hurt, and won't even take cold, I think, you were so sensible in covering and getting her home quickly," replied her mother cheerfully.

"Laurie did it all. I only let her go. Mother, if she should die, it would be my fault." And Jo dropped down beside the bed in a passion of penitent tears, telling all that had happened, bitterly condemning her hardness of heart, and sobbing out her gratitude for being spared the heavy punishment which might have come upon her.

penitent - arrepentido; penitente

bitterly - con amargura; amargamente

condemning - condenando; condenar, clausurar

hardness - dureza

sobbing - sollozando; sollozo, sollozante; (sob); hdp

spared - se salvó; palo, verga

"It's my dreadful temper! I try to cure it, I think I have, and then it breaks out worse than ever. Oh, Mother, what shall I do? What shall I do?" cried poor Jo, in despair.

cure - curar, remediar

breaks out - estallar; escapar; librar(se)

"Watch and pray, dear, never get tired of trying, and never think it is impossible to conquer your fault," said Mrs. March, drawing the blowzy head to her shoulder and kissing the wet cheek so tenderly that Jo cried even harder.

blowzy - Soplón

"You don't know, you can't guess how bad it is! It seems as if I could do anything when I'm in a passion. I get so savage, I could hurt anyone and enjoy it. I'm afraid I shall do something dreadful some day, and spoil my life, and make everybody hate me. Oh, Mother, help me, do help me!"

savage - salvaje

"I will, my child, I will. don't cry so bitterly, but remember this day, and resolve with all your soul that you will never know another like it. Jo, dear, we all have our temptations, some far greater than yours, and it often takes us all our lives to conquer them. You think your temper is the worst in the world, but mine used to be just like it."

don't cry - No llores

resolve - tomar la decisión de, resolver

temptations - entaciones; tentación

"Yours, Mother? Why, you are never angry!" And for the moment Jo forgot remorse in surprise.

"I've been trying to cure it for forty years, and have only succeeded in controlling it. I am angry nearly every day of my life, Jo, but I have learned not to show it, and I still hope to learn not to feel it, though it may take me another forty years to do so."

The patience and the humility of the face she loved so well was a better lesson to Jo than the wisest lecture, the sharpest reproof. She felt comforted at once by the sympathy and confidence given her. The knowledge that her mother had a fault like hers, and tried to mend it, made her own easier to bear and strengthened her resolution to cure it, though forty years seemed rather a long time to watch and pray to a girl of fifteen.

humility - humildad

reproof - reprobación, reprensión

confidence - confianza; certeza, certeza propia, certidumbre, confidencia

mend - remiendo, remendar, reparar

strengthened - fortalecido; fortalecer, animar

"Mother, are you angry when you fold your lips tight together and go out of the room sometimes, when Aunt March scolds or people worry you?" asked Jo, feeling nearer and dearer to her mother than ever before.

scolds - regana; reganar, retar, renir

"Yes, I've learned to check the hasty words that rise to my lips, and when I feel that they mean to break out against my will, I just go away for a minute, and give myself a little shake for being so weak and wicked," answered Mrs. March with a sigh and a smile, as she smoothed and fastened up Jo's disheveled hair.

disheveled - despeinado; desordenar

"How did you learn to keep still? That is what troubles me, for the sharp words fly out before I know what I'm about, and the more I say the worse I get, till it's a pleasure to hurt people's feelings and say dreadful things. Tell me how you do it, Marmee dear."

"My good mother used to help me..."

"As you do us..." interrupted Jo, with a grateful kiss.

interrupted - interrumpido; interrumpir, interrupción

"But I lost her when I was a little older than you are, and for years had to struggle on alone, for I was too proud to confess my weakness to anyone else. I had a hard time, Jo, and shed a good many bitter tears over my failures, for in spite of my efforts I never seemed to get on.

Struggle - lucha, forcejeo, brega, luchar, esforzarse con denuedo

confess - confesar, panish: t-needed

shed - cobertizo, nave

failures - fracasos; fallo, fracaso, fiasco, fracasado, avería

Then your father came, and I was so happy that I found it easy to be good. But by-and-by, when I had four little daughters round me and we were poor, then the old trouble began again, for I am not patient by nature, and it tried me very much to see my children wanting anything."

"Poor Mother! What helped you then?"

"Your father, Jo. He never loses patience, never doubts or complains, but always hopes, and works and waits so cheerfully that one is ashamed to do otherwise before him. He helped and comforted me, and showed me that I must try to practice all the virtues I would have my little girls possess, for I was their example.

possess - poseer

It was easier to try for your sakes than for my own. A startled or surprised look from one of you when I spoke sharply rebuked me more than any words could have done, and the love, respect, and confidence of my children was the sweetest reward I could receive for my efforts to be the woman I would have them copy."

sakes - para qué; por, por motivo de; por el bien de

rebuked - reprendido; reproche, reprensión, reprimenda, reprobación

"Oh, Mother, if I'm ever half as good as you, I shall be satisfied," cried Jo, much touched.

"I hope you will be a great deal better, dear, but you must keep watch over your ˜bosom enemy', as father calls it, or it may sadden, if not spoil your life. You have had a warning. Remember it, and try with heart and soul to master this quick temper, before it brings you greater sorrow and regret than you have known today."

sadden - apenar, entristecer, contristar

Master - maestro; senor, dueno; senora, duena

"I will try, Mother, I truly will. But you must help me, remind me, and keep me from flying out. I used to see Father sometimes put his finger on his lips, and look at you with a very kind but sober face, and you always folded your lips tight and went away. Was he reminding you then?" asked Jo softly.

flying out - salir; despegar; alejarse volando

"Yes. I asked him to help me so, and he never forgot it, but saved me from many a sharp word by that little gesture and kind look."

gesture - gesto, ademán, detalle, atención

Jo saw that her mother's eyes filled and her lips trembled as she spoke, and fearing that she had said too much, she whispered anxiously, "Was it wrong to watch you and to speak of it? I didn't mean to be rude, but it's so comfortable to say all I think to you, and feel so safe and happy here."

anxiously - ansioso; con inquietud, con ansiedad, ansiosamente

"My Jo, you may say anything to your mother, for it is my greatest happiness and pride to feel that my girls confide in me and know how much I love them."

confide - confiar

"I thought I'd grieved you."

"No, dear, but speaking of Father reminded me how much I miss him, how much I owe him, and how faithfully I should watch and work to keep his little daughters safe and good for him."

"Yet you told him to go, Mother, and didn't cry when he went, and never complain now, or seem as if you needed any help," said Jo, wondering.

"I gave my best to the country I love, and kept my tears till he was gone. Why should I complain, when we both have merely done our duty and will surely be the happier for it in the end? If I don't seem to need help, it is because I have a better friend, even than Father, to comfort and sustain me. My child, the troubles and temptations of your life are beginning and may be many, but you can overcome and outlive them all if you learn to feel the strength and tenderness of your Heavenly Father as you do that of your earthly one.

merely - simplemente; meramente, puramente, solamente, sólo

sustain - sostener, sustentar

outlive - sobrevivir (a)

tenderness - ternura

heavenly - celestial, celeste

earthly - terrenal

The more you love and trust Him, the nearer you will feel to Him, and the less you will depend on human power and wisdom. His love and care never tire or change, can never be taken from you, but may become the source of lifelong peace, happiness, and strength. Believe this heartily, and go to God with all your little cares, and hopes, and sins, and sorrows, as freely and confidingly as you come to your mother."

trust - confiar; confianza, crédito, fiar, consorcio, trust

wisdom - sabiduría

tire - neumático

lifelong - de toda la vida; vitalicio

freely - libremente

confidingly - Confidencialmente

Amy stirred and sighed in her sleep, and as if eager to begin at once to mend her fault, Jo looked up with an expression on her face which it had never worn before.

stirred - agitado; remover, revolver

"I let the sun go down on my anger. I wouldn't forgive her, and today, if it hadn't been for Laurie, it might have been too late! How could I be so wicked?" said Jo, half aloud, as she leaned over her sister softly stroking the wet hair scattered on the pillow.

scattered - dispersión; dispersar, esparcir, desviar

As if she heard, Amy opened her eyes, and held out her arms, with a smile that went straight to Jo's heart. Neither said a word, but they hugged one another close, in spite of the blankets, and everything was forgiven and forgotten in one hearty kiss.

hearty kiss - beso cordial

CHAPTER NINE. MEG GOES TO VANITY FAIR

vanity - vanidad

"I do think it was the most fortunate thing in the world that those children should have the measles just now," said Meg, one April day, as she stood packing the ˜go abroady'trunk in her room, surrounded by her sisters.

fortunate - afortunado, propicio, favorable, afortunada

measles - Sarampión

trunk - tronco, baúl, trompa

"And so nice of Annie Moffat not to forget her promise. A whole fortnight of fun will be regularly splendid," replied Jo, looking like a windmill as she folded skirts with her long arms.

fortnight - quince días; quincena

windmill - molino de viento, molinillo de viento

"And such lovely weather, I'm so glad of that," added Beth, tidily sorting neck and hair ribbons in her best box, lent for the great occasion.

tidily - Ordenadamente

"I wish I was going to have a fine time and wear all these nice things," said Amy with her mouth full of pins, as she artistically replenished her sister's cushion.

artistically - artísticamente

replenished - reabastecido; rellenar, reponer

"I wish you were all going, but as you can't, I shall keep my adventures to tell you when I come back. I'm sure it's the least I can do when you have been so kind, lending me things and helping me get ready," said Meg, glancing round the room at the very simple outfit, which seemed nearly perfect in their eyes.

outfit - conjunto, atuendo, tenida

"What did Mother give you out of the treasure box?" asked Amy, who had not been present at the opening of a certain cedar chest in which Mrs. March kept a few relics of past splendor, as gifts for her girls when the proper time came.

been present - Estar presente

cedar - cedro

relics - reliquias; reliquia, vestigio

splendor - esplendor

"A pair of silk stockings, that pretty carved fan, and a lovely blue sash. I wanted the violet silk, but there isn't time to make it over, so I must be contented with my old tarlaton."

silk stockings - medias de seda

carved - tallado; cortar, trinchar, tallar, esculpir

Violet - violeta

tarlaton - Tarlatón

"It will look nice over my new muslin skirt, and the sash will set it off beautifully. I wish I hadn't smashed my coral bracelet, for you might have had it," said Jo, who loved to give and lend, but whose possessions were usually too dilapidated to be of much use.

muslin - muselina

smashed - aplastado; estrellar, destrozar, golpear, machucar

coral - coral

bracelet - brazalete, pulsera

dilapidated - deteriorado; deteriorar, derrochar, deteriorarse

"There is a lovely old-fashioned pearl set in the treasure chest, but Mother said real flowers were the prettiest ornament for a young girl, and Laurie promised to send me all I want," replied Meg. "Now, let me see, there's my new gray walking suit, just curl up the feather in my hat, Beth, then my poplin for Sunday and the small party, it looks heavy for spring, doesn't it? The violet silk would be so nice. Oh, dear!"

curl up - acurrucarse

feather - pluma

poplin - Popplin

"Never mind, you've got the tarlaton for the big party, and you always look like an angel in white," said Amy, brooding over the little store of finery in which her soul delighted.

brooding - inquietante; meditativo; (brood); cría, polluelo, prole

finery - las galas

"It isn't low-necked, and it doesn't sweep enough, but it will have to do. My blue housedress looks so well, turned and freshly trimmed, that I feel as if I'd got a new one. My silk sacque isn't a bit the fashion, and my bonnet doesn't look like Sallie's. I didn't like to say anything, but I was sadly disappointed in my umbrella.

sweep - barrer, peinar

housedress - Vestido

I told Mother black with a white handle, but she forgot and bought a green one with a yellowish handle. It's strong and neat, so I ought not to complain, but I know I shall feel ashamed of it beside Annie's silk one with a gold top," sighed Meg, surveying the little umbrella with great disfavor.

handle - manejar; mango; asa; manilla, pomo(puerta)

yellowish - amarillento

feel ashamed - sentirse avergonzado

"Change it," advised Jo.

"I won't be so silly, or hurt Marmee's feelings, when she took so much pains to get my things. It's a nonsensical notion of mine, and I'm not going to give up to it. My silk stockings and two pairs of new gloves are my comfort. You are a dear to lend me yours, Jo. I feel so rich and sort of elegant, with two new pairs, and the old ones cleaned up for common." And Meg took a refreshing peep at her glove box.

refreshing - refrescante; refrescar

"Annie Moffat has blue and pink bows on her nightcaps. Would you put some on mine?" she asked, as Beth brought up a pile of snowy muslins, fresh from Hannah's hands.

bows - arcos; (bow) arcos

muslins - muselinas; muselina

"No, I wouldn't, for the smart caps won't match the plain gowns without any trimming on them. Poor folks shouldn't rig," said Jo decidedly.

Rig - arreglar; aparejar

"I wonder if I shall ever be happy enough to have real lace on my clothes and bows on my caps?" said Meg impatiently.

"You said the other day that you'd be perfectly happy if you could only go to Annie Moffat's," observed Beth in her quiet way.

perfectly happy - perfectamente feliz

"So I did! Well, I am happy, and I won't fret, but it does seem as if the more one gets the more one wants, doesn't it? There now, the trays are ready, and everything in but my ball dress, which I shall leave for Mother to pack," said Meg, cheering up, as she glanced from the half-filled trunk to the many times pressed and mended white tarlaton, which she called her ˜ball dress'with an important air.

trays - andejas; bandeja

ball dress - vestido de baile

The next day was fine, and Meg departed in style for a fortnight of novelty and pleasure. Mrs. March had consented to the visit rather reluctantly, fearing that Margaret would come back more discontented than she went.

novelty - novedad

more discontented - más descontento

But she begged so hard, and Sallie had promised to take good care of her, and a little pleasure seemed so delightful after a winter of irksome work that the mother yielded, and the daughter went to take her first taste of fashionable life.

irksome - molesto; fastidioso, enfadoso

yielded - cedido; ceder

The Moffats were very fashionable, and simple Meg was rather daunted, at first, by the splendor of the house and the elegance of its occupants. But they were kindly people, in spite of the frivolous life they led, and soon put their guest at her ease. Perhaps Meg felt, without understanding why, that they were not particularly cultivated or intelligent people, and that all their gilding could not quite conceal the ordinary material of which they were made. It certainly was agreeable to fare sumptuously, drive in a fine carriage, wear her best frock every day, and do nothing but enjoy herself.

daunted - asustado; descorazonar, intimidar, amedrentar, amilanar, agobiar

elegance - elegancia, checkchic

occupants - ocupantes; ocupante

cultivated - ultivado; cultivar

conceal - esconder, ocultar

fare - tarifa, precio del billete

sumptuously - untuosamente

It suited her exactly, and soon she began to imitate the manners and conversation of those about her, to put on little airs and graces, use French phrases, crimp her hair, take in her dresses, and talk about the fashions as well as she could. The more she saw of Annie Moffat's pretty things, the more she envied her and sighed to be rich. Home now looked bare and dismal as she thought of it, work grew harder than ever, and she felt that she was a very destitute and much-injured girl, in spite of the new gloves and silk stockings.

imitate - imitar

graces - gracias; (grace); gracias, benedícite, gracia, donaire, merced

crimp - Engarzar

envied - envidiado; envidia, pelusa, envidiar

destitute - indigente

She had not much time for repining, however, for the three young girls were busily employed in ˜having a good time'. They shopped, walked, rode, and called all day, went to theaters and operas or frolicked at home in the evening, for Annie had many friends and knew how to entertain them. Her older sisters were very fine young ladies, and one was engaged, which was extremely interesting and romantic, Meg thought.

busily - Ocupado

Operas - operas; ópera

Mr. Moffat was a fat, jolly old gentleman, who knew her father, and Mrs. Moffat, a fat, jolly old lady, who took as great a fancy to Meg as her daughter had done. Everyone petted her, and ˜Daisey', as they called her, was in a fair way to have her head turned.

When the evening for the small party came, she found that the poplin wouldn't do at all, for the other girls were putting on thin dresses and making themselves very fine indeed. So out came the tarlatan, looking older, limper, and shabbier than ever beside Sallie's crisp new one. Meg saw the girls glance at it and then at one another, and her cheeks began to burn, for with all her gentleness she was very proud.

shabbier - shabbier; raído, astroso, zarrapastroso, cutre, harapiento

crisp - crujiente, preciso, burbujeante, efervescente

gentleness - gentileza; suavidad, dulzura

No one said a word about it, but Sallie offered to dress her hair, and Annie to tie her sash, and Belle, the engaged sister, praised her white arms. But in their kindness Meg saw only pity for her poverty, and her heart felt very heavy as she stood by herself, while the others laughed, chattered, and flew about like gauzy butterflies. The hard, bitter feeling was getting pretty bad, when the maid brought in a box of flowers. Before she could speak, Annie had the cover off, and all were exclaiming at the lovely roses, heath, and fern within.

kindness - amabilidad, bondad

butterflies - mariposas; mariposa

Heath - páramo, brezal, brezo

fern - helecho, helez

"It's for Belle, of course, George always sends her some, but these are altogether ravishing," cried Annie, with a great sniff.

George - Jorge

"They are for Miss March, the man said. And here's a note," put in the maid, holding it to Meg.

"What fun! Who are they from? Didn't know you had a lover," cried the girls, fluttering about Meg in a high state of curiosity and surprise.

"The note is from Mother, and the flowers from Laurie," said Meg simply, yet much gratified that he had not forgotten her.

"Oh, indeed!" said Annie with a funny look, as Meg slipped the note into her pocket as a sort of talisman against envy, vanity, and false pride, for the few loving words had done her good, and the flowers cheered her up by their beauty.

talisman - talismán

cheered - aclamado; viva, hurra

Feeling almost happy again, she laid by a few ferns and roses for herself, and quickly made up the rest in dainty bouquets for the breasts, hair, or skirts of her friends, offering them so prettily that Clara, the elder sister, told her she was ˜the sweetest little thing she ever saw', and they looked quite charmed with her small attention.

ferns - helechos; helecho, helez

breasts - senos; pecho, seno, teta, corazón, pechuga

prettily - bonito; bellamente, hermosamente, lindamente

charmed - encantado; encanto

Somehow the kind act finished her despondency, and when all the rest went to show themselves to Mrs. Moffat, she saw a happy, bright-eyed face in the mirror, as she laid her ferns against her rippling hair and fastened the roses in the dress that didn't strike her as so very shabby now.

despondency - desánimo; desesperanza, desesperación, descorazonamiento

rippling - ndulación; (ripple) ndulación

She enjoyed herself very much that evening, for she danced to her heart's content. Everyone was very kind, and she had three compliments. Annie made her sing, and some one said she had a remarkably fine voice. Major Lincoln asked who ˜the fresh little girl with the beautiful eyes'was, and Mr. Moffat insisted on dancing with her because she ˜didn't dawdle, but had some spring in her', as he gracefully expressed it. So altogether she had a very nice time, till she overheard a bit of conversation, which disturbed her extremely.

overheard - oído por casualidad; oír por casualidad, oír sin querer

She was sitting just inside the conservatory, waiting for her partner to bring her an ice, when she heard a voice ask on the other side of the flowery wall...

flowery - floral, florido, bombástico

"How old is he?"

"Sixteen or seventeen, I should say," replied another voice.

"It would be a grand thing for one of those girls, wouldn't it? Sallie says they are very intimate now, and the old man quite dotes on them."

intimate - intimo; íntimo

dotes - dotes; amoroso

"Mrs. M. has made her plans, I dare say, and will play her cards well, early as it is. The girl evidently doesn't think of it yet," said Mrs. Moffat.

"She told that fib about her momma, as if she did know, and colored up when the flowers came quite prettily. Poor thing! She'd be so nice if she was only got up in style. Do you think she'd be offended if we offered to lend her a dress for Thursday?" asked another voice.

Momma - mamá

"She's proud, but I don't believe she'd mind, for that dowdy tarlaton is all she has got. She may tear it tonight, and that will be a good excuse for offering a decent one."

dowdy - desalinada; desalinado

Excuse - disculpe; excusar, perdonar, panish: t-needed

decent - decente

Here Meg's partner appeared, to find her looking much flushed and rather agitated. She was proud, and her pride was useful just then, for it helped her hide her mortification, anger, and disgust at what she had just heard. For, innocent and unsuspicious as she was, she could not help understanding the gossip of her friends. She tried to forget it, but could not, and kept repeating to herself, "Mrs. M. has made her plans," "that fib about her mamma," and "dowdy tarlaton," till she was ready to cry and rush home to tell her troubles and ask for advice. As that was impossible, she did her best to seem gay, and being rather excited, she succeeded so well that no one dreamed what an effort she was making. She was very glad when it was all over and she was quiet in her bed, where she could think and wonder and fume till her head ached and her hot cheeks were cooled by a few natural tears.

agitated - agitado; agitar, perturbar

unsuspicious - insospechable

mamma - mama, mamá

rush - prisa; precipitarse, lanzarse, correr, ir rápidamente

fume - humo, humear, echar humo

ached - te dolía; dolor

Those foolish, yet well meant words, had opened a new world to Meg, and much disturbed the peace of the old one in which till now she had lived as happily as a child. Her innocent friendship with Laurie was spoiled by the silly speeches she had overheard. Her faith in her mother was a little shaken by the worldly plans attributed to her by Mrs. Moffat, who judged others by herself, and the sensible resolution to be contented with the simple wardrobe which suited a poor man's daughter was weakened by the unnecessary pity of girls who thought a shabby dress one of the greatest calamities under heaven.

foolish - tonto, necio, imprudente

till now - hasta ahora

Faith - fe, confianza

worldly - undano

attributed - atribuido; atributo, atribuir

wardrobe - ropa; armario, ropero, clóset, escaparate

weakened - ebilitado; debilitar, languir, debilitarse, languecer

calamities - alamidades; calamidad, panish: t-needed

Poor Meg had a restless night, and got up heavy-eyed, unhappy, half resentful toward her friends, and half ashamed of herself for not speaking out frankly and setting everything right. Everybody dawdled that morning, and it was noon before the girls found energy enough even to take up their worsted work. Something in the manner of her friends struck Meg at once.

resentful - resentido

noon - mediodía

worsted - Estambre; (worst); lo peor, la peor

They treated her with more respect, she thought, took quite a tender interest in what she said, and looked at her with eyes that plainly betrayed curiosity. All this surprised and flattered her, though she did not understand it till Miss Belle looked up from her writing, and said, with a sentimental air...

betrayed - traicionado; traicionar, entregar, vender, delatar, demostrar

flattered - te sientes halagado; halagar, adular

"Daisy, dear, I've sent an invitation to your friend, Mr. Laurence, for Thursday. We should like to know him, and it's only a proper compliment to you."

daisy - margarita común, chiribita, margarita

Meg colored, but a mischievous fancy to tease the girls made her reply demurely, "You are very kind, but I'm afraid he won't come."

tease - bromear; cardar, peinar, burlarse de, molestar, tomar el pelo

demurely - con recato

"Why not, Cherie?" asked Miss Belle.

"He's too old."

"My child, what do you mean? What is his age, I beg to know!" cried Miss Clara.

"Nearly seventy, I believe," answered Meg, counting stitches to hide the merriment in her eyes.

stitches - puntos; puntada

"You sly creature! Of course we meant the young man," exclaimed Miss Belle, laughing.

"There isn't any, Laurie is only a little boy." And Meg laughed also at the queer look which the sisters exchanged as she thus described her supposed lover.

thus - así

"About your age," Nan said.

nan - abu, abuelita

"Nearer my sister Jo's; I am seventeen in August," returned Meg, tossing her head.

tossing - Tirar; (toss); tiro, lanzamiento, lanzar una moneda al aire

"It's very nice of him to send you flowers, isn't it?" said Annie, looking wise about nothing.

isn't it? - ?No es así?

"Yes, he often does, to all of us, for their house is full, and we are so fond of them. My mother and old Mr. Laurence are friends, you know, so it is quite natural that we children should play together," and Meg hoped they would say no more.

"It's evident Daisy isn't out yet," said Miss Clara to Belle with a nod.

"Quite a pastoral state of innocence all round," returned Miss Belle with a shrug.

pastoral - pastoral

innocence - inocencia

"I'm going out to get some little matters for my girls. Can I do anything for you, young ladies?" asked Mrs. Moffat, lumbering in like an elephant in silk and lace.

lumbering - Torpe; (lumber); madera aserrada

"No, thank you, ma'am," replied Sallie. "I've got my new pink silk for Thursday and don't want a thing."

"Nor I..." began Meg, but stopped because it occurred to her that she did want several things and could not have them.

"What shall you wear?" asked Sallie.

"My old white one again, if I can mend it fit to be seen, it got sadly torn last night," said Meg, trying to speak quite easily, but feeling very uncomfortable.

"Why don't you send home for another?" said Sallie, who was not an observing young lady.

observing - observando; observar, seguir, tomar en cuenta

"I haven't got any other." It cost Meg an effort to say that, but Sallie did not see it and exclaimed in amiable surprise, "Only that? How funny..." She did not finish her speech, for Belle shook her head at her and broke in, saying kindly...

amiable - amable, afable

"Not at all. Where is the use of having a lot of dresses when she isn't out yet? There's no need of sending home, Daisy, even if you had a dozen, for I've got a sweet blue silk laid away, which I've outgrown, and you shall wear it to please me, won't you, dear?"

outgrown - uperado; crecer más que

"You are very kind, but I don't mind my old dress if you don't, it does well enough for a little girl like me," said Meg.

I don't mind - No me importa.

"Now do let me please myself by dressing you up in style. I admire to do it, and you'd be a regular little beauty with a touch here and there. I shan't let anyone see you till you are done, and then we'll burst upon them like Cinderella and her godmother going to the ball," said Belle in her persuasive tone.

Cinderella - Cenicienta

Godmother - madrina, comadre

persuasive - persuasivo, convincente, persuasor, persuasorio

Meg couldn't refuse the offer so kindly made, for a desire to see if she would be ˜a little beauty'after touching up caused her to accept and forget all her former uncomfortable feelings toward the Moffats.

former - antiguo, anterior

On the Thursday evening, Belle shut herself up with her maid, and between them they turned Meg into a fine lady. They crimped and curled her hair, they polished her neck and arms with some fragrant powder, touched her lips with coralline salve to make them redder, and Hortense would have added ˜a soupcon of rouge', if Meg had not rebelled. They laced her into a sky-blue dress, which was so tight she could hardly breathe and so low in the neck that modest Meg blushed at herself in the mirror. A set of silver filagree was added, bracelets, necklace, brooch, and even earrings, for Hortense tied them on with a bit of pink silk which did not show.

crimped - Engarzar

curled - rizado; rizo, bucle, flexión

polished - pulido; polaco, polonés, polaco

coralline - coralina; coralino

salve - ungüento, bálsamo

soupcon - Soppcon

rebelled - se rebeló; rebelde

laced - con cordones; cordón

sky-blue - (sky-blue) azul celeste

modest - modesto, humilde, pequeno, moderado; (mod); modesto, humilde

filagree - Filigrana

bracelets - pulseras; brazalete, pulsera

necklace - collar

brooch - un broche; broche

earrings - pendientes; arete

A cluster of tea-rose buds at the bosom, and a ruche, reconciled Meg to the display of her pretty, white shoulders, and a pair of high-heeled silk boots satisfied the last wish of her heart. A lace handkerchief, a plumy fan, and a bouquet in a shoulder holder finished her off, and Miss Belle surveyed her with the satisfaction of a little girl with a newly dressed doll.

tea-rose - (tea-rose) Rosa de té

buds - brotes; brote

reconciled - reconciliado; reconciliar, avenir

"Mademoiselle is charmante, tres jolie, is she not?" cried Hortense, clasping her hands in an affected rapture.

charmante - Encantador

tres - tres cubano, tres

clasping - Chocando; (clasp); broche, manija, corchete, hebilla, agarrar

"Come and show yourself," said Miss Belle, leading the way to the room where the others were waiting.

As Meg went rustling after, with her long skirts trailing, her earrings tinkling, her curls waving, and her heart beating, she felt as if her fun had really begun at last, for the mirror had plainly told her that she was ˜a little beauty'.

tinkling - Tintineo; (tinkle) Tintineo

Her friends repeated the pleasing phrase enthusiastically, and for several minutes she stood, like a jackdaw in the fable, enjoying her borrowed plumes, while the rest chattered like a party of magpies.

enthusiastically - con entusiasmo

jackdaw - gavilán; grajilla

fable - fábula

plumes - plumas; pluma

magpies - urracas; urraca, picaza, marica, pega

"While I dress, do you drill her, Nan, in the management of her skirt and those French heels, or she will trip herself up. Take your silver butterfly, and catch up that long curl on the left side of her head, Clara, and don't any of you disturb the charming work of my hands," said Belle, as she hurried away, looking well pleased with her success.

butterfly - mariposa

curl - rulo; rizo, bucle, flexión

"You don't look a bit like yourself, but you are very nice. I'm nowhere beside you, for Belle has heaps of taste, and you're quite French, I assure you. Let your flowers hang, don't be so careful of them, and be sure you don't trip," returned Sallie, trying not to care that Meg was prettier than herself.

assure - asegurar

Keeping that warning carefully in mind, Margaret got safely down stairs and sailed into the drawing rooms where the Moffats and a few early guests were assembled. She very soon discovered that there is a charm about fine clothes which attracts a certain class of people and secures their respect. Several young ladies, who had taken no notice of her before, were very affectionate all of a sudden.

safely - seguro; seguramente

secures - asegura; seguro, resguardado, confiable, aplomado

affectionate - Carinoso

Several young gentlemen, who had only stared at her at the other party, now not only stared, but asked to be introduced, and said all manner of foolish but agreeable things to her, and several old ladies, who sat on the sofas, and criticized the rest of the party, inquired who she was with an air of interest. She heard Mrs. Moffat reply to one of them...

sofas - sofás; sofá, sillón

inquired - preguntó; investigar, informarse

"Daisy March"father a colonel in the army"one of our first families, but reverses of fortune, you know; intimate friends of the Laurences; sweet creature, I assure you; my Ned is quite wild about her."

Colonel - coronel

reverses - inversiones; dar marcha atrás

"Dear me!" said the old lady, putting up her glass for another observation of Meg, who tried to look as if she had not heard and been rather shocked at Mrs. Moffat's fibs. The ˜queer feeling'did not pass away, but she imagined herself acting the new part of fine lady and so got on pretty well, though the tight dress gave her a side-ache, the train kept getting under her feet, and she was in constant fear lest her earrings should fly off and get lost or broken. She was flirting her fan and laughing at the feeble jokes of a young gentleman who tried to be witty, when she suddenly stopped laughing and looked confused, for just opposite, she saw Laurie.

observation - observación, vigilancia; observancia, anotación, registro

fibs - fibs; bola, trola, mentirijilla

pass away - fallecer

constant - constante, perseverante, firme, constante

flirting - Coqueteando; (flirt); coqueto, coqueta, flirteo, coqueteo

witty - panish: t-needed

He was staring at her with undisguised surprise, and disapproval also, she thought, for though he bowed and smiled, yet something in his honest eyes made her blush and wish she had her old dress on. To complete her confusion, she saw Belle nudge Annie, and both glance from her to Laurie, who, she was happy to see, looked unusually boyish and shy.

undisguised - sin disimular

disapproval - desaprobación

confusion - confusión

nudge - un codazo; pequeno empujón, empujoncito

"Silly creatures, to put such thoughts into my head. I won't care for it, or let it change me a bit," thought Meg, and rustled across the room to shake hands with her friend.

rustled - susurrado; crujido

"I'm glad you came, I was afraid you wouldn't." she said, with her most grown-up air.

"Jo wanted me to come, and tell her how you looked, so I did," answered Laurie, without turning his eyes upon her, though he half smiled at her maternal tone.

"What shall you tell her?" asked Meg, full of curiosity to know his opinion of her, yet feeling ill at ease with him for the first time.

"I shall say I didn't know you, for you look so grown-up and unlike yourself, I'm quite afraid of you," he said, fumbling at his glove button.

fumbling - buscar/revolver a tientas/torpemente, manejar torpemente

"How absurd of you! The girls dressed me up for fun, and I rather like it. Wouldn't Jo stare if she saw me?" said Meg, bent on making him say whether he thought her improved or not.

"Yes, I think she would," returned Laurie gravely.

"Don't you like me so?" asked Meg.

"No, I don't," was the blunt reply.

"Why not?" in an anxious tone.

He glanced at her frizzled head, bare shoulders, and fantastically trimmed dress with an expression that abashed her more than his answer, which had not a particle of his usual politeness in it.

fantastically - fantásticamente

politeness - educación, cortesía

"I don't like fuss and feathers."

fuss - alboroto; fandango, jaleo, escándalo

That was altogether too much from a lad younger than herself, and Meg walked away, saying petulantly, "You are the rudest boy I ever saw."

Feeling very much ruffled, she went and stood at a quiet window to cool her cheeks, for the tight dress gave her an uncomfortably brilliant color. As she stood there, Major Lincoln passed by, and a minute after she heard him saying to his mother...

ruffled - revuelto; volante, retorcer

"They are making a fool of that little girl. I wanted you to see her, but they have spoiled her entirely. She's nothing but a doll tonight."

fool - idiota; bobo, imbécil, necio, pendejo, bufón, loco

"Oh, dear!" sighed Meg. "I wish I'd been sensible and worn my own things, then I should not have disgusted other people, or felt so uncomfortable and ashamed of myself."

disgusted - asqueado; repugnar, dar asco, asquear, asco, repugnancia

She leaned her forehead on the cool pane, and stood half hidden by the curtains, never minding that her favorite waltz had begun, till some one touched her, and turning, she saw Laurie, looking penitent, as he said, with his very best bow and his hand out...

pane - panel; cristal, vidrio

waltz - vals, valsar, bailar vals

"Please forgive my rudeness, and come and dance with me."

rudeness - grosería, ordinariez

"I'm afraid it will be too disagreeable to you," said Meg, trying to look offended and failing entirely.

"Not a bit of it, I'm dying to do it. Come, I'll be good. I don't like your gown, but I do think you are just splendid." And he waved his hands, as if words failed to express his admiration.

Meg smiled and relented, and whispered as they stood waiting to catch the time, "Take care my skirt doesn't trip you up. It's the plague of my life and I was a goose to wear it."

relented - cedió; ceder

"Pin it round your neck, and then it will be useful," said Laurie, looking down at the little blue boots, which he evidently approved of.

approved - aprobado; aprobar; tener un buen concepto de

Away they went fleetly and gracefully, for having practiced at home, they were well matched, and the blithe young couple were a pleasant sight to see, as they twirled merrily round and round, feeling more friendly than ever after their small tiff.

fleetly - fácilmente

blithe - descuidado, indiferente, alegre, feliz

twirled - girado; pirueta, girar

tiff - rina, pelea sin trascendencia

"Laurie, I want you to do me a favor, will you?" said Meg, as he stood fanning her when her breath gave out, which it did very soon though she would not own why.

"Won't I!" said Laurie, with alacrity.

alacrity - esmero, alacridad, presteza, prontitud

"Please don't tell them at home about my dress tonight. They won't understand the joke, and it will worry Mother."

"Then why did you do it?" said Laurie's eyes, so plainly that Meg hastily added...

"I shall tell them myself all about it, and ˜fess'to Mother how silly I've been. But I'd rather do it myself. So you'll not tell, will you?"

"I give you my word I won't, only what shall I say when they ask me?"

"Just say I looked pretty well and was having a good time."

"I'll say the first with all my heart, but how about the other? You don't look as if you were having a good time. Are you?" And Laurie looked at her with an expression which made her answer in a whisper...

whisper - susurro, rumor, rastro, susurrar

"No, not just now. Don't think I'm horrid. I only wanted a little fun, but this sort doesn't pay, I find, and I'm getting tired of it."

"Here comes Ned Moffat. What does he want?" said Laurie, knitting his black brows as if he did not regard his young host in the light of a pleasant addition to the party.

"He put his name down for three dances, and I suppose he's coming for them. What a bore!" said Meg, assuming a languid air which amused Laurie immensely.

assuming - Suponiendo; (assume); suponer, dar por sentado, asumir

languid - lánguida; lánguido

He did not speak to her again till suppertime, when he saw her drinking champagne with Ned and his friend Fisher, who were behaving ˜like a pair of fools', as Laurie said to himself, for he felt a brotherly sort of right to watch over the Marches and fight their battles whenever a defender was needed.

suppertime - Hora de cenar

champagne - champán; Champana

fools - idiotas; bobo, imbécil, necio, pendejo, bufón, loco

brotherly - fraternal, fraterno

defender - defensor, defensora

"You'll have a splitting headache tomorrow, if you drink much of that. I wouldn't, Meg, your mother doesn't like it, you know," he whispered, leaning over her chair, as Ned turned to refill her glass and Fisher stooped to pick up her fan.

splitting headache - Dolor de cabeza agudo

refill - rellenar; recambio; carga

stooped - encorvado; inclinarse, agacharse

"I'm not Meg tonight, I'm ˜a doll'who does all sorts of crazy things. Tomorrow I shall put away my ˜fuss and feathers'and be desperately good again," she answered with an affected little laugh.

"Wish tomorrow was here, then," muttered Laurie, walking off, ill-pleased at the change he saw in her.

Meg danced and flirted, chattered and giggled, as the other girls did. After supper she undertook the German, and blundered through it, nearly upsetting her partner with her long skirt, and romping in a way that scandalized Laurie, who looked on and meditated a lecture. But he got no chance to deliver it, for Meg kept away from him till he came to say good night.

flirted - coqueteó; coqueto, coqueta, flirteo, coqueteo, flirtear

giggled - se rió; reír

blundered - se equivocó; error

romping - jugando; retozar, retozo, revolcón

scandalized - Escandalizar

meditated - meditado; meditar

kept away - mantenerse a distancia

"Remember!" she said, trying to smile, for the splitting headache had already begun.

splitting - División; (split); fisura, escisión, partir, dividir, escindir

"Silence a la mort," replied Laurie, with a melodramatic flourish, as he went away.

This little bit of byplay excited Annie's curiosity, but Meg was too tired for gossip and went to bed, feeling as if she had been to a masquerade and hadn't enjoyed herself as much as she expected. She was sick all the next day, and on Saturday went home, quite used up with her fortnight's fun and feeling that she had ˜sat in the lap of luxury'long enough.

byplay - Jugar

masquerade - mascarada

"It does seem pleasant to be quiet, and not have company manners on all the time. Home is a nice place, though it isn't splendid," said Meg, looking about her with a restful expression, as she sat with her mother and Jo on the Sunday evening.

restful - Descansar

"I'm glad to hear you say so, dear, for I was afraid home would seem dull and poor to you after your fine quarters," replied her mother, who had given her many anxious looks that day. For motherly eyes are quick to see any change in children's faces.

Meg had told her adventures gayly and said over and over what a charming time she had had, but something still seemed to weigh upon her spirits, and when the younger girls were gone to bed, she sat thoughtfully staring at the fire, saying little and looking worried. As the clock struck nine and Jo proposed bed, Meg suddenly left her chair and, taking Beth's stool, leaned her elbows on her mother's knee, saying bravely...

gayly - Gay

"Marmee, I want to ˜fess'."

"I thought so. What is it, dear?"

"Shall I go away?" asked Jo discreetly.

discreetly - discretamente; disimuladamente

"Of course not. Don't I always tell you everything? I was ashamed to speak of it before the younger children, but I want you to know all the dreadful things I did at the Moffats'."

"We are prepared," said Mrs. March, smiling but looking a little anxious.

"I told you they dressed me up, but I didn't tell you that they powdered and squeezed and frizzled, and made me look like a fashion-plate. Laurie thought I wasn't proper. I know he did, though he didn't say so, and one man called me ˜a doll'. I knew it was silly, but they flattered me and said I was a beauty, and quantities of nonsense, so I let them make a fool of me."

squeezed - exprimido; exprimir, apretar, apretujar, apuro, crisis, apretón

"Is that all?" asked Jo, as Mrs. March looked silently at the downcast face of her pretty daughter, and could not find it in her heart to blame her little follies.

downcast - alicaído, abatido

follies - locuras; capricho

"No, I drank champagne and romped and tried to flirt, and was altogether abominable," said Meg self-reproachfully.

romped - romped; retozar, retozo, revolcón

flirt - coquetear; coqueto, coqueta, flirteo, coqueteo, flirtear

reproachfully - con reproche

"There is something more, I think." And Mrs. March smoothed the soft cheek, which suddenly grew rosy as Meg answered slowly...

"Yes. It's very silly, but I want to tell it, because I hate to have people say and think such things about us and Laurie."

Then she told the various bits of gossip she had heard at the Moffats', and as she spoke, Jo saw her mother fold her lips tightly, as if ill pleased that such ideas should be put into Meg's innocent mind.

"Well, if that isn't the greatest rubbish I ever heard," cried Jo indignantly. "Why didn't you pop out and tell them so on the spot?"

indignantly - con indignación

"I couldn't, it was so embarrassing for me. I couldn't help hearing at first, and then I was so angry and ashamed, I didn't remember that I ought to go away."

"Just wait till I see Annie Moffat, and I'll show you how to settle such ridiculous stuff. The idea of having ˜plans'and being kind to Laurie because he's rich and may marry us by-and-by! Won't he shout when I tell him what those silly things say about us poor children?" And Jo laughed, as if on second thoughts the thing struck her as a good joke.

settle - nos conformamos; instalar, colocar

"If you tell Laurie, I'll never forgive you! She mustn't, must she, Mother?" said Meg, looking distressed.

distressed - angustiado; aflicción, angustia, desasosiego, ansiedad

"No, never repeat that foolish gossip, and forget it as soon as you can," said Mrs. March gravely. "I was very unwise to let you go among people of whom I know so little, kind, I dare say, but worldly, ill-bred, and full of these vulgar ideas about young people. I am more sorry than I can express for the mischief this visit may have done you, Meg."

bred - criado; (breed); criar, procrear, aparearse, cultivar

vulgar - vulgar, chabacano, ramplón

"Don't be sorry, I won't let it hurt me. I'll forget all the bad and remember only the good, for I did enjoy a great deal, and thank you very much for letting me go. I'll not be sentimental or dissatisfied, Mother. I know I'm a silly little girl, and I'll stay with you till I'm fit to take care of myself. But it is nice to be praised and admired, and I can't help saying I like it," said Meg, looking half ashamed of the confession.

dissatisfied - insatisfecho; descontentar

confession - confesión

"That is perfectly natural, and quite harmless, if the liking does not become a passion and lead one to do foolish or unmaidenly things. Learn to know and value the praise which is worth having, and to excite the admiration of excellent people by being modest as well as pretty, Meg."

unmaidenly - Sin doncella

Margaret sat thinking a moment, while Jo stood with her hands behind her, looking both interested and a little perplexed, for it was a new thing to see Meg blushing and talking about admiration, lovers, and things of that sort. And Jo felt as if during that fortnight her sister had grown up amazingly, and was drifting away from her into a world where she could not follow.

perplexed - perplejo; confundir, desconcertar

blushing - Te ruborizas; (blush) Te ruborizas

drifting - deriva, derrape, ir a la deriva, vagar, derivar, errar

"Mother, do you have ˜plans', as Mrs. Moffat said?" asked Meg bashfully.

bashfully - tímidamente

"Yes, my dear, I have a great many, all mothers do, but mine differ somewhat from Mrs. Moffat's, I suspect. I will tell you some of them, for the time has come when a word may set this romantic little head and heart of yours right, on a very serious subject.

differ - difieren; ser distinto

You are young, Meg, but not too young to understand me, and mothers'lips are the fittest to speak of such things to girls like you. Jo, your turn will come in time, perhaps, so listen to my ˜plans'and help me carry them out, if they are good."

Jo went and sat on one arm of the chair, looking as if she thought they were about to join in some very solemn affair. Holding a hand of each, and watching the two young faces wistfully, Mrs. March said, in her serious yet cheery way...

solemn - solemne

"I want my daughters to be beautiful, accomplished, and good. To be admired, loved, and respected. To have a happy youth, to be well and wisely married, and to lead useful, pleasant lives, with as little care and sorrow to try them as God sees fit to send. To be loved and chosen by a good man is the best and sweetest thing which can happen to a woman, and I sincerely hope my girls may know this beautiful experience. It is natural to think of it, Meg, right to hope and wait for it, and wise to prepare for it, so that when the happy time comes, you may feel ready for the duties and worthy of the joy. My dear girls, I am ambitious for you, but not to have you make a dash in the world, marry rich men merely because they are rich, or have splendid houses, which are not homes because love is wanting. Money is a needful and precious thing, and when well used, a noble thing, but I never want you to think it is the first or only prize to strive for.

wisely - sabiamente

Dash - raya, guion largo, carrerita, gota, pizca, lanzarse, romper

needful - Necesario

strive - esforzarse

I'd rather see you poor men's wives, if you were happy, beloved, contented, than queens on thrones, without self-respect and peace."

thrones - tronos; trono

"Poor girls don't stand any chance, Belle says, unless they put themselves forward," sighed Meg.

"Then we'll be old maids," said Jo stoutly.

stoutly - con fuerza

"Right, Jo. Better be happy old maids than unhappy wives, or unmaidenly girls, running about to find husbands," said Mrs. March decidedly. "Don't be troubled, Meg, poverty seldom daunts a sincere lover. Some of the best and most honored women I know were poor girls, but so love-worthy that they were not allowed to be old maids. Leave these things to time. Make this home happy, so that you may be fit for homes of your own, if they are offered you, and contented here if they are not.

daunts - esalienta; descorazonar, intimidar, amedrentar, amilanar

honored - honrado; honor, privilegio, honrar, ajustarse, acatar, respetar

be fit - Estar en forma

One thing remember, my girls. Mother is always ready to be your confidant, Father to be your friend, and both of us hope and trust that our daughters, whether married or single, will be the pride and comfort of our lives."

"We will, Marmee, we will!" cried both, with all their hearts, as she bade them good night.

CHAPTER TEN. THE P.C. AND P.O.

As spring came on, a new set of amusements became the fashion, and the lengthening days gave long afternoons for work and play of all sorts. The garden had to be put in order, and each sister had a quarter of the little plot to do what she liked with. Hannah used to say, "I'd know which each of them gardings belonged to, ef I see 'em in Chiny," and so she might, for the girls'tastes differed as much as their characters. Meg's had roses and heliotrope, myrtle, and a little orange tree in it. Jo's bed was never alike two seasons, for she was always trying experiments. This year it was to be a plantation of sun flowers, the seeds of which cheerful and aspiring plant were to feed Aunt Cockle-top and her family of chicks.

amusements - diversiones; divertimiento, esparcimiento, diversión

Lengthening - alargamiento; alargar

gardings - Jardines

ef - efe

differed - diferían; ser distinto

Myrtle - arrayán, murta, mirto

alike - igual, semejante, parecido, igualmente

plantation - plantación

aspiring - aspirando; aspirar, ambicionar

cockle - Berberecho

chicks - chicas; pollito

Beth had old-fashioned fragrant flowers in her garden, sweet peas and mignonette, larkspur, pinks, pansies, and southernwood, with chickweed for the birds and catnip for the pussies. Amy had a bower in hers, rather small and earwiggy, but very pretty to look at, with honeysuckle and morning-glories hanging their colored horns and bells in graceful wreaths all over it, tall white lilies, delicate ferns, and as many brilliant, picturesque plants as would consent to blossom there.

peas - Guisantes; (pea) Guisantes

Larkspur - espuela de caballero

southernwood - Southwood

chickweed - capiquí, pamplina, hierba gallinera

catnip - menta de gato, nébeda, hierba gatera, menta gatuna

pussies - conos; minino, gatito

earwiggy - Orejudo

honeysuckle - madreselva

horns - cuernos; cuerno

wreaths - coronas; guirnalda, corona, burelete, rodear

lilies - lirios; azucena, lirio

picturesque - pintoresco

consent - consentir, consentimiento, venia, anuencia

blossom - flor, floración, florecer

Gardening, walks, rows on the river, and flower hunts employed the fine days, and for rainy ones, they had house diversions, some old, some new, all more or less original. One of these was the ˜P.C.', for as secret societies were the fashion, it was thought proper to have one, and as all of the girls admired Dickens, they called themselves the Pickwick Club. With a few interruptions, they had kept this up for a year, and met every Saturday evening in the big garret, on which occasions the ceremonies were as follows: Three chairs were arranged in a row before a table on which was a lamp, also four white badges, with a big ˜P.C.'in different colors on each, and the weekly newspaper called, The Pickwick Portfolio, to which all contributed something, while Jo, who reveled in pens and ink, was the editor. At seven o'clock, the four members ascended to the clubroom, tied their badges round their heads, and took their seats with great solemnity.

rows - filas; hilera, fila

rainy - lloviendo; lluvioso, pluvioso

diversions - diversiones; distracción, diversión, desviación

secret societies - Sociedades secretas

interruptions - interrupciones; interrupción, paréntesis

badges - insignias; insignia, pin, medalla, piocha, identificación

weekly - semanalmente, cada semana, todas las semanas, semanario

portfolio - portafolio, portafolios, carpeta de trabajos, cartera

contributed - ontribuido; contribuir

ink - tinta, entintar, firmar, tatuar

ascended - ascendió; subir, ascender

clubroom - Club

solemnity - solemnidad

Meg, as the eldest, was Samuel Pickwick, Jo, being of a literary turn, Augustus Snodgrass, Beth, because she was round and rosy, Tracy Tupman, and Amy, who was always trying to do what she couldn't, was Nathaniel Winkle. Pickwick, the president, read the paper, which was filled with original tales, poetry, local news, funny advertisements, and hints, in which they good-naturedly reminded each other of their faults and short comings. On one occasion, Mr. Pickwick put on a pair of spectacles without any glass, rapped upon the table, hemmed, and having stared hard at Mr. Snodgrass, who was tilting back in his chair, till he arranged himself properly, began to read:

Augustus - Augusto

Winkle - extraer

hints - sugerencias; pista, indicio, indirecta, buscapié, toque

naturedly - con naturalidad

faults - fallas; defecto, falla, culpa, falta

comings - Vienes

spectacles - gafas; espectáculo, papelón

tilting - Inclinación; (tilt) Inclinación

"THE PICKWICK PORTFOLIO"

MAY 20, 18"

POET'S CORNER

ANNIVERSARY ODE

anniversary - aniversario

Ode - oda

Again we meet to celebrate

With badge and solemn rite,

badge - placa; insignia, pin, medalla, piocha, identificación

rite - verdad; rito

Our fifty-second anniversary,

In Pickwick Hall, tonight.

We all are here in perfect health,

None gone from our small band:

Again we see each well-known face,

And press each friendly hand.

Our Pickwick, always at his post,

With reverence we greet,

reverence - reverencia, veneración

As, spectacles on nose, he reads

Our well-filled weekly sheet.

Although he suffers from a cold,

We joy to hear him speak,

For words of wisdom from him fall,

In spite of croak or squeak.

squeak - chirriar; chirrido, rechinar

Old six-foot Snodgrass looms on high,

looms - elares; telar

With elephantine grace,

And beams upon the company,

beams - vigas; viga, timón, radio

With brown and jovial face.

Poetic fire lights up his eye,

poetic - poético

He struggles 'gainst his lot.

struggles - luchas; lucha, forcejeo, brega, luchar, esforzarse con denuedo

gainst - Contra

Behold ambition on his brow,

And on his nose, a blot.

blot - mancha, desdoro, emborronar, manchar

Next our peaceful Tupman comes,

So rosy, plump, and sweet,

Who chokes with laughter at the puns,

chokes - ahogos; ahogar, asfixiar

puns - juegos de palabras; juego de palabras, retruécano

And tumbles off his seat.

tumbles - vueltas; caída, caer, revolverse

Prim little Winkle too is here,

With every hair in place,

A model of propriety,

Though he hates to wash his face.

The year is gone, we still unite

unite - unirse; unir, aunar, juntar, combinar

To joke and laugh and read,

And tread the path of literature

That doth to glory lead.

glory - gloria

Long may our paper prosper well,

Prosper - prosperar

Our club unbroken be,

unbroken - intacto

And coming years their blessings pour

On the useful, gay ˜P. C.'.

A. SNODGRASS

THE MASKED MARRIAGE

masked - enmascarado; máscara, careta, mascarilla

(A Tale Of Venice)

Tale - cuento; historia, relato

Venice - Venecia

Gondola after gondola swept up to the marble steps, and left its lovely load to swell the brilliant throng that filled the stately halls of Count Adelon. Knights and ladies, elves and pages, monks and flower girls, all mingled gaily in the dance.

gondola - góndola, teleférico

marble - mármol, canica, balita

load - cargar; carga

swell - genial; hinchar(se), inflar(se)

throng - una multitud; muchedumbre, gentío, caterva, multitud, montón

Knights - caballeros; caballero

monks - monjes; monje

mingled - mezclados; mezclar

gaily - con alegría

Sweet voices and rich melody filled the air, and so with mirth and music the masquerade went on. "Has your Highness seen the Lady Viola tonight?" asked a gallant troubadour of the fairy queen who floated down the hall upon his arm.

mirth - felicidad, alegría, júbilo

Highness - alteza

troubadour - trovador, trovadora

floated - flotó; flotar, carroza

"Yes, is she not lovely, though so sad! Her dress is well chosen, too, for in a week she weds Count Antonio, whom she passionately hates."

weds - se casa; casar

"By my faith, I envy him. Yonder he comes, arrayed like a bridegroom, except the black mask. When that is off we shall see how he regards the fair maid whose heart he cannot win, though her stern father bestows her hand," returned the troubadour.

yonder - de allá, aquel, aquella

arrayed - arreglado; atavío, galas, distribución, ristra, gama, vector

bridegroom - novio

mask - máscara, careta, mascarilla

regards - saludos; considerar

bestows - otorga; guardar, estibar, depositar, alojar, acordar, conceder

"Tis whispered that she loves the young English artist who haunts her steps, and is spurned by the old Count," said the lady, as they joined the dance. The revel was at its height when a priest appeared, and withdrawing the young pair to an alcove, hung with purple velvet, he motioned them to kneel.

haunts - recuerdos; frecuentar, espantar, desasosegar, inquietar

spurned - despreciado; desdenar, patada

withdrawing - retirarse; retirar(se)

alcove - lcoba; hornacina, hueco, nicho

motioned - movimiento, moción

kneel - arrodillarse

Instant silence fell on the gay throng, and not a sound, but the dash of fountains or the rustle of orange groves sleeping in the moonlight, broke the hush, as Count de Adelon spoke thus:

fountains - fuentes; fuente, chafariz, fontana

rustle - susurro; crujido

moonlight - la luz de la luna; luz de la luna, lunada, pluriemplearse

"My lords and ladies, pardon the ruse by which I have gathered you here to witness the marriage of my daughter. Father, we wait your services." All eyes turned toward the bridal party, and a murmur of amazement went through the throng, for neither bride nor groom removed their masks.

lords - senores; castellano, senor

ruse - truco; asechanza, artimana, trácala, astucia

witness - Testigo

groom - novio; mozo de cuadra

masks - máscaras; máscara, careta, mascarilla

Curiosity and wonder possessed all hearts, but respect restrained all tongues till the holy rite was over. Then the eager spectators gathered round the count, demanding an explanation.

restrained - retenido; refrenar(se), contenerse

holy - santo, sagrado

spectators - espectadores; espectador

"Gladly would I give it if I could, but I only know that it was the whim of my timid Viola, and I yielded to it. Now, my children, let the play end. Unmask and receive my blessing."

whim - capricho

unmask - desenmascarar, descubrir, revelar, demostrar, desenmascararse

But neither bent the knee, for the young bridegroom replied in a tone that startled all listeners as the mask fell, disclosing the noble face of Ferdinand Devereux, the artist lover, and leaning on the breast where now flashed the star of an English earl was the lovely Viola, radiant with joy and beauty.

disclosing - revelar, divulgar

breast - pecho, seno, teta, corazón, pechuga

earl - conde

radiant with joy - radiante de alegría

"My lord, you scornfully bade me claim your daughter when I could boast as high a name and vast a fortune as the Count Antonio. I can do more, for even your ambitious soul cannot refuse the Earl of Devereux and De Vere, when he gives his ancient name and boundless wealth in return for the beloved hand of this fair lady, now my wife."

boast - presumir; vanagloriarse, jactarse de, fanfarronear

vast - vasta; vasto, enorme

boundless - ilimitado, sin límites

The count stood like one changed to stone, and turning to the bewildered crowd, Ferdinand added, with a gay smile of triumph, "To you, my gallant friends, I can only wish that your wooing may prosper as mine has done, and that you may all win as fair a bride as I have by this masked marriage."

bewildered - perplejo; confundir, desconcertar

triumph - triunfar; triunfo

wooing - Cortejando; (woo) Cortejando

S. PICKWICK

Why is the P. C. like the Tower of Babel?

It is full of unruly members.

unruly - ingobernable; revoltoso, descontrolado, incontrolable, díscolo

THE HISTORY OF A SQUASH

squash - calabaza; apretujar, aplastar

Once upon a time a farmer planted a little seed in his garden, and after a while it sprouted and became a vine and bore many squashes. One day in October, when they were ripe, he picked one and took it to market. A grocerman bought and put it in his shop. That same morning, a little girl in a brown hat and blue dress, with a round face and snub nose, went and bought it for her mother.

sprouted - erminado; brotar

vine - vid, trepadora, enredadera

squashes - calabazas; apretujar, aplastar

ripe - maduro

grocerman - el tendero

snub nose - Nariz respingona

She lugged it home, cut it up, and boiled it in the big pot, mashed some of it with salt and butter, for dinner. And to the rest she added a pint of milk, two eggs, four spoons of sugar, nutmeg, and some crackers, put it in a deep dish, and baked it till it was brown and nice, and next day it was eaten by a family named March.

lugged - llevado; arrastrar

mashed - puré; triturar, machacar

pint - una pinta; pinta

nutmeg - nuez moscada, cano, túnel

crackers - galletas; galleta, galleta de agua

T. TUPMAN

Mr. Pickwick, Sir:"

Yours respectably,

respectably - respetablemente, dignamente

N. WINKLE

[The above is a manly and handsome acknowledgment of past misdemeanors. If our young friend studied punctuation, it would be well.]

manly - varonil, viril

acknowledgment - reconocimiento, reconocimiento

misdemeanors - delitos menores; contravención, falta, mala conducta

punctuation - puntuación

A SAD ACCIDENT

On Friday last, we were startled by a violent shock in our basement, followed by cries of distress. On rushing in a body to the cellar, we discovered our beloved President prostrate upon the floor, having tripped and fallen while getting wood for domestic purposes. A perfect scene of ruin met our eyes, for in his fall Mr.

shock - conmoción, golpe

basement - sótano, zócalo

distress - aflicción, angustia, desasosiego, ansiedad

rushing - Prisa; (rush) Prisa

prostrate - postrado, acostado boca abajo

domestic - doméstico, nacional, empleada doméstica, empleada, malos tratos

ruin - ruina, desbaratar, arruinar, estropear, dar al traste

Pickwick had plunged his head and shoulders into a tub of water, upset a keg of soft soap upon his manly form, and torn his garments badly. On being removed from this perilous situation, it was discovered that he had suffered no injury but several bruises, and we are happy to add, is now doing well.

plunged - se hundió; lanzarse, zambullirse, tirarse de cabeza

tub - cuba, tina

keg - barril

soft soap - jabón suave

garments - prendas de vestir; prenda, prenda de vestir

perilous - peligroso

bruises - moretones; magullar, contusionar, mazar, machacar, macarse

ED.

THE PUBLIC BEREAVEMENT

bereavement - duelo, luto

It is our painful duty to record the sudden and mysterious disappearance of our cherished friend, Mrs. Snowball Pat Paw. This lovely and beloved cat was the pet of a large circle of warm and admiring friends; for her beauty attracted all eyes, her graces and virtues endeared her to all hearts, and her loss is deeply felt by the whole community.

disappearance - desaparición

paw - pata, garra (gato), zarpa (león)

endeared - amado; hacerse querer

When last seen, she was sitting at the gate, watching the butcher's cart, and it is feared that some villain, tempted by her charms, basely stole her. Weeks have passed, but no trace of her has been discovered, and we relinquish all hope, tie a black ribbon to her basket, set aside her dish, and weep for her as one lost to us forever.

butcher - carnicero; (butch) carnicero

cart - carro, carreta

tempted - tentado; tentar

trace - rastrear; rastro, huella, vestigio, indicio

relinquish - abandonar, renunciar, soltar, desistir

A sympathizing friend sends the following gem:

sympathizing - simpatizar

gem - joya, alhaja, piedra preciosa, gema

A lament

lament - lamento

FOR S. B. PAT PAW

We mourn the loss of our little pet,

mourn - lamentar, estar de luto

And sigh o'er her hapless fate,

er - r; em

hapless - desventurado; infeliz, infortunado, desgraciado

For never more by the fire she'll sit,

Nor play by the old green gate.

The little grave where her infant sleeps

infant - nino; nene, infante

Is 'neath the chestnut tree.

But o'er her grave we may not weep,

We know not where it may be.

Her empty bed, her idle ball,

Will never see her more;

No gentle tap, no loving purr

tap - golpear; golpecito, palmadita

purr - ronronear, ronroneo

Is heard at the parlor door.

Another cat comes after her mice,

A cat with a dirty face,

But she does not hunt as our darling did,

darling - carino; querido, querida, amado, amada

Nor play with her airy grace.

Her stealthy paws tread the very hall

stealthy - sigiloso, furtivo

paws - patas; pata, garra (gato), zarpa (león)

Where Snowball used to play,

But she only spits at the dogs our pet

spits - Escupir

So gallantly drove away.

gallantly - con gallardía

She is useful and mild, and does her best,

But she is not fair to see,

And we cannot give her your place dear,

Nor worship her as we worship thee.

worship - adoración, culto, checkalabanza, adorar, checkvenerar

A.S.

ADVERTISEMENTS

MISS ORANTHY BLUGGAGE, the accomplished strong-minded lecturer, will deliver her famous lecture on "WOMAN AND HER POSITION" at Pickwick Hall, next Saturday Evening, after the usual performances.

Lecturer - profesor; docente, docente

A WEEKLY MEETING will be held at Kitchen Place, to teach young ladies how to cook. Hannah Brown will preside, and all are invited to attend.

preside - presidir

THE DUSTPAN SOCIETY will meet on Wednesday next, and parade in the upper story of the Club House. All members to appear in uniform and shoulder their brooms at nine precisely.

Dustpan - recogedor

parade - desfile

brooms - escobas; escoba

precisely - exactamente; precisamente

MRS. BETH BOUNCER will open her new assortment of Doll's Millinery next week. The latest Paris fashions have arrived, and orders are respectfully solicited.

Bouncer - portero, gorila

assortment - surtido, variedad, colección

millinery - una sombrerería; boneteria

respectfully - con respeto; respetuosamente

solicited - solicitado; solicitar, cortejar

A NEW PLAY will appear at the Barnville Theatre, in the course of a few weeks, which will surpass anything ever seen on the American stage. "THE GREEK SLAVE, or Constantine the Avenger," is the name of this thrilling drama!!!

surpass - sobrepasar, superar, aventajar

slave - esclavo, esclava, checkesclava

avenger - vengador, vengadora

HINTS

If S.P. didn't use so much soap on his hands, he wouldn't always be late at breakfast. A.S. is requested not to whistle in the street. T.T. please don't forget Amy's napkin. N.W. must not fret because his dress has not nine tucks.

WEEKLY REPORT

Meg"Good.

Jo"Bad.

Beth"Very Good.

Amy"Middling.

As the President finished reading the paper (which I beg leave to assure my readers is a bona fide copy of one written by bona fide girls once upon a time), a round of applause followed, and then Mr. Snodgrass rose to make a proposition.

beg leave - pedir permiso

fide - ide

proposition - propuesta, proposición

"Mr. President and gentlemen," he began, assuming a parliamentary attitude and tone, "I wish to propose the admission of a new member"one who highly deserves the honor, would be deeply grateful for it, and would add immensely to the spirit of the club, the literary value of the paper, and be no end jolly and nice. I propose Mr. Theodore Laurence as an honorary member of the P. C. Come now, do have him."

parliamentary - parlamentaria; parlamentario

propose - proponer, pedir la mano, pedir matrimonio, proponer matrimonio

admission - admisión, admisión, confesión

deserves - merecer, meritar

honorary member - miembro honorario

Come now - venir ahora

Jo's sudden change of tone made the girls laugh, but all looked rather anxious, and no one said a word as Snodgrass took his seat.

"We'll put it to a vote," said the President. "All in favor of this motion please to manifest it by saying, ˜Aye'."

motion - movimiento, moción

manifest - manifiesto, evidente, declaración de carga, sobordo

Aye - Sí

A loud response from Snodgrass, followed, to everybody's surprise, by a timid one from Beth.

"Contrary-minded say, ˜No'."

contrary - contrario

Meg and Amy were contrary-minded, and Mr. Winkle rose to say with great elegance, "We don't wish any boys, they only joke and bounce about. This is a ladies'club, and we wish to be private and proper."

bounce - rebotar, rebote

"I'm afraid he'll laugh at our paper, and make fun of us afterward," observed Pickwick, pulling the little curl on her forehead, as she always did when doubtful.

little curl - pequeno rizo

doubtful - dudoso

Up rose Snodgrass, very much in earnest. "Sir, I give you my word as a gentleman, Laurie won't do anything of the sort. He likes to write, and he'll give a tone to our contributions and keep us from being sentimental, don't you see? We can do so little for him, and he does so much for us, I think the least we can do is to offer him a place here, and make him welcome if he comes."

contributions - contribuciones; contribución, aporte, cotización

This artful allusion to benefits conferred brought Tupman to his feet, looking as if he had quite made up his mind.

artful - inteligente; diestro, hábil, habiloso, ingenioso, astuto

allusion - alusión

conferred - conferido; conferir, debatir, consultar

"Yes; we ought to do it, even if we are afraid. I say he may come, and his grandpa, too, if he likes."

This spirited burst from Beth electrified the club, and Jo left her seat to shake hands approvingly. "Now then, vote again. Everybody remember it's our Laurie, and say, ˜Aye!'" cried Snodgrass excitedly.

electrified - electrificado; electrificar, electrizar

approvingly - con aprobación

"Aye! Aye! Aye!" replied three voices at once.

"Good! Bless you! Now, as there's nothing like ˜taking time by the fetlock', as Winkle characteristically observes, allow me to present the new member." And, to the dismay of the rest of the club, Jo threw open the door of the closet, and displayed Laurie sitting on a rag bag, flushed and twinkling with suppressed laughter.

fetlock - menudillo

characteristically - característicamente

observes - observar, seguir, tomar en cuenta

twinkling - parpadeando; (twinkle); titilar, fulgurar, refulgir

"You rogue! You traitor! Jo, how could you?" cried the three girls, as Snodgrass led her friend triumphantly forth, and producing both a chair and a badge, installed him in a jiffy.

rogue - canalla, granuja, vago

traitor - traidor, traidora

installed - instalado; instalar

jiffy - en un pispás

"The coolness of you two rascals is amazing," began Mr. Pickwick, trying to get up an awful frown and only succeeding in producing an amiable smile. But the new member was equal to the occasion, and rising, with a grateful salutation to the Chair, said in the most engaging manner, "Mr. President and ladies"I beg pardon, gentlemen"allow me to introduce myself as Sam Weller, the very humble servant of the club."

coolness - guay; frescura

engaging - atractivo; atraer, trabar conversación con, trabar batalla

beg pardon - Perdón

"Good! Good!" cried Jo, pounding with the handle of the old warming pan on which she leaned.

"My faithful friend and noble patron," continued Laurie with a wave of the hand, "who has so flatteringly presented me, is not to be blamed for the base stratagem of tonight. I planned it, and she only gave in after lots of teasing."

patron - patrón, mecenas, patrocinador, auspiciador, cliente, parroquiano

flatteringly - halagadoramente; lisonjeramente

stratagem - estratagema

teasing - Bromas; (teas) Bromas

"Come now, don't lay it all on yourself. You know I proposed the cupboard," broke in Snodgrass, who was enjoying the joke amazingly.

"Never mind what she says. I'm the wretch that did it, sir," said the new member, with a Welleresque nod to Mr. Pickwick. "But on my honor, I never will do so again, and henceforth devote myself to the interest of this immortal club."

immortal - inmortal, inmortal

"Hear! Hear!" cried Jo, clashing the lid of the warming pan like a cymbal.

clashing - Chocando; (clash); estruendo, escaramuza

cymbal - címbalo; plato -s, platos, platillo -s, platillos

"Go on, go on!" added Winkle and Tupman, while the President bowed benignly.

benignly - Benignamente

"I merely wish to say, that as a slight token of my gratitude for the honor done me, and as a means of promoting friendly relations between adjoining nations, I have set up a post office in the hedge in the lower corner of the garden, a fine, spacious building with padlocks on the doors and every convenience for the mails, also the females, if I may be allowed the expression.

token - sena, recuerdo, ficha, prenda, símbolo, simbólico, cosmético

adjoining - colindante; lindar

spacious - espacioso, desahogado, amplio

padlocks - candados; candado, candar, asegurar

convenience - conveniencia, comodidad

It's the old martin house, but I've stopped up the door and made the roof open, so it will hold all sorts of things, and save our valuable time. Letters, manuscripts, books, and bundles can be passed in there, and as each nation has a key, it will be uncommonly nice, I fancy. Allow me to present the club key, and with many thanks for your favor, take my seat."

Martin - Martín

manuscripts - manuscritos; manuscrito, manuscrito

uncommonly - inusualmente; extraordinariamente

Great applause as Mr. Weller deposited a little key on the table and subsided, the warming pan clashed and waved wildly, and it was some time before order could be restored. A long discussion followed, and everyone came out surprising, for everyone did her best. So it was an unusually lively meeting, and did not adjourn till a late hour, when it broke up with three shrill cheers for the new member.

deposited - epositado; depósito, empeno, depositar

restored - restaurado; restablecer, restaurar

adjourn - suspender, posponer, diferir, aplazar

The P. O. was a capital little institution, and flourished wonderfully, for nearly as many queer things passed through it as through the real post office. Tragedies and cravats, poetry and pickles, garden seeds and long letters, music and gingerbread, rubbers, invitations, scoldings, and puppies. The old gentleman liked the fun, and amused himself by sending odd bundles, mysterious messages, and funny telegrams, and his gardener, who was smitten with Hannah's charms, actually sent a love letter to Jo's care.

wonderfully - maravillosamente, a las mil maravillas

tragedies - ragedias; tragedia

cravats - corbatas; mascada

pickles - encurtidos; encurtido

scoldings - reprimendas; regano, sermón, bronca, rapapolvo

puppies - cachorros; cachorro, perrito

Telegrams - telegramas; telegrama

gardener - jardinero, jardinera

smitten - enamorado; golpear, cascar

love letter - Carta de amor

How they laughed when the secret came out, never dreaming how many love letters that little post office would hold in the years to come.

CHAPTER ELEVEN. EXPERIMENTS

"The first of June! The Kings are off to the seashore tomorrow, and I'm free. Three months'vacation"how I shall enjoy it!" exclaimed Meg, coming home one warm day to find Jo laid upon the sofa in an unusual state of exhaustion, while Beth took off her dusty boots, and Amy made lemonade for the refreshment of the whole party.

seashore - la orilla del mar; litoral, costa

exhaustion - agotamiento, cansancio

"Aunt March went today, for which, oh, be joyful!" said Jo. "I was mortally afraid she'd ask me to go with her. If she had, I should have felt as if I ought to do it, but Plumfield is about as gay as a churchyard, you know, and I'd rather be excused. We had a flurry getting the old lady off, and I had a fright every time she spoke to me, for I was in such a hurry to be through that I was uncommonly helpful and sweet, and feared she'd find it impossible to part from me. I quaked till she was fairly in the carriage, and had a final fright, for as it drove of, she popped out her head, saying, ˜Josyphine, won't you"?

mortally - Mortalmente

excused - disculpado; excusar, perdonar, panish: t-needed

I didn't hear any more, for I basely turned and fled. I did actually run, and whisked round the corner where I felt safe."

"Poor old Jo! She came in looking as if bears were after her," said Beth, as she cuddled her sister's feet with a motherly air.

"Aunt March is a regular samphire, is she not?" observed Amy, tasting her mixture critically.

samphire - salicornia

critically - críticamente

"She means vampire, not seaweed, but It doesn't matter. It's too warm to be particular about one's parts of speech," murmured Jo.

vampire - vampiro

seaweed - algas

It doesn't matter - No importa

"What shall you do all your vacation?" asked Amy, changing the subject with tact.

"I shall lie abed late, and do nothing," replied Meg, from the depths of the rocking chair. "I've been routed up early all winter and had to spend my days working for other people, so now I'm going to rest and revel to my heart's content."

abed - en cama, acostado

"No," said Jo, "that dozy way wouldn't suit me. I've laid in a heap of books, and I'm going to improve my shining hours reading on my perch in the old apple tree, when I'm not having l"""

dozy - perezoso; adormecido

laid in - recoger

heap - pila, montón, cúmulo, montículo, checkpila, amontonar

apple tree - manzano

"Don't say ˜larks!'" implored Amy, as a return snub for the ˜samphire'correction.

snub - un desaire; ofender

correction - corrección

"I'll say ˜nightingales'then, with Laurie. That's proper and appropriate, since he's a warbler."

nightingales - los ruisenores; ruisenor

warbler - curruca, aranero, chipe, reinita

"Don't let us do any lessons, Beth, for a while, but play all the time and rest, as the girls mean to," proposed Amy.

"Well, I will, if Mother doesn't mind. I want to learn some new songs, and my children need fitting up for the summer. They are dreadfully out of order and really suffering for clothes."

"May we, Mother?" asked Meg, turning to Mrs. March, who sat sewing in what they called ˜Marmee's corner'.

"You may try your experiment for a week and see how you like it. I think by Saturday night you will find that all play and no work is as bad as all work and no play."

"Oh, dear, no! It will be delicious, I'm sure," said Meg complacently.

complacently - Complacientemente

"I now propose a toast, as my ˜friend and pardner, Sairy Gamp', says. Fun forever, and no grubbing!" cried Jo, rising, glass in hand, as the lemonade went round.

pardner - Companero

grubbing - robar; larva, verme, manduca, manducatoria, condumio

They all drank it merrily, and began the experiment by lounging for the rest of the day. Next morning, Meg did not appear till ten o'clock. Her solitary breakfast did not taste good, and the room seemed lonely and untidy, for Jo had not filled the vases, Beth had not dusted, and Amy's books lay scattered about. Nothing was neat and pleasant but ˜Marmee's corner', which looked as usual. And there Meg sat, to ˜rest and read', which meant to yawn and imagine what pretty summer dresses she would get with her salary. Jo spent the morning on the river with Laurie and the afternoon reading and crying over The Wide, Wide World, up in the apple tree. Beth began by rummaging everything out of the big closet where her family resided, but getting tired before half done, she left her establishment topsy-turvy and went to her music, rejoicing that she had no dishes to wash.

lounging - Descansando; (lounge); relajarse, sala de estar, estancia

untidy - desordenado; descuidado, desorganizado

vases - jarrones; jarrón, florero, vasija

yawn - bostezar, abrirse, bostezo

summer dresses - vestidos de verano

rummaging - rebuscando; revolver

resided - Residuos

half done - hecho a medias; persona muy baja

establishment - establecimiento, establishment

rejoicing - alegría; (rejoice); alegrarse, regocijarse

Amy arranged her bower, put on her best white frock, smoothed her curls, and sat down to draw under the honeysuckle, hoping someone would see and inquire who the young artist was. As no one appeared but an inquisitive daddy-longlegs, who examined her work with interest, she went to walk, got caught in a shower, and came home dripping.

inquisitive - inquisitivo, curioso

daddy - papá, papito, papaíto, papi

longlegs - Pierna larga

At teatime they compared notes, and all agreed that it had been a delightful, though unusually long day. Meg, who went shopping in the afternoon and got a ˜sweet blue muslin', had discovered, after she had cut the breadths off, that it wouldn't wash, which mishap made her slightly cross. Jo had burned the skin off her nose boating, and got a raging headache by reading too long. Beth was worried by the confusion of her closet and the difficulty of learning three or four songs at once, and Amy deeply regretted the damage done her frock, for Katy Brown's party was to be the next day and now like Flora McFlimsey, she had ˜nothing to wear'. But these were mere trifles, and they assured their mother that the experiment was working finely. She smiled, said nothing, and with Hannah's help did their neglected work, keeping home pleasant and the domestic machinery running smoothly. It was astonishing what a peculiar and uncomfortable state of things was produced by the ˜resting and reveling'process. The days kept getting longer and longer, the weather was unusually variable and so were tempers; an unsettled feeling possessed everyone, and Satan found plenty of mischief for the idle hands to do. As the height of luxury, Meg put out some of her sewing, and then found time hang so heavily, that she fell to snipping and spoiling her clothes in her attempts to furbish them up a la Moffat.

raging - enfurecido; rabia, furor

Flora - flora

mere - simple, mero

assured - asegurado; (assure); asegurar

finely - Finamente

astonishing - asombroso; asombrar, sorprender, pasmar

reveling - regocijándose; deleitarse

variable - variable, variable

Satan - Satanás, Satán

snipping - Recortes; (snip); cortar

spoiling - arruinando; expoliar, despojar, danar, arruinar, echar a perder

attempts - intentos; intentar, tentativa, intento, ensayo

Jo read till her eyes gave out and she was sick of books, got so fidgety that even good-natured Laurie had a quarrel with her, and so reduced in spirits that she desperately wished she had gone with Aunt March. Beth got on pretty well, for she was constantly forgetting that it was to be all play and no work, and fell back into her old ways now and then. But something in the air affected her, and more than once her tranquility was much disturbed, so much so that on one occasion she actually shook poor dear Joanna and told her she was ˜a fright'. Amy fared worst of all, for her resources were small, and when her sisters left her to amuse herself, she soon found that accomplished and important little self a great burden. She didn't like dolls, fairy tales were childish, and one couldn't draw all the time. Tea parties didn't amount to much, neither did picnics, unless very well conducted. "If one could have a fine house, full of nice girls, or go traveling, the summer would be delightful, but to stay at home with three selfish sisters and a grown-up boy was enough to try the patience of a Boaz," complained Miss Malaprop, after several days devoted to pleasure, fretting, and ennui.

picnics - picnics; jira, pícnic

conducted - conducido; conducción, conducta, guiar, dirigir, manejar

devoted - Devoto

ennui - entusiasmo; tedio, hastío, apatía, melancolía

No one would own that they were tired of the experiment, but by Friday night each acknowledged to herself that she was glad the week was nearly done. Hoping to impress the lesson more deeply, Mrs. March, who had a good deal of humor, resolved to finish off the trial in an appropriate manner, so she gave Hannah a holiday and let the girls enjoy the full effect of the play system.

acknowledged - reconocido; reconocer, acusar recibo

impress - impresionar, impresión, impresión

When they got up on Saturday morning, there was no fire in the kitchen, no breakfast in the dining room, and no mother anywhere to be seen.

dining - cenar

"Mercy on us! What has happened?" cried Jo, staring about her in dismay.

Meg ran upstairs and soon came back again, looking relieved but rather bewildered, and a little ashamed.

"Mother isn't sick, only very tired, and she says she is going to stay quietly in her room all day and let us do the best we can. It's a very queer thing for her to do, she doesn't act a bit like herself. But she says it has been a hard week for her, so we mustn't grumble but take care of ourselves."

"That's easy enough, and I like the idea, I'm aching for something to do, that is, some new amusement, you know," added Jo quickly.

aching - te duele; adolorido; (ache) te duele; adolorido

In fact it was an immense relief to them all to have a little work, and they took hold with a will, but soon realized the truth of Hannah's saying, "Housekeeping ain't no joke." There was plenty of food in the larder, and while Beth and Amy set the table, Meg and Jo got breakfast, wondering as they did why servants ever talked about hard work.

relief - alivio

larder - la despensa; despensa, alacena

"I shall take some up to Mother, though she said we were not to think of her, for she'd take care of herself," said Meg, who presided and felt quite matronly behind the teapot.

presided - presidió; presidir

matronly - matronal, panish: t-needed

teapot - tetera

So a tray was fitted out before anyone began, and taken up with the cook's compliments. The boiled tea was very bitter, the omelet scorched, and the biscuits speckled with saleratus, but Mrs. March received her repast with thanks and laughed heartily over it after Jo was gone.

tray - bandeja

fitted out - equipado con; provisto de

omelet - Tortilla

repast - un banquete

"Poor little souls, they will have a hard time, I'm afraid, but they won't suffer, and it will do them good," she said, producing the more palatable viands with which she had provided herself, and disposing of the bad breakfast, so that their feelings might not be hurt, a motherly little deception for which they were grateful.

souls - almas; alma, espíritu

more palatable - Más apetitoso/sabroso

disposing - Deshacerse; (dispose); deshacerse

deception - engano; engano, socalina

Many were the complaints below, and great the chagrin of the head cook at her failures. "Never mind, I'll get the dinner and be servant, you be mistress, keep your hands nice, see company, and give orders," said Jo, who knew still less than Meg about culinary affairs.

chagrin - disgusto, pesar, mortificar

head cook - cocinero jefe

Mistress - senora; duena, maestra, querida, amante, barragana, manceba, ama

culinary - culinario

This obliging offer was gladly accepted, and Margaret retired to the parlor, which she hastily put in order by whisking the litter under the sofa and shutting the blinds to save the trouble of dusting. Jo, with perfect faith in her own powers and a friendly desire to make up the quarrel, immediately put a note in the office, inviting Laurie to dinner.

litter - litera, artolas, camada, cama, lecho, detritus, basura

blinds - persianas; ciego, invidente, celosía, persiana, ciega, ciego

"You'd better see what you have got before you think of having company," said Meg, when informed of the hospitable but rash act.

hospitable - hospitalario

rash - sarpullido; imprudente

"Oh, there's corned beef and plenty of potatoes, and I shall get some asparagus and a lobster, ˜for a relish', as Hannah says. We'll have lettuce and make a salad. I don't know how, but the book tells. I'll have blanc mange and strawberries for dessert, and coffee too, if you want to be elegant."

corned - en conserva; cereales (maíz, trigo, avena)

asparagus - espárragos; espárrago

Lobster - langosta, bogavante

relish - saborear

lettuce - lechuga

strawberries - fresas; fresa, frutilla

dessert - dulce, postre

"Don't try too many messes, Jo, for you can't make anything but gingerbread and molasses candy fit to eat. I wash my hands of the dinner party, and since you have asked Laurie on your own responsibility, you may just take care of him."

molasses - melaza; (molas) melaza

"I don't want you to do anything but be civil to him and help to the pudding. You'll give me your advice if I get in a muddle, won't you?" asked Jo, rather hurt.

civil - civil

pudding - pudin, pudín

muddle - enredo; mezclar, confundir, embrollar, zarabutear, machacar

"Yes, but I don't know much, except about bread and a few trifles. You had better ask Mother's leave before you order anything," returned Meg prudently.

prudently - con prudencia; prudentemente

"Of course I shall. I'm not a fool." And Jo went off in a huff at the doubts expressed of her powers.

"Get what you like, and don't disturb me. I'm going out to dinner and can't worry about things at home," said Mrs. March, when Jo spoke to her. "I never enjoyed housekeeping, and I'm going to take a vacation today, and read, write, go visiting, and amuse myself."

The unusual spectacle of her busy mother rocking comfortably and reading early in the morning made Jo feel as if some unnatural phenomenon had occurred, for an eclipse, an earthquake, or a volcanic eruption would hardly have seemed stranger.

spectacle - espectáculo, papelón

unnatural - no es natural; antinatural, contranatural, contra natura

phenomenon - fenómeno

eclipse - eclipse, eclipsar

volcanic - volcánica; volcánico

eruption - erupción

"Everything is out of sorts, somehow," she said to herself, going downstairs. "There's Beth crying, that's a sure sign that something is wrong in this family. If Amy is bothering, I'll shake her."

Feeling very much out of sorts herself, Jo hurried into the parlor to find Beth sobbing over Pip, the canary, who lay dead in the cage with his little claws pathetically extended, as if imploring the food for want of which he had died.

pip - pepita

Canary - canario

cage - jaula, cabina, enjaular

claws - garras; garra

extended - extendido; extender, ampliar

"It's all my fault, I forgot him, there isn't a seed or a drop left. Oh, Pip! Oh, Pip! How could I be so cruel to you?" cried Beth, taking the poor thing in her hands and trying to restore him.

Jo peeped into his half-open eye, felt his little heart, and finding him stiff and cold, shook her head, and offered her domino box for a coffin.

half-open - (half-open) medio abierto

domino - dominó

coffin - ataúd, féretro, cajón

"Put him in the oven, and maybe he will get warm and revive," said Amy hopefully.

revive - revivir

"He's been starved, and he shan't be baked now he's dead. I'll make him a shroud, and he shall be buried in the garden, and I'll never have another bird, never, my Pip! for I am too bad to own one," murmured Beth, sitting on the floor with her pet folded in her hands.

starved - muerto de hambre; morir de hambre, hambrear

shroud - mortaja

"The funeral shall be this afternoon, and we will all go. Now, don't cry, Bethy. It's a pity, but nothing goes right this week, and Pip has had the worst of the experiment. Make the shroud, and lay him in my box, and after the dinner party, we'll have a nice little funeral," said Jo, beginning to feel as if she had undertaken a good deal.

funeral - funeral

undertaken - emprendido; emprender, acometer

Leaving the others to console Beth, she departed to the kitchen, which was in a most discouraging state of confusion. Putting on a big apron, she fell to work and got the dishes piled up ready for washing, when she discovered that the fire was out.

discouraging - desalentador; descorazonar, acobardar, desalentar, persuadir

"Here's a sweet prospect!" muttered Jo, slamming the stove door open, and poking vigorously among the cinders.

poking - pinchando; meter

vigorously - enérgicamente; vigorosamente

cinders - cenizas; ceniza, escoria, incinerar

Having rekindled the fire, she thought she would go to market while the water heated. The walk revived her spirits, and flattering herself that she had made good bargains, she trudged home again, after buying a very young lobster, some very old asparagus, and two boxes of acid strawberries. By the time she got cleared up, the dinner arrived and the stove was red-hot.

revived - evivido; revivir

bargains - gangas; trato, ganga, bicoca, chollo, regatear

acid - agrio, ácido, malhumorado, ácido

Hannah had left a pan of bread to rise, Meg had worked it up early, set it on the hearth for a second rising, and forgotten it. Meg was entertaining Sallie Gardiner in the parlor, when the door flew open and a floury, crocky, flushed, and disheveled figure appeared, demanding tartly...

floury - harinoso

tartly - tartamente

"I say, isn't bread ˜riz'enough when it runs over the pans?"

runs over - derramarse; repasar; Atropellar

Sallie began to laugh, but Meg nodded and lifted her eyebrows as high as they would go, which caused the apparition to vanish and put the sour bread into the oven without further delay. Mrs. March went out, after peeping here and there to see how matters went, also saying a word of comfort to Beth, who sat making a winding sheet, while the dear departed lay in state in the domino box. A strange sense of helplessness fell upon the girls as the gray bonnet vanished round the corner, and despair seized them when a few minutes later Miss Crocker appeared, and said she'd come to dinner.

winding - Devanado; (wind) Devanado

Now this lady was a thin, yellow spinster, with a sharp nose and inquisitive eyes, who saw everything and gossiped about all she saw. They disliked her, but had been taught to be kind to her, simply because she was old and poor and had few friends. So Meg gave her the easy chair and tried to entertain her, while she asked questions, criticized everything, and told stories of the people whom she knew.

spinster - solterona, quedada

gossiped - cotilleaba; chismoso, chismosa, chisme, chismear, cotillear

Language cannot describe the anxieties, experiences, and exertions which Jo underwent that morning, and the dinner she served up became a standing joke. Fearing to ask any more advice, she did her best alone, and discovered that something more than energy and good will is necessary to make a cook.

anxieties - nsiedades; zozobra, ansiedad, inquietud

underwent - ufrió; experimentar, sufrir, soportar, padecer

She boiled the asparagus for an hour and was grieved to find the heads cooked off and the stalks harder than ever. The bread burned black; for the salad dressing so aggravated her that she could not make it fit to eat. The lobster was a scarlet mystery to her, but she hammered and poked till it was unshelled and its meager proportions concealed in a grove of lettuce leaves. The potatoes had to be hurried, not to keep the asparagus waiting, and were not done at the last. The blanc mange was lumpy, and the strawberries not as ripe as they looked, having been skilfully ˜deaconed'.

stalks - tallos; tallo

salad dressing - aderezo para la ensalada

aggravated - agravado; agravar, empeorar, irritar, exasperar, sublevar

hammered - martillado; martillo, percutor, malleus, martillar

unshelled - Descascarar

meager - pobre, escaso, deficiente

proportions - proporciones; proporción

concealed - ocultos; esconder, ocultar

grove - arboleda

lumpy - gordinflón; grumoso

skilfully - con habilidad

deaconed - diácono

"Well, they can eat beef and bread and butter, if they are hungry, only it's mortifying to have to spend your whole morning for nothing," thought Jo, as she rang the bell half an hour later than usual, and stood, hot, tired, and dispirited, surveying the feast spread before Laurie, accustomed to all sorts of elegance, and Miss Crocker, whose tattling tongue would report them far and wide.

tattling - Chismoso; (tattle); charlotear, delatar, soplar

Poor Jo would gladly have gone under the table, as one thing after another was tasted and left, while Amy giggled, Meg looked distressed, Miss Crocker pursed her lips, and Laurie talked and laughed with all his might to give a cheerful tone to the festive scene. Jo's one strong point was the fruit, for she had sugared it well, and had a pitcher of rich cream to eat with it. Her hot cheeks cooled a trifle, and she drew a long breath as the pretty glass plates went round, and everyone looked graciously at the little rosy islands floating in a sea of cream.

pursed - Pers

Pitcher - Cántaro

graciously - con amabilidad

floating - flotante, flotador; (float); flotar, carroza

Miss Crocker tasted first, made a wry face, and drank some water hastily. Jo, who refused, thinking there might not be enough, for they dwindled sadly after the picking over, glanced at Laurie, but he was eating away manfully, though there was a slight pucker about his mouth and he kept his eye fixed on his plate. Amy, who was fond of delicate fare, took a heaping spoonful, choked, hid her face in her napkin, and left the table precipitately.

wry - irónico

pucker - arrugar, arruga

heaping - un montón; pila, montón, cúmulo, montículo, checkpila, amontonar

spoonful - cucharada

choked - ahogado; ahogar, asfixiar

precipitately - precipitadamente

"Oh, what is it?" exclaimed Jo, trembling.

"Salt instead of sugar, and the cream is sour," replied Meg with a tragic gesture.

tragic - trágico

Jo uttered a groan and fell back in her chair, remembering that she had given a last hasty powdering to the berries out of one of the two boxes on the kitchen table, and had neglected to put the milk in the refrigerator. She turned scarlet and was on the verge of crying, when she met Laurie's eyes, which would look merry in spite of his heroic efforts.

uttered - ronunciado; absoluto, total

berries - bayas; baya

refrigerator - frigorífico

verge - margen, borde; arcén

heroic - heroico

The comical side of the affair suddenly struck her, and she laughed till the tears ran down her cheeks. So did everyone else, even ˜Croaker'as the girls called the old lady, and the unfortunate dinner ended gaily, with bread and butter, olives and fun.

olives - aceitunas; aceituna, oliva, olivo, verde oliva, aceitunado

"I haven't strength of mind enough to clear up now, so we will sober ourselves with a funeral," said Jo, as they rose, and Miss Crocker made ready to go, being eager to tell the new story at another friend's dinner table.

They did sober themselves for Beth's sake. Laurie dug a grave under the ferns in the grove, little Pip was laid in, with many tears by his tender-hearted mistress, and covered with moss, while a wreath of violets and chickweed was hung on the stone which bore his epitaph, composed by Jo while she struggled with the dinner.

sake - por, por motivo de; por el bien de

moss - musgo

wreath - guirnalda, corona, burelete, rodear

violets - violetas; violeta

epitaph - epitafio

struggled - luchado; lucha, forcejeo, brega, luchar, esforzarse con denuedo

Here lies Pip March,

Who died the 7th of June;

Loved and lamented sore,

lamented - lamentó; lamento, lamentación, lamentar

sore - dolorido; doloroso

And not forgotten soon.

At the conclusion of the ceremonies, Beth retired to her room, overcome with emotion and lobster, but there was no place of repose, for the beds were not made, and she found her grief much assuaged by beating up the pillows and putting things in order. Meg helped Jo clear away the remains of the feast, which took half the afternoon and left them so tired that they agreed to be contented with tea and toast for supper.

repose - reposo

assuaged - paciguado; calmar, ain, apaciguar, sosegar

beating up - Golpear

clear away - despejar, quitar

Laurie took Amy to drive, which was a deed of charity, for the sour cream seemed to have had a bad effect upon her temper. Mrs. March came home to find the three older girls hard at work in the middle of the afternoon, and a glance at the closet gave her an idea of the success of one part of the experiment.

deed - hecho, acto, acción, obra, hazana; (dee); hecho, acto, acción

Before the housewives could rest, several people called, and there was a scramble to get ready to see them. Then tea must be got, errands done, and one or two necessary bits of sewing neglected until the last minute. As twilight fell, dewy and still, one by one they gathered on the porch where the June roses were budding beautifully, and each groaned or sighed as she sat down, as if tired or troubled.

housewives - amas de casa; ama de casa

scramble - discutir; gatear, revolver, arrebato, arrebatina

errands - recados; recado

porch - pórtico, porche

"What a dreadful day this has been!" began Jo, usually the first to speak.

"It has seemed shorter than usual, but so uncomfortable," said Meg.

"Not a bit like home," added Amy.

"It can't seem so without Marmee and little Pip," sighed Beth, glancing with full eyes at the empty cage above her head.

"Here's Mother, dear, and you shall have another bird tomorrow, if you want it."

As she spoke, Mrs. March came and took her place among them, looking as if her holiday had not been much pleasanter than theirs.

"Are you satisfied with your experiment, girls, or do you want another week of it?" she asked, as Beth nestled up to her and the rest turned toward her with brightening faces, as flowers turn toward the sun.

"I don't!" cried Jo decidedly.

"Nor I," echoed the others.

echoed - resonó; eco, repercutir, repetir, hacer eco

"You think then, that it is better to have a few duties and live a little for others, do you?"

"Lounging and larking doesn't pay," observed Jo, shaking her head. "I'm tired of it and mean to go to work at something right off."

larking - larking; alondra

"Suppose you learn plain cooking. That's a useful accomplishment, which no woman should be without," said Mrs. March, laughing inaudibly at the recollection of Jo's dinner party, for she had met Miss Crocker and heard her account of it.

accomplishment - logro, éxito

inaudibly - Inaudiblemente

recollection - Recuerdo

"Mother, did you go away and let everything be, just to see how we'd get on?" cried Meg, who had had suspicions all day.

suspicions - sospechas; sospecha, suspicacia

"Yes, I wanted you to see how the comfort of all depends on each doing her share faithfully. While Hannah and I did your work, you got on pretty well, though I don't think you were very happy or amiable. So I thought, as a little lesson, I would show you what happens when everyone thinks only of herself. Don't you feel that it is pleasanter to help one another, to have daily duties which make leisure sweet when it comes, and to bear and forbear, that home may be comfortable and lovely to us all?

forbear - soportar

"We do, Mother, we do!" cried the girls.

"Then let me advise you to take up your little burdens again, for though they seem heavy sometimes, they are good for us, and lighten as we learn to carry them. Work is wholesome, and there is plenty for everyone. It keeps us from ennui and mischief, is good for health and spirits, and gives us a sense of power and independence better than money or fashion."

lighten - Aligerar

wholesome - saludable, sano, íntegro

"We'll work like bees, and love it too, see if we don't," said Jo. "I'll learn plain cooking for my holiday task, and the next dinner party I have shall be a success."

"I'll make the set of shirts for father, instead of letting you do it, Marmee. I can and I will, though I'm not fond of sewing. That will be better than fussing over my own things, which are plenty nice enough as they are." said Meg.

"I'll do my lessons every day, and not spend so much time with my music and dolls. I am a stupid thing, and ought to be studying, not playing," was Beth's resolution, while Amy followed their example by heroically declaring, "I shall learn to make buttonholes, and attend to my parts of speech."

buttonholes - ojales; ojal, cazar al espartillo

"Very good! Then I am quite satisfied with the experiment, and fancy that we shall not have to repeat it, only don't go to the other extreme and delve like slaves. Have regular hours for work and play, make each day both useful and pleasant, and prove that you understand the worth of time by employing it well. Then youth will be delightful, old age will bring few regrets, and life become a beautiful success, in spite of poverty."

delve - rofundizar

slaves - esclavos; esclavo, esclava, checkesclava

regrets - se arrepiente; lamentar, pena, pesar, arrepentimiento

"We'll remember, Mother!" and they did.

CHAPTER TWELVE. CAMP LAURENCE

Beth was postmistress, for, being most at home, she could attend to it regularly, and dearly liked the daily task of unlocking the little door and distributing the mail. One July day she came in with her hands full, and went about the house leaving letters and parcels like the penny post.

daily task - tarea diaria

unlocking - desbloqueo; abrir, abrir con llave, desatrancar, desbloquear

distributing - distribuyendo; distribuir, repartir

parcels - paquetes; paquete, parcela, hatajo, embalar, parcelar

"Here's your posy, Mother! Laurie never forgets that," she said, putting the fresh nosegay in the vase that stood in ˜Marmee's corner', and was kept supplied by the affectionate boy.

nosegay - regalo; ramillete

"Miss Meg March, one letter and a glove," continued Beth, delivering the articles to her sister, who sat near her mother, stitching wristbands.

stitching - Puntadas; (stitch) Puntadas

wristbands - pulseras; munequera, correa

"Why, I left a pair over there, and here is only one," said Meg, looking at the gray cotton glove. "Didn't you drop the other in the garden?"

"No, I'm sure I didn't, for there was only one in the office."

"I hate to have odd gloves! Never mind, the other may be found. My letter is only a translation of the German song I wanted. I think Mr. Brooke did it, for this isn't Laurie's writing."

Mrs.

March glanced at Meg, who was looking very pretty in her gingham morning gown, with the little curls blowing about her forehead, and very womanly, as she sat sewing at her little worktable, full of tidy white rolls, so unconscious of the thought in her mother's mind as she sewed and sang, while her fingers flew and her thoughts were busied with girlish fancies as innocent and fresh as the pansies in her belt, that Mrs. March smiled and was satisfied.

gingham - guinga

little curls - pequenos rizos

womanly - femenino, mujeril, femenil, femíneo

worktable - mesa de trabajo

unconscious - inconsciente, subconsciente, subconsciencia

"Two letters for Doctor Jo, a book, and a funny old hat, which covered the whole post office and stuck outside," said Beth, laughing as she went into the study where Jo sat writing.

"What a sly fellow Laurie is! I said I wished bigger hats were the fashion, because I burn my face every hot day. He said, ˜Why mind the fashion? Wear a big hat, and be comfortable!'I said I would if I had one, and he has sent me this, to try me. I'll wear it for fun, and show him I don't care for the fashion." And hanging the antique broad-brim on a bust of Plato, Jo read her letters.

broad - amplio; ancho

brim - borde

bust - reventar; busto, pecho

Plato - Platón

One from her mother made her cheeks glow and her eyes fill, for it said to her...

My Dear:

I write a little word to tell you with how much satisfaction I watch your efforts to control your temper. You say nothing about your trials, failures, or successes, and think, perhaps, that no one sees them but the Friend whose help you daily ask, if I may trust the well-worn cover of your guidebook.

trials - pruebas; proceso, juicio

I, too, have seen them all, and heartily believe in the sincerity of your resolution, since it begins to bear fruit. Go on, dear, patiently and bravely, and always believe that no one sympathizes more tenderly with you than your loving...

sincerity - sinceridad

bear fruit - dar frutos

sympathizes - simpatizar

Mother

"That does me good! That's worth millions of money and pecks of praise. Oh, Marmee, I do try! I will keep on trying, and not get tired, since I have you to help me."

pecks - picos; picotear

Laying her head on her arms, Jo wet her little romance with a few happy tears, for she had thought that no one saw and appreciated her efforts to be good, and this assurance was doubly precious, doubly encouraging, because unexpected and from the person whose commendation she most valued. Feeling stronger than ever to meet and subdue her Apollyon, she pinned the note inside her frock, as a shield and a reminder, lest she be taken unaware, and proceeded to open her other letter, quite ready for either good or bad news. In a big, dashing hand, Laurie wrote..

assurance - seguridad; certidumbre, confianza

doubly - doblemente

commendation - comendación, encomio, recomendación

shield - escudo

reminder - aviso, recordatorio

unaware - inconsciente, desprevenido, ignorante

dashing - legante; raya, guion largo, carrerita, gota, pizca, lanzarse

Dear Jo, What ho!

Some English girls and boys are coming to see me tomorrow and I want to have a jolly time. If it's fine, I'm going to pitch my tent in Longmeadow, and row up the whole crew to lunch and croquet"have a fire, make messes, gypsy fashion, and all sorts of larks. They are nice people, and like such things.

pitch - plantar, armar, montar

crew - tripulación

gypsy - gitano, gitana

Brooke will go to keep us boys steady, and Kate Vaughn will play propriety for the girls. I want you all to come, can't let Beth off at any price, and nobody shall worry her. Don't bother about rations, I'll see to that and everything else, only do come, there's a good fellow!

steady - estable; firme, liso, fijo

Don't bother - No te molestes

rations - raciones; ración, racionar

In a tearing hurry, Yours ever, Laurie.

"Here's richness!" cried Jo, flying in to tell the news to Meg.

"Of course we can go, Mother? It will be such a help to Laurie, for I can row, and Meg see to the lunch, and the children be useful in some way."

"I hope the Vaughns are not fine grown-up people. Do you know anything about them, Jo?" asked Meg.

"Only that there are four of them. Kate is older than you, Fred and Frank (twins) about my age, and a little girl (Grace), who is nine or ten. Laurie knew them abroad, and liked the boys. I fancied, from the way he primmed up his mouth in speaking of her, that he didn't admire Kate much."

primmed - preparado; formal, remilgado

"I'm so glad my French print is clean, it's just the thing and so becoming!" observed Meg complacently. "Have you anything decent, Jo?"

"Scarlet and gray boating suit, good enough for me. I shall row and tramp about, so I don't want any starch to think of. You'll come, Betty?"

tramp - vagabundo, vagabunda, golfa, ramera, puta

starch - almidón, almidonar

"If you won't let any boys talk to me."

"Not a boy!"

"I like to please Laurie, and I'm not afraid of Mr. Brooke, he is so kind. But I don't want to play, or sing, or say anything. I'll work hard and not trouble anyone, and you'll take care of me, Jo, so I'll go."

"That's my good girl. You do try to fight off your shyness, and I love you for it. Fighting faults isn't easy, as I know, and a cheery word kind of gives a lift. Thank you, Mother," And Jo gave the thin cheek a grateful kiss, more precious to Mrs. March than if it had given back the rosy roundness of her youth.

shyness - timidez

more precious - más precioso

given back - devolver algo (a alguien)

roundness - redondez

"I had a box of chocolate drops, and the picture I wanted to copy," said Amy, showing her mail.

"And I got a note from Mr. Laurence, asking me to come over and play to him tonight, before the lamps are lighted, and I shall go," added Beth, whose friendship with the old gentleman prospered finely.

prospered - rosperó; prosperar

"Now let's fly round, and do double duty today, so that we can play tomorrow with free minds," said Jo, preparing to replace her pen with a broom.

fly round - recorrer volando, dar la vuelta

When the sun peeped into the girls'room early next morning to promise them a fine day, he saw a comical sight. Each had made such preparation for the fete as seemed necessary and proper.

preparation - preparación

Meg had an extra row of little curlpapers across her forehead, Jo had copiously anointed her afflicted face with cold cream, Beth had taken Joanna to bed with her to atone for the approaching separation, and Amy had capped the climax by putting a clothespin on her nose to uplift the offending feature. It was one of the kind artists use to hold the paper on their drawing boards, therefore quite appropriate and effective for the purpose it was now being put. This funny spectacle appeared to amuse the sun, for he burst out with such radiance that Jo woke up and roused her sisters by a hearty laugh at Amy's ornament.

anointed - ungido; ungir

atone - expiar

separation - separación

climax - clímax, colofón, orgasmo

clothespin - Pinza

Uplift - elevación; elevar, alzar, trascender, exaltar, levantamiento

offending - ofender

radiance - resplandor, brillo, fulgor

Sunshine and laughter were good omens for a pleasure party, and soon a lively bustle began in both houses. Beth, who was ready first, kept reporting what went on next door, and enlivened her sisters'toilets by frequent telegrams from the window.

omens - presagios; presagio

enlivened - animado; avivar, amenizar

"There goes the man with the tent! I see Mrs. Barker doing up the lunch in a hamper and a great basket. Now Mr. Laurence is looking up at the sky and the weathercock. I wish he would go too. There's Laurie, looking like a sailor, nice boy! Oh, mercy me! Here's a carriage full of people, a tall lady, a little girl, and two dreadful boys.

hamper - cesta; estorbar, impedir, obstaculizar

weathercock - veleta

One is lame, poor thing, he's got a crutch. Laurie didn't tell us that. Be quick, girls! It's getting late. Why, there is Ned Moffat, I do declare. Meg, isn't that the man who bowed to you one day when we were shopping?"

crutch - muleta, apoyo, soporte

"So it is. How queer that he should come. I thought he was at the mountains. There is Sallie. I'm glad she got back in time. Am I all right, Jo?" cried Meg in a flutter.

"A regular daisy. Hold up your dress and put your hat on straight, it looks sentimental tipped that way and will fly off at the first puff. Now then, come on!"

puff - soplar; soplo, racha, ráfaga; bocanada

"Oh, Jo, you are not going to wear that awful hat? It's too absurd! You shall not make a guy of yourself," remonstrated Meg, as Jo tied down with a red ribbon the broad-brimmed, old-fashioned leghorn Laurie had sent for a joke.

remonstrated - remonstrated; quejarse

brimmed - de ala; borde

"I just will, though, for it's capital, so shady, light, and big. It will make fun, and I don't mind being a guy if I'm comfortable." With that Jo marched straight away and the rest followed, a bright little band of sisters, all looking their best in summer suits, with happy faces under the jaunty hatbrims.

shady - sombra; umbroso, umbrío, turbio, sórdido

jaunty - alegre, animado, desenvuelto

hatbrims - Sombreros

Laurie ran to meet and present them to his friends in the most cordial manner. The lawn was the reception room, and for several minutes a lively scene was enacted there. Meg was grateful to see that Miss Kate, though twenty, was dressed with a simplicity which American girls would do well to imitate, and who was much flattered by Mr. Ned's assurances that he came especially to see her.

most cordial - el más cordial

reception room - sala de recepción

simplicity - simplicidad, sencillez, llano

assurances - garantías; certidumbre, confianza

Jo understood why Laurie ˜primmed up his mouth'when speaking of Kate, for that young lady had a standoff-don't-touch-me air, which contrasted strongly with the free and easy demeanor of the other girls. Beth took an observation of the new boys and decided that the lame one was not ˜dreadful', but gentle and feeble, and she would be kind to him on that account. Amy found Grace a well-mannered, merry, little person, and after staring dumbly at one another for a few minutes, they suddenly became very good friends.

mannered - Amanerado

dumbly - Tontamente

Tents, lunch, and croquet utensils having been sent on beforehand, the party was soon embarked, and the two boats pushed off together, leaving Mr. Laurence waving his hat on the shore. Laurie and Jo rowed one boat, Mr. Brooke and Ned the other, while Fred Vaughn, the riotous twin, did his best to upset both by paddling about in a wherry like a disturbed water bug. Jo's funny hat deserved a vote of thanks, for it was of general utility.

utensils - utensilios; utensilio

sent on - enviado

beforehand - de antemano, anticipadamente, adelantadamente, antes

embarked - embarcado; embarcar, embarcarse

pushed off - empujado, rechazado

rowed - remo; hilera, fila

riotous - Disturbios

paddling - Remando; (paddle) Remando

wherry - werry; chalana

bug - chinche, bicho, error, fallo, defecto, bug, manía

utility - utilidad, conveniencia, proveedor de servicios

It broke the ice in the beginning by producing a laugh, it created quite a refreshing breeze, flapping to and fro as she rowed, and would make an excellent umbrella for the whole party, if a shower came up, she said. Miss Kate decided that she was ˜odd', but rather clever, and smiled upon her from afar.

breeze - brisa

flapping - leteo; solapa; faldón

Meg, in the other boat, was delightfully situated, face to face with the rowers, who both admired the prospect and feathered their oars with uncommon ˜skill and dexterity'. Mr. Brooke was a grave, silent young man, with handsome brown eyes and a pleasant voice. Meg liked his quiet manners and considered him a walking encyclopedia of useful knowledge. He never talked to her much, but he looked at her a good deal, and she felt sure that he did not regard her with aversion. Ned, being in college, of course put on all the airs which freshmen think it their bounden duty to assume.

situated - situado; situar

rowers - remeros; remero, remador, boga, bogador

feathered - plumas; pluma

oars - remos; remo

uncommon - incomún; raro, poco común, extrano, poco frecuente

dexterity - destreza

encyclopedia - enciclopedia

aversion - aversión

freshmen - de primer ano; novato, mechón, cachimbo

He was not very wise, but very good-natured, and altogether an excellent person to carry on a picnic. Sallie Gardiner was absorbed in keeping her white pique dress clean and chattering with the ubiquitous Fred, who kept Beth in constant terror by his pranks.

picnic - jira, pícnic

pique - resentimiento, despecho

chattering - Charlando; (chatter) Charlando

ubiquitous - mnipresente; ubicuo, común

pranks - bromas; travesura, broma, inocentada, jugarreta

It was not far to Longmeadow, but the tent was pitched and the wickets down by the time they arrived. A pleasant green field, with three wide-spreading oaks in the middle and a smooth strip of turf for croquet.

pitched - pitched; plantar, armar, montar

wickets - wickets; ventanilla

oaks - robles; roble, encina, carrasca

strip - tira; quitar, desprender; arrancar; despojar

turf - césped, terreno, territorio, tepe, gallón, turba, hipódromo

"Welcome to Camp Laurence!" said the young host, as they landed with exclamations of delight.

exclamations - exclamaciones; exclamación

"Brooke is commander in chief, I am commissary general, the other fellows are staff officers, and you, ladies, are company. The tent is for your especial benefit and that oak is your drawing room, this is the messroom and the third is the camp kitchen. Now, let's have a game before it gets hot, and then we'll see about dinner."

commander - comandante

commissary - Comisario

oak - roble, encina, carrasca

messroom - Comedor

Frank, Beth, Amy, and Grace sat down to watch the game played by the other eight. Mr. Brooke chose Meg, Kate, and Fred. Laurie took Sallie, Jo, and Ned. The English played well, but the Americans played better, and contested every inch of the ground as strongly as if the spirit of '76 inspired them. Jo and Fred had several skirmishes and once narrowly escaped high words.

contested - impugnada; debate, concurso, competencia, competición, competir

inch - pulgada

inspired - inspirado; inspirar, infundir

Jo was through the last wicket and had missed the stroke, which failure ruffled her a good deal. Fred was close behind her and his turn came before hers. He gave a stroke, his ball hit the wicket, and stopped an inch on the wrong side. No one was very near, and running up to examine, he gave it a sly nudge with his toe, which put it just an inch on the right side.

stroke - ictus; golpe

failure - fallo, fracaso, fiasco, fracasado, avería

"I'm through! Now, Miss Jo, I'll settle you, and get in first," cried the young gentleman, swinging his mallet for another blow.

swinging - Balanceándose; (swing); balancear, mecer, columpiar, oscilar

mallet - mazo

"You pushed it. I saw you. It's my turn now," said Jo sharply.

It's my turn - Es mi turno

"Upon my word, I didn't move it. It rolled a bit, perhaps, but that is allowed. So, stand off please, and let me have a go at the stake."

stake - estaca, participación, estacar, poner en juego

"We don't cheat in America, but you can, if you choose," said Jo angrily.

"Yankees are a deal the most tricky, everybody knows. There you go!" returned Fred, croqueting her ball far away.

Yankees - yankees; yanqui, gabacho

most tricky - el más complicado, el más tramposo

Jo opened her lips to say something rude, but checked herself in time, colored up to her forehead and stood a minute, hammering down a wicket with all her might, while Fred hit the stake and declared himself out with much exultation. She went off to get her ball, and was a long time finding it among the bushes, but she came back, looking cool and quiet, and waited her turn patiently.

exultation - exultación

bushes - arbustos; arbusto

It took several strokes to regain the place she had lost, and when she got there, the other side had nearly won, for Kate's ball was the last but one and lay near the stake.

strokes - golpes; golpe

regain - recuperar; recobrar

last but one - penúltimo

"By George, it's all up with us! Goodbye, Kate. Miss Jo owes me one, so you are finished," cried Fred excitedly, as they all drew near to see the finish.

owes - deber, adeudar, estar en deuda

"Yankees have a trick of being generous to their enemies," said Jo, with a look that made the lad redden, "especially when they beat them," she added, as, leaving Kate's ball untouched, she won the game by a clever stroke.

redden - enrojecer

Laurie threw up his hat, then remembered that it wouldn't do to exult over the defeat of his guests, and stopped in the middle of the cheer to whisper to his friend, "Good for you, Jo! He did cheat, I saw him. We can't tell him so, but he won't do it again, take my word for it."

exult - exultar

cheer - animar; viva, hurra

whisper to - susurrar a

Meg drew her aside, under pretense of pinning up a loose braid, and said approvingly, "It was dreadfully provoking, but you kept your temper, and I'm so glad, Jo."

loose - suelto; flojo

braid - trenzar

provoking - provocando; provocar

"Don't praise me, Meg, for I could box his ears this minute. I should certainly have boiled over if I hadn't stayed among the nettles till I got my rage under control enough to hold my tongue. It's simmering now, so I hope he'll keep out of my way," returned Jo, biting her lips as she glowered at Fred from under her big hat.

this minute - en este momento

boiled over - desbordar

nettles - ortigas; ortiga, picar, checkirritar, checkprovocar

rage - furia; rabia, furor

"Time for lunch," said Mr. Brooke, looking at his watch. "Commissary general, will you make the fire and get water, while Miss March, Miss Sallie, and I spread the table? Who can make good coffee?"

"Jo can," said Meg, glad to recommend her sister. So Jo, feeling that her late lessons in cookery were to do her honor, went to preside over the coffeepot, while the children collected dry sticks, and the boys made a fire and got water from a spring near by. Miss Kate sketched and Frank talked to Beth, who was making little mats of braided rushes to serve as plates.

cookery - Cocina

coffeepot - Cafetera

sketched - esbozado; bosquejar, esbozar, pergenar, esbozo, bosquejo

mats - esteras; estera, felpudo

braided - trenzado; trenzar

The commander in chief and his aides soon spread the tablecloth with an inviting array of eatables and drinkables, prettily decorated with green leaves. Jo announced that the coffee was ready, and everyone settled themselves to a hearty meal, for youth is seldom dyspeptic, and exercise develops wholesome appetites. A very merry lunch it was, for everything seemed fresh and funny, and frequent peals of laughter startled a venerable horse who fed near by. There was a pleasing inequality in the table, which produced many mishaps to cups and plates, acorns dropped in the milk, little black ants partook of the refreshments without being invited, and fuzzy caterpillars swung down from the tree to see what was going on.

aides - Ayudantes; (aid) Ayudantes

tablecloth - mantel

eatables - comestible

drinkables - bebibles; potable, bebedizo, bebible, bebestible

appetites - apetito, deseo, ganas

peals - eals; repique, toque de campanas

venerable - venerable

inequality - desigualdad, inecuación

acorns - ellotas; bellota

Ants - hormigas; hormiga

partook - participó; participar

refreshments - refrescos; refrescamiento, refrigerio

fuzzy - impreciso

caterpillars - orugas; oruga, cuncuna, tractor de oruga

swung - se balanceó; balancear, mecer, columpiar, oscilar, columpio

Three white-headed children peeped over the fence, and an objectionable dog barked at them from the other side of the river with all his might and main.

barked at - Ladrado

"There's salt here," said Laurie, as he handed Jo a saucer of berries.

saucer - plato; platillo

"Thank you, I prefer spiders," she replied, fishing up two unwary little ones who had gone to a creamy death. "How dare you remind me of that horrid dinner party, when yours is so nice in every way?" added Jo, as they both laughed and ate out of one plate, the china having run short.

fishing up - Pescar

unwary - incautos; incauto

creamy - cremoso, crema

run short - acabarse, quedarse sin

"I had an uncommonly good time that day, and haven't got over it yet. This is no credit to me, you know, I don't do anything. It's you and Meg and Brooke who make it all go, and I'm no end obliged to you. What shall we do when we can't eat anymore?" asked Laurie, feeling that his trump card had been played when lunch was over.

"Have games till it's cooler. I brought Authors, and I dare say Miss Kate knows something new and nice. Go and ask her. She's company, and you ought to stay with her more."

"Aren't you company too? I thought she'd suit Brooke, but he keeps talking to Meg, and Kate just stares at them through that ridiculous glass of hers. I'm going, so you needn't try to preach propriety, for you can't do it, Jo."

preach - predicar

Miss Kate did know several new games, and as the girls would not, and the boys could not, eat any more, they all adjourned to the drawing room to play Rig-marole.

adjourned - se levanta la sesión; suspender, posponer, diferir, aplazar

"One person begins a story, any nonsense you like, and tells as long as he pleases, only taking care to stop short at some exciting point, when the next takes it up and does the same. It's very funny when well done, and makes a perfect jumble of tragical comical stuff to laugh over. Please start it, Mr. Brooke," said Kate, with a commanding air, which surprised Meg, who treated the tutor with as much respect as any other gentleman.

stop short - parar en seco

jumble - evoltijo; desordenar

tragical - Trágico

Lying on the grass at the feet of the two young ladies, Mr. Brooke obediently began the story, with the handsome brown eyes steadily fixed upon the sunshiny river.

steadily - De forma constante

"Once on a time, a knight went out into the world to seek his fortune, for he had nothing but his sword and his shield. He traveled a long while, nearly eight-and-twenty years, and had a hard time of it, till he came to the palace of a good old king, who had offered a reward to anyone who could tame and train a fine but unbroken colt, of which he was very fond. The knight agreed to try, and got on slowly but surely, for the colt was a gallant fellow, and soon learned to love his new master, though he was freakish and wild. Every day, when he gave his lessons to this pet of the king's, the knight rode him through the city, and as he rode, he looked everywhere for a certain beautiful face, which he had seen many times in his dreams, but never found. One day, as he went prancing down a quiet street, he saw at the window of a ruinous castle the lovely face. He was delighted, inquired who lived in this old castle, and was told that several captive princesses were kept there by a spell, and spun all day to lay up money to buy their liberty.

Knight - caballero

seek - buscar

tame - dócil; domesticado; doméstico

prancing - Presumiendo; (prance); encabritarse

ruinous - ruinoso

captive - cautivo, prisionero, preso

spun - hilado; hacer girar

liberty - libertad

The knight wished intensely that he could free them, but he was poor and could only go by each day, watching for the sweet face and longing to see it out in the sunshine. At last he resolved to get into the castle and ask how he could help them. He went and knocked. The great door flew open, and he beheld..."

intensely - intensamente

beheld - ontemplado; contemplar, mirar, observar, he aquí, mirad

"A ravishingly lovely lady, who exclaimed, with a cry of rapture, ˜At last! At last!'" continued Kate, who had read French novels, and admired the style. "'Tis she!'cried Count Gustave, and fell at her feet in an ecstasy of joy. ˜Oh, rise!'she said, extending a hand of marble fairness. ˜Never! Till you tell me how I may rescue you,'swore the knight, still kneeling.

ravishingly - eslumbrantemente

ecstasy - éxtasis

extending - extendiéndose; extender, ampliar

fairness - imparcialidad, equidad

swore - lo juraste; jurar

˜Alas, my cruel fate condemns me to remain here till my tyrant is destroyed.'˜Where is the villain?'˜In the mauve salon. Go, brave heart, and save me from despair.'˜I obey, and return victorious or dead!'With these thrilling words he rushed away, and flinging open the door of the mauve salon, was about to enter, when he received..."

condemns - condenar, clausurar

tyrant - tirano

mauve - malva

salon - salón, sala

brave heart - un corazón valiente

obey - obedecer

victorious - victorioso

flinging - lanzamiento; arrojar, lanzar

"A stunning blow from the big Greek lexicon, which an old fellow in a black gown fired at him," said Ned. "Instantly, Sir What's-his-name recovered himself, pitched the tyrant out of the window, and turned to join the lady, victorious, but with a bump on his brow, found the door locked, tore up the curtains, made a rope ladder, got halfway down when the ladder broke, and he went headfirst into the moat, sixty feet below. Could swim like a duck, paddled round the castle till he came to a little door guarded by two stout fellows, knocked their heads together till they cracked like a couple of nuts, then, by a trifling exertion of his prodigious strength, he smashed in the door, went up a pair of stone steps covered with dust a foot thick, toads as big as your fist, and spiders that would frighten you into hysterics, Miss March.

stunning - impresionante; anonadar, aturdir, pasmar, atontar

lexicon - léxico

recovered - recuperado; recuperarse

bump - chichón, tolondro, cototo, checkbache

tore up - romper en pedazos; llenarse los ojos de lágrimas

ladder - escalera, escalafón, carrera

headfirst - De cabeza

moat - fosa, foso

Duck - pato; hundir, sumergir

paddled - emado; chapotear, mojarse los pies

cracked - roto; rajarse, resquebrajarse

trifling - tan insignificante; trivial, de pitiminí

exertion - esfuerzo

At the top of these steps he came plump upon a sight that took his breath away and chilled his blood..."

chilled - frío

"A tall figure, all in white with a veil over its face and a lamp in its wasted hand," went on Meg. "It beckoned, gliding noiselessly before him down a corridor as dark and cold as any tomb. Shadowy effigies in armor stood on either side, a dead silence reigned, the lamp burned blue, and the ghostly figure ever and anon turned its face toward him, showing the glitter of awful eyes through its white veil.

corridor - pasillo, corredor

tomb - tumba

effigies - efigies; efigie

reigned - reinado, reinar

ghostly - fantasmal

They reached a curtained door, behind which sounded lovely music. He sprang forward to enter, but the specter plucked him back, and waved threateningly before him a..."

specter - espectro, imagen

plucked - desplumado; herir, desplumar, perseverancia

threateningly - amenazadoramente

"Snuffbox," said Jo, in a sepulchral tone, which convulsed the audience. "˜Thankee,'said the knight politely, as he took a pinch and sneezed seven times so violently that his head fell off. ˜Ha! Ha!'laughed the ghost, and having peeped through the keyhole at the princesses spinning away for dear life, the evil spirit picked up her victim and put him in a large tin box, where there were eleven other knights packed together without their heads, like sardines, who all rose and began to.

snuffbox - tabaquera

sepulchral - sepulcral

Thankee - Gracias

politely - educadamente, cortésmente

sneezed - estornudó; estornudar, estornudo

violently - violentamente

keyhole - el ojo de la cerradura; ojo

spinning - girando; hilatura; (spin) girando; hilatura

sardines - sardinas; sardina

."

"Dance a hornpipe," cut in Fred, as Jo paused for breath, "and, as they danced, the rubbishy old castle turned to a man-of-war in full sail. ˜Up with the jib, reef the tops'l halliards, helm hard alee, and man the guns!'roared the captain, as a Portuguese pirate hove in sight, with a flag black as ink flying from her foremast.

hornpipe - chirimía

jib - foque

reef - arrecife

helm - yelmo; timón

roared - rugía; rugir, bramar, rugido, bramido

Portuguese - portugués, portugués, portuguesa

pirate - pirata, bucanero, barco pirata, piratear

foremast - el trinquete; palo de trinquete

˜Go in and win, my hearties!'says the captain, and a tremendous fight began. Of course the British beat"they always do."

hearties - corazones; carinoso, de corazón, cordial, corpulento, nutritivo

"No, they don't!" cried Jo, aside.

"Having taken the pirate captain prisoner, sailed slap over the schooner, whose decks were piled high with dead and whose lee scuppers ran blood, for the order had been ˜Cutlasses, and die hard!'˜Bosun's mate, take a bight of the flying-jib sheet, and start this villain if he doesn't confess his sins double quick,'said the British captain.

slap - abofetada; bofetada, cachetada, abofetear, cachetear, golpear

schooner - goleta, escuna

decks - mazos; cubierta

Lee - abrigo, sotavento, socaire

scuppers - Imposible

cutlasses - cuchillos; sable

mate - colega; aparear, acoplar

bight - curva, corva, ensenada, lazo

double quick - rapidísimo, volando

The Portuguese held his tongue like a brick, and walked the plank, while the jolly tars cheered like mad. But the sly dog dived, came up under the man-of-war, scuttled her, and down she went, with all sail set, ˜To the bottom of the sea, sea, sea'where..."

brick - ladrillo

plank - placa; tablón, artículo, entablar

tars - alquitranes; alquitrán, brea, chapapote

sly dog - perro astuto

dived - buceó; zambullirse, tirarse de cabeza

scuttled - undido; echar a correr

"Oh, gracious! What shall I say?" cried Sallie, as Fred ended his rigmarole, in which he had jumbled together pell-mell nautical phrases and facts out of one of his favorite books. "Well, they went to the bottom, and a nice mermaid welcomed them, but was much grieved on finding the box of headless knights, and kindly pickled them in brine, hoping to discover the mystery about them, for being a woman, she was curious.

rigmarole - un galimatías; embrollo

jumbled - evuelto; desordenar

nautical - náutica; náutico

mermaid - sirena

brine - salmuera, agua de mar, poner en salmuera, salar

Curious - tienes curiosidad; curioso; extrano, raro

By-and-by a diver came down, and the mermaid said, ˜I'll give you a box of pearls if you can take it up,'for she wanted to restore the poor things to life, and couldn't raise the heavy load herself. So the diver hoisted it up, and was much disappointed on opening it to find no pearls. He left it in a great lonely field, where it was found by a..."

diver - buceador; saltador, saltadora, piscinero

pearls - perlas; perla, parisienne

hoisted - izadas; izar, aparejo

"Little goose girl, who kept a hundred fat geese in the field," said Amy, when Sallie's invention gave out. "The little girl was sorry for them, and asked an old woman what she should do to help them. ˜Your geese will tell you, they know everything.'said the old woman. So she asked what she should use for new heads, since the old ones were lost, and all the geese opened their hundred mouths and screamed..."

geese - Gansos

Cabbages!'" continued Laurie promptly. "˜Just the thing,'said the girl, and ran to get twelve fine ones from her garden. She put them on, the knights revived at once, thanked her, and went on their way rejoicing, never knowing the difference, for there were so many other heads like them in the world that no one thought anything of it. The knight in whom I'm interested went back to find the pretty face, and learned that the princesses had spun themselves free and all gone and married, but one. He was in a great state of mind at that, and mounting the colt, who stood by him through thick and thin, rushed to the castle to see which was left. Peeping over the hedge, he saw the queen of his affections picking flowers in her garden.

cabbages - coles; repollo

mounting - Montaje; (mount) Montaje

affections - fectos; afecto, carino, apego

˜Will you give me a rose?'said he. ˜You must come and get it. I can't come to you, it isn't proper,'said she, as sweet as honey. He tried to climb over the hedge, but it seemed to grow higher and higher. Then he tried to push through, but it grew thicker and thicker, and he was in despair. So he patiently broke twig after twig till he had made a little hole through which he peeped, saying imploringly, ˜Let me in! Let me in!'But the pretty princess did not seem to understand, for she picked her roses quietly, and left him to fight his way in. Whether he did or not, Frank will tell you."

twig - rama; ramita

"I can't. I'm not playing, I never do," said Frank, dismayed at the sentimental predicament out of which he was to rescue the absurd couple. Beth had disappeared behind Jo, and Grace was asleep.

dismayed - consternado; espanto, estupefacción, consternación

predicament - problemas; predicamento, aprieto, apuro

"So the poor knight is to be left sticking in the hedge, is he?" asked Mr. Brooke, still watching the river, and playing with the wild rose in his buttonhole.

buttonhole - ojal, cazar al espartillo

"I guess the princess gave him a posy, and opened the gate after a while," said Laurie, smiling to himself, as he threw acorns at his tutor.

"What a piece of nonsense we have made! With practice we might do something quite clever. Do you know Truth?"

"I hope so," said Meg soberly.

"The game, I mean?"

"What is it?" said Fred.

"Why, you pile up your hands, choose a number, and draw out in turn, and the person who draws at the number has to answer truly any question put by the rest. It's great fun."

"Let's try it," said Jo, who liked new experiments.

Miss Kate and Mr. Brooke, Meg, and Ned declined, but Fred, Sallie, Jo, and Laurie piled and drew, and the lot fell to Laurie.

"Who are your heroes?" asked Jo.

"Grandfather and Napoleon."

Napoleon - Napoleón

"Which lady here do you think prettiest?" said Sallie.

"Margaret."

"Which do you like best?" from Fred.

"Jo, of course."

"What silly questions you ask!" And Jo gave a disdainful shrug as the rest laughed at Laurie's matter-of-fact tone.

disdainful - despectivo; desdenoso, displicente

"Try again. Truth isn't a bad game," said Fred.

"It's a very good one for you," retorted Jo in a low voice. Her turn came next.

"What is your greatest fault?" asked Fred, by way of testing in her the virtue he lacked himself.

"A quick temper."

"What do you most wish for?" said Laurie.

"A pair of boot lacings," returned Jo, guessing and defeating his purpose.

defeating - derrotando; vencer, derrotar

"Not a true answer. You must say what you really do want most."

"Genius. Don't you wish you could give it to me, Laurie?" And she slyly smiled in his disappointed face.

slyly - a hurtadillas; astutamente, arteramente

"What virtues do you most admire in a man?" asked Sallie.

"Courage and honesty."

honesty - honradez, sinceridad, honestidad, monedas del Papa

"Now my turn," said Fred, as his hand came last.

"Let's give it to him," whispered Laurie to Jo, who nodded and asked at once...

"Didn't you cheat at croquet?"

"Well, yes, a little bit."

"Good! Didn't you take your story out of The sea lion?" said Laurie.

sea lion - león marino

"Rather."

"Don't you think the English nation perfect in every respect?" asked Sallie.

"I should be ashamed of myself if I didn't."

"He's a true John Bull. Now, Miss Sallie, you shall have a chance without waiting to draw. I'll harrrow up your feelings first by asking if you don't think you are something of a flirt," said Laurie, as Jo nodded to Fred as a sign that peace was declared.

Bull - toro

harrrow - grada

"You impertinent boy! Of course I'm not," exclaimed Sallie, with an air that proved the contrary.

"What do you hate most?" asked Fred.

"Spiders and rice pudding."

rice pudding - arroz con leche

"What do you like best?" asked Jo.

"Dancing and French gloves."

"Well, I think Truth is a very silly play. Let's have a sensible game of Authors to refresh our minds," proposed Jo.

refresh - refrescar

Ned, Frank, and the little girls joined in this, and while it went on, the three elders sat apart, talking. Miss Kate took out her sketch again, and Margaret watched her, while Mr. Brooke lay on the grass with a book, which he did not read.

elders - ancianos; mayor

"How beautifully you do it! I wish I could draw," said Meg, with mingled admiration and regret in her voice.

"Why don't you learn? I should think you had taste and talent for it," replied Miss Kate graciously.

"I haven't time."

"Your mamma prefers other accomplishments, I fancy. So did mine, but I proved to her that I had talent by taking a few lessons privately, and then she was quite willing I should go on. Can't you do the same with your governess?"

"I have none."

"I forgot young ladies in America go to school more than with us. Very fine schools they are, too, Papa says. You go to a private one, I suppose?"

"I don't go at all. I am a governess myself."

"Oh, indeed!" said Miss Kate, but she might as well have said, "Dear me, how dreadful!" for her tone implied it, and something in her face made Meg color, and wish she had not been so frank.

implied - implícito; implicar, acarrear, conllevar, insinuar

Mr. Brooke looked up and said quickly, "Young ladies in America love independence as much as their ancestors did, and are admired and respected for supporting themselves."

ancestors - ancestros; ancestro, antepasado

"Oh, yes, of course it's very nice and proper in them to do so. We have many most respectable and worthy young women who do the same and are employed by the nobility, because, being the daughters of gentlemen, they are both well bred and accomplished, you know," said Miss Kate in a patronizing tone that hurt Meg's pride, and made her work seem not only more distasteful, but degrading.

most respectable - ás respetable

nobility - nobleza

patronizing - condescendiente; patrocinar, frecuentar

distasteful - de mal gusto, desagradable, chocante, ofensivo

degrading - degradante; degradar, erosionar

"Did the German song suit, Miss March?" inquired Mr. Brooke, breaking an awkward pause.

"Oh, yes! It was very sweet, and I'm much obliged to whoever translated it for me." And Meg's downcast face brightened as she spoke.

Whoever - a quién; cualquier, cualesquiera, cualquiera, quien

"Don't you read German?" asked Miss Kate with a look of surprise.

"Not very well. My father, who taught me, is away, and I don't get on very fast alone, for I've no one to correct my pronunciation."

pronunciation - pronunciación

"Try a little now. Here is Schiller's Mary Stuart and a tutor who loves to teach." And Mr. Brooke laid his book on her lap with an inviting smile.

"It's so hard I'm afraid to try," said Meg, grateful, but bashful in the presence of the accomplished young lady beside her.

"I'll read a bit to encourage you." And Miss Kate read one of the most beautiful passages in a perfectly correct but perfectly expressionless manner.

passages - pasajes; pasillo, pasadizo

expressionless - sin expresión; inexpresivo

Mr. Brooke made no comment as she returned the book to Meg, who said innocently, "I thought it was poetry."

innocently - inocentemente

"Some of it is. Try this passage."

passage - pasaje; pasillo, pasadizo

There was a queer smile about Mr. Brooke's mouth as he opened at poor Mary's lament.

lament - lamento, lamentación, lamentar

Meg obediently following the long grass-blade which her new tutor used to point with, read slowly and timidly, unconsciously making poetry of the hard words by the soft intonation of her musical voice. Down the page went the green guide, and presently, forgetting her listener in the beauty of the sad scene, Meg read as if alone, giving a little touch of tragedy to the words of the unhappy queen.

blade - cuchilla, hoja, cuchillo (said of a dagger), espada, pala, aspa

intonation - entonación

If she had seen the brown eyes then, she would have stopped short, but she never looked up, and the lesson was not spoiled for her.

"Very well indeed!" said Mr. Brooke, as she paused, quite ignoring her many mistakes, and looking as if he did indeed love to teach.

Miss Kate put up her glass, and, having taken a survey of the little tableau before her, shut her sketch book, saying with condescension, "You've a nice accent and in time will be a clever reader. I advise you to learn, for German is a valuable accomplishment to teachers.

tableau - cuadro, retablo, cuadro vivo

accent - acento, pronunciación

I must look after Grace, she is romping." And Miss Kate strolled away, adding to herself with a shrug, "I didn't come to chaperone a governess, though she is young and pretty. What odd people these Yankees are. I'm afraid Laurie will be quite spoiled among them."

strolled - paseando; paseo, caminata, garbeo, vuelta, pasearse

chaperone - chaperona; duena, carabina, chaperón, panish: t-needed

"I forgot that English people rather turn up their noses at governesses and don't treat them as we do," said Meg, looking after the retreating figure with an annoyed expression.

governesses - gobernantas; institutriz

retreating - retirarse, batirse en retirada

"Tutors also have rather a hard time of it there, as I know to my sorrow. There's no place like America for us workers, Miss Margaret." And Mr. Brooke looked so contented and cheerful that Meg was ashamed to lament her hard lot.

tutors - tutores; tutor

my sorrow - mi tristeza; mi desgracia

"I'm glad I live in it then. I don't like my work, but I get a good deal of satisfaction out of it after all, so I won't complain. I only wished I liked teaching as you do."

"I think you would if you had Laurie for a pupil. I shall be very sorry to lose him next year," said Mr. Brooke, busily punching holes in the turf.

pupil - alumno

punching - punetazos; ponche

"Going to college, I suppose?" Meg's lips asked the question, but her eyes added, "And what becomes of you?"

"Yes, It's high time he went, for he is ready, and as soon as he is off, I shall turn soldier. I am needed."

It's high time - Ya es hora

"I am glad of that!" exclaimed Meg. "I should think every young man would want to go, though it is hard for the mothers and sisters who stay at home," she added sorrowfully.

sorrowfully - con tristeza

"I have neither, and very few friends to care whether I live or die," said Mr. Brooke rather bitterly as he absently put the dead rose in the hole he had made and covered it up, like a little grave.

absently - istraídamente; Ausentemente

"Laurie and his grandfather would care a great deal, and we should all be very sorry to have any harm happen to you," said Meg heartily.

harm - dano; dano, danar

"Thank you, that sounds pleasant," began Mr. Brooke, looking cheerful again, but before he could finish his speech, Ned, mounted on the old horse, came lumbering up to display his equestrian skill before the young ladies, and there was no more quiet that day.

mounted - montado; montar

equestrian - ecuestre

more quiet - más tranquilo

"Don't you love to ride?" asked Grace of Amy, as they stood resting after a race round the field with the others, led by Ned.

race round - ronda de carreras

"I dote upon it. My sister, Meg, used to ride when Papa was rich, but we don't keep any horses now, except Ellen Tree," added Amy, laughing.

dote - amoroso

"Tell me about Ellen Tree. Is it a donkey?" asked Grace curiously.

donkey - asno, burro, jumento, locomotora pequena, motor auxiliar

curiously - con curiosidad; curiosamente

"Why, you see, Jo is crazy about horses and so am I, but we've only got an old sidesaddle and no horse. Out in our garden is an apple tree that has a nice low branch, so Jo put the saddle on it, fixed some reins on the part that turns up, and we bounce away on Ellen Tree whenever we like."

sidesaddle - Sideaddle

reins - riendas; rienda

"How funny!" laughed Grace. "I have a pony at home, and ride nearly every day in the park with Fred and Kate. It's very nice, for my friends go too, and the Row is full of ladies and gentlemen."

pony - poni, póney

"Dear, how charming! I hope I shall go abroad some day, but I'd rather go to Rome than the Row," said Amy, who had not the remotest idea what the Row was and wouldn't have asked for the world.

go abroad - Ir al extranjero

Rome - Roma

Frank, sitting just behind the little girls, heard what they were saying, and pushed his crutch away from him with an impatient gesture as he watched the active lads going through all sorts of comical gymnastics. Beth, who was collecting the scattered Author cards, looked up and said, in her shy yet friendly way, "I'm afraid you are tired. Can I do anything for you?"

"Talk to me, please. It's dull, sitting by myself," answered Frank, who had evidently been used to being made much of at home.

If he asked her to deliver a Latin oration, it would not have seemed a more impossible task to bashful Beth, but there was no place to run to, no Jo to hide behind now, and the poor boy looked so wistfully at her that she bravely resolved to try.

"What do you like to talk about?" she asked, fumbling over the cards and dropping half as she tried to tie them up.

"Well, I like to hear about cricket and boating and hunting," said Frank, who had not yet learned to suit his amusements to his strength.

My heart! What shall I do? I don't know anything about them, thought Beth, and forgetting the boy's misfortune in her flurry, she said, hoping to make him talk, "I never saw any hunting, but I suppose you know all about it."

misfortune - infortunio, gafe, mala suerte, desgracia

"I did once, but I can never hunt again, for I got hurt leaping a confounded five-barred gate, so there are no more horses and hounds for me," said Frank with a sigh that made Beth hate herself for her innocent blunder.

leaping - saltando; saltar, brincar

hounds - sabuesos; perro de caza

"Your deer are much prettier than our ugly buffaloes," she said, turning to the prairies for help and feeling glad that she had read one of the boys'books in which Jo delighted.

deer - ciervo, venado

buffaloes - búfalos; búfalo, bisonte

prairies - praderas; pradera

Buffaloes proved soothing and satisfactory, and in her eagerness to amuse another, Beth forgot herself, and was quite unconscious of her sisters'surprise and delight at the unusual spectacle of Beth talking away to one of the dreadful boys, against whom she had begged protection.

soothing - calmante; tranquilizador, tranquilizante; (sooth); verdad

satisfactory - satisfactorio

eagerness - avidez, ansia

protection - protección

"Bless her heart! She pities him, so she is good to him," said Jo, beaming at her from the croquet ground.

pities - compasión, piedad, lástima, pena, tener lástima

beaming - rayos; radiante; (beam); viga, timón, radio

"I always said she was a little saint," added Meg, as if there could be no further doubt of it.

saint - Santo

"I haven't heard Frank laugh so much for ever so long," said Grace to Amy, as they sat discussing dolls and making tea sets out of the acorn cups.

acorn - bellota

"My sister Beth is a very fastidious girl, when she likes to be," said Amy, well pleased at Beth's success. She meant ˜facinating', but as Grace didn't know the exact meaning of either word, fastidious sounded well and made a good impression.

fastidious - astidioso; cicatero, quisquilloso, regodeón

facinating - fascinante

An impromptu circus, fox and geese, and an amicable game of croquet finished the afternoon. At sunset the tent was struck, hampers packed, wickets pulled up, boats loaded, and the whole party floated down the river, singing at the tops of their voices. Ned, getting sentimental, warbled a serenade with the pensive refrain...

impromptu - imprevisto; improvisado, impromptu

circus - circo

fox - zorro, zorra, raposo, traposa

amicable - amigable, amistoso, cordial

sunset - puesta de sol; puesta del sol, ocaso, atardecer

hampers - estas; estorbar, impedir, obstaculizar

loaded - cargado; carga

refrain - estribillo

Alone, alone, ah! Woe, alone,

woe - pena, infortunio, ay

and at the lines...

We each are young, we each have a heart,

Oh, why should we stand thus coldly apart?

coldly - fríamente

he looked at Meg with such a lackadaisical expression that she laughed outright and spoiled his song.

lackadaisical - despreocupado; lánguido

"How can you be so cruel to me?" he whispered, under cover of a lively chorus. "You've kept close to that starched-up Englishwoman all day, and now you snub me."

starched - lmidonado; almidón, almidonar

Englishwoman - inglesa

"I didn't mean to, but you looked so funny I really couldn't help it," replied Meg, passing over the first part of his reproach, for it was quite true that she had shunned him, remembering the Moffat party and the talk after it.

passing over - pasar por alto

reproach - reproche, vergüenza, reprochar, avergonzar, echar en cara algo

shunned - rechazado; evitar

Ned was offended and turned to Sallie for consolation, saying to her rather pettishly, "There isn't a bit of flirt in that girl, is there?"

consolation - consolación, consuelo, premio de consolación, premio de consuelo

pettishly - con petulancia

"Not a particle, but she's a dear," returned Sallie, defending her friend even while confessing her shortcomings.

defending - defendiendo; defender

confessing - confesando; confesar, panish: t-needed

shortcomings - deficiencias; defecto

"She's not a stricken deer anyway," said Ned, trying to be witty, and succeeding as well as very young gentlemen usually do.

On the lawn where it had gathered, the little party separated with cordial good nights and good-byes, for the Vaughns were going to Canada. As the four sisters went home through the garden, Miss Kate looked after them, saying, without the patronizing tone in her voice, "In spite of their demonstrative manners, American girls are very nice when one knows them."

cordial - cordial

Canada - Canadá

demonstrative - demostrativo

"I quite agree with you," said Mr. Brooke.

CHAPTER THIRTEEN. CASTLES IN THE AIR

Laurie lay luxuriously swinging to and fro in his hammock one warm September afternoon, wondering what his neighbors were about, but too lazy to go and find out. He was in one of his moods, for the day had been both unprofitable and unsatisfactory, and he was wishing he could live it over again.

hammock - hamaca, hamaca paraguaya

unprofitable - no es rentable; desaventajado

The hot weather made him indolent, and he had shirked his studies, tried Mr. Brooke's patience to the utmost, displeased his grandfather by practicing half the afternoon, frightened the maidservants half out of their wits by mischievously hinting that one of his dogs was going mad, and, after high words with the stableman about some fancied neglect of his horse, he had flung himself into his hammock to fume over the stupidity of the world in general, till the peace of the lovely day quieted him in spite of himself. Staring up into the green gloom of the horse-chestnut trees above him, he dreamed dreams of all sorts, and was just imagining himself tossing on the ocean in a voyage round the world, when the sound of voices brought him ashore in a flash. Peeping through the meshes of the hammock, he saw the Marches coming out, as if bound on some expedition.

shirked - ludido; esquivar

utmost - extremo, descollante, extremado, sobresaliente, sumo, máximo

maidservants - sirvientas; criada, moza

mischievously - con picardía; malvadamente

hinting - insinuación; pista, indicio, indirecta, buscapié, toque

going mad - volverse loco

flung - arrojado; arrojar, lanzar

stupidity - estupidez, burricie, tontería, idiotez

gloom - pesimismo; penumbra, melancolía

ashore - en tierra

flash - destello

meshes - mallas; malla, rejilla, engranaje

"Well, that's cool," said Laurie to himself, "to have a picnic and never ask me! They can't be going in the boat, for they haven't got the key. Perhaps they forgot it. I'll take it to them, and see what's going on."

Though possessed of half a dozen hats, it took him some time to find one, then there was a hunt for the key, which was at last discovered in his pocket, so that the girls were quite out of sight when he leaped the fence and ran after them. Taking the shortest way to the boathouse, he waited for them to appear, but no one came, and he went up the hill to take an observation.

leaped - saltó; saltar, brincar

A grove of pines covered one part of it, and from the heart of this green spot came a clearer sound than the soft sigh of the pines or the drowsy chirp of the crickets.

pines - pinos; pino

drowsy - somnoliento; adormecido, sonoliento, somnífero, soporífero

chirp - trino, chirrido, trinar, chirriar, grillar

Crickets - los grillos; críquet, cricket

"Here's a landscape!" thought Laurie, peeping through the bushes, and looking wide-awake and good-natured already.

landscape - paisaje, apaisado, horizontal

awake - despierto; despertar(se)

It was a rather pretty little picture, for the sisters sat together in the shady nook, with sun and shadow flickering over them, the aromatic wind lifting their hair and cooling their hot cheeks, and all the little wood people going on with their affairs as if these were no strangers but old friends. Meg sat upon her cushion, sewing daintily with her white hands, and looking as fresh and sweet as a rose in her pink dress among the green. Beth was sorting the cones that lay thick under the hemlock near by, for she made pretty things with them. Amy was sketching a group of ferns, and Jo was knitting as she read aloud.

nook - rincón, recoveco

flickering - parpadeo; vacilar

aromatic - aromático

cones - onos; cono, cono, estróbilo, checkcucurucho, checkbarquillo

hemlock - cicuta, falso abeto

sketching - bocetos; bosquejar, esbozar, pergenar, esbozo, bosquejo

A shadow passed over the boy's face as he watched them, feeling that he ought to go away because uninvited; yet lingering because home seemed very lonely and this quiet party in the woods most attractive to his restless spirit. He stood so still that a squirrel, busy with its harvesting, ran down a pine close beside him, saw him suddenly and skipped back, scolding so shrilly that Beth looked up, espied the wistful face behind the birches, and beckoned with a reassuring smile.

uninvited - sin invitación; no invitado

Lingering - Permaneciendo; (linger); permanecer, demorar, persistir

most attractive - el más atractivo

squirrel - ardilla

harvesting - cosecha, cosechar

pine - pino

skipped - saltado; saltar

scolding - reganar; regano, sermón, bronca, rapapolvo; (scold); reganar

shrilly - Gritando

espied - Espiar

birches - abedules; abedul

reassuring - tranquilizador; tranquilizar, reasegurar

"May I come in, please? Or shall I be a bother?" he asked, advancing slowly.

advancing - avanzando; avanzar, progresar, avance, progreso, adelanto

Meg lifted her eyebrows, but Jo scowled at her defiantly and said at once, "Of course you may. We should have asked you before, only we thought you wouldn't care for such a girl's game as this."

scowled - ceno fruncido; fruncir el ceno/entrecejo

"I always like your games, but if Meg doesn't want me, I'll go away."

"I've no objection, if you do something. It's against the rules to be idle here," replied Meg gravely but graciously.

"Much obliged. I'll do anything if you'll let me stop a bit, for it's as dull as the Desert of Sahara down there. Shall I sew, read, cone, draw, or do all at once? Bring on your bears. I'm ready." And Laurie sat down with a submissive expression delightful to behold.

Sahara - Sáhara, Sahara

cone - cono, cono, estróbilo, checkcucurucho, checkbarquillo

I'm ready - Estoy listo

submissive - sumiso, sumiso, sumisa

"Finish this story while I set my heel," said Jo, handing him the book.

heel - tacón; talón

"Yes'm." was the meek answer, as he began, doing his best to prove his gratitude for the favor of admission into the ˜Busy Bee Society'.

meek - dócil; modesto, humilde, resignado, sumiso, manso

The story was not a long one, and when it was finished, he ventured to ask a few questions as a reward of merit.

ventured - se aventuró; aventura, arriesgar

merit - mérito, merecimiento, meritar

"Please, ma'am, could I inquire if this highly instructive and charming institution is a new one?"

"Would you tell him?" asked Meg of her sisters.

"He'll laugh," said Amy warningly.

warningly - Advertidamente

"Who cares?" said Jo.

"I guess he'll like it," added Beth.

"Of course I shall! I give you my word I won't laugh. Tell away, Jo, and don't be afraid."

"The idea of being afraid of you! Well, you see we used to play Pilgrim's Progress, and we have been going on with it in earnest, all winter and summer."

"Yes, I know," said Laurie, nodding wisely.

nodding - Asintiendo; (nod); asentir, cabecear, cabezada

"Who told you?" demanded Jo.

"Spirits."

"No, I did. I wanted to amuse him one night when you were all away, and he was rather dismal. He did like it, so don't scold, Jo," said Beth meekly.

"You can't keep a secret. Never mind, it saves trouble now."

"Go on, please," said Laurie, as Jo became absorbed in her work, looking a trifle displeased.

"Oh, didn't she tell you about this new plan of ours? Well, we have tried not to waste our holiday, but each has had a task and worked at it with a will. The vacation is nearly over, the stints are all done, and we are ever so glad that we didn't dawdle."

stints - Período

"Yes, I should think so," and Laurie thought regretfully of his own idle days.

"Mother likes to have us out-of-doors as much as possible, so we bring our work here and have nice times. For the fun of it we bring our things in these bags, wear the old hats, use poles to climb the hill, and play pilgrims, as we used to do years ago. We call this hill the Delectable Mountain, for we can look far away and see the country where we hope to live some time."

poles - postes; polo

Jo pointed, and Laurie sat up to examine, for through an opening in the wood one could look cross the wide, blue river, the meadows on the other side, far over the outskirts of the great city, to the green hills that rose to meet the sky.

meadows - praderas; prado, vega

outskirts - a las afueras; afueras

The sun was low, and the heavens glowed with the splendor of an autumn sunset. Gold and purple clouds lay on the hilltops, and rising high into the ruddy light were silvery white peaks that shone like the airy spires of some Celestial City.

heavens - cielos; cielo, firmamento, paraíso

hilltops - Cima de la colina

ruddy - rubicundo

peaks - picos; pico, cumbre

spires - espiras; aguja

"How beautiful that is!" said Laurie softly, for he was quick to see and feel beauty of any kind.

"It's often so, and we like to watch it, for it is never the same, but always splendid," replied Amy, wishing she could paint it.

"Jo talks about the country where we hope to live sometime"the real country, she means, with pigs and chickens and haymaking. It would be nice, but I wish the beautiful country up there was real, and we could ever go to it," said Beth musingly.

musingly - Musitando

"There is a lovelier country even than that, where we shall go, by-and-by, when we are good enough," answered Meg with her sweetest voice.

"It seems so long to wait, so hard to do. I want to fly away at once, as those swallows fly, and go in at that splendid gate."

swallows - golondrinas; tragar, engullir

"You'll get there, Beth, sooner or later, no fear of that," said Jo. "I'm the one that will have to fight and work, and climb and wait, and maybe never get in after all."

"You'll have me for company, if that's any comfort. I shall have to do a deal of traveling before I come in sight of your Celestial City. If I arrive late, you'll say a good word for me, won't you, Beth?"

Something in the boy's face troubled his little friend, but she said cheerfully, with her quiet eyes on the changing clouds, "If people really want to go, and really try all their lives, I think they will get in, for I don't believe there are any locks on that door or any guards at the gate.

I always imagine it is as it is in the picture, where the shining ones stretch out their hands to welcome poor Christian as he comes up from the river."

"Wouldn't it be fun if all the castles in the air which we make could come true, and we could live in them?" said Jo, after a little pause.

"I've made such quantities it would be hard to choose which I'd have," said Laurie, lying flat and throwing cones at the squirrel who had betrayed him.

"You'd have to take your favorite one. What is it?" asked Meg.

"If I tell mine, will you tell yours?"

"Yes, if the girls will too."

"We will. Now, Laurie."

"After I'd seen as much of the world as I want to, I'd like to settle in Germany and have just as much music as I choose. I'm to be a famous musician myself, and all creation is to rush to hear me. And I'm never to be bothered about money or business, but just enjoy myself and live for what I like. That's my favorite castle. What's yours, Meg?"

creation - creación

bothered - molestado; molestar, agobiar, cansón, joroba, rayos, caramba

Margaret seemed to find it a little hard to tell hers, and waved a brake before her face, as if to disperse imaginary gnats, while she said slowly, "I should like a lovely house, full of all sorts of luxurious things"nice food, pretty clothes, handsome furniture, pleasant people, and heaps of money.

brake - freno; frenar

disperse - dispersarse; dispersar

gnats - mosquitos; mosquito

I am to be mistress of it, and manage it as I like, with plenty of servants, so I never need work a bit. How I should enjoy it! For I wouldn't be idle, but do good, and make everyone love me dearly."

"Wouldn't you have a master for your castle in the air?" asked Laurie slyly.

"I said ˜pleasant people', you know," and Meg carefully tied up her shoe as she spoke, so that no one saw her face.

"Why don't you say you'd have a splendid, wise, good husband and some angelic little children? You know your castle wouldn't be perfect without," said blunt Jo, who had no tender fancies yet, and rather scorned romance, except in books.

scorned - despreciado; despreciar, desdenar, menospreciar, rechazar

"You'd have nothing but horses, inkstands, and novels in yours," answered Meg petulantly.

inkstands - puestos de tinta; escribanía

"Wouldn't I though? I'd have a stable full of Arabian steeds, rooms piled high with books, and I'd write out of a magic inkstand, so that my works should be as famous as Laurie's music. I want to do something splendid before I go into my castle, something heroic or wonderful that won't be forgotten after I'm dead. I don't know what, but I'm on the watch for it, and mean to astonish you all some day.

Arabian - arabe; árabe

steeds - caballos; corcel

write out - escribir, hacer algo en papel

astonish - asombrar, sorprender, pasmar

I think I shall write books, and get rich and famous, that would suit me, so that is my favorite dream."

"Mine is to stay at home safe with Father and Mother, and help take care of the family," said Beth contentedly.

"Don't you wish for anything else?" asked Laurie.

"Since I had my little piano, I am perfectly satisfied. I only wish we may all keep well and be together, nothing else."

"I have ever so many wishes, but the pet one is to be an artist, and go to Rome, and do fine pictures, and be the best artist in the whole world," was Amy's modest desire.

"We're an ambitious set, aren't we? Every one of us, but Beth, wants to be rich and famous, and gorgeous in every respect. I do wonder if any of us will ever get our wishes," said Laurie, chewing grass like a meditative calf.

chewing - masticar, mascar

meditative - Meditativo

calf - ternero

"I've got the key to my castle in the air, but whether I can unlock the door remains to be seen," observed Jo mysteriously.

unlock - abrir, abrir con llave, desatrancar, desbloquear

"I've got the key to mine, but I'm not allowed to try it. Hang college!" muttered Laurie with an impatient sigh.

"Here's mine!" and Amy waved her pencil.

"I haven't got any," said Meg forlornly.

"Yes, you have," said Laurie at once.

"Where?"

"In your face."

"Nonsense, that's of no use."

"Wait and see if it doesn't bring you something worth having," replied the boy, laughing at the thought of a charming little secret which he fancied he knew.

Meg colored behind the brake, but asked no questions and looked across the river with the same expectant expression which Mr. Brooke had worn when he told the story of the knight.

expectant - esperando; expectante

"If we are all alive ten years hence, let's meet, and see how many of us have got our wishes, or how much nearer we are then than now," said Jo, always ready with a plan.

hence - de aquí, por lo tanto, por eso, de ahí

"Bless me! How old I shall be, twenty-seven!" exclaimed Meg, who felt grown up already, having just reached seventeen.

"You and I will be twenty-six, Teddy, Beth twenty-four, and Amy twenty-two. What a venerable party!" said Jo.

Teddy - oso de peluche

"I hope I shall have done something to be proud of by that time, but I'm such a lazy dog, I'm afraid I shall dawdle, Jo."

"You need a motive, Mother says, and when you get it, she is sure you'll work splendidly."

motive - motivo, móbil

splendidly - espléndidamente

"Is she? By Jupiter, I will, if I only get the chance!" cried Laurie, sitting up with sudden energy. "I ought to be satisfied to please Grandfather, and I do try, but it's working against the grain, you see, and comes hard. He wants me to be an India merchant, as he was, and I'd rather be shot. I hate tea and silk and spices, and every sort of rubbish his old ships bring, and I don't care how soon they go to the bottom when I own them. Going to college ought to satisfy him, for if I give him four years he ought to let me off from the business. But he's set, and I've got to do just as he did, unless I break away and please myself, as my father did. If there was anyone left to stay with the old gentleman, I'd do it tomorrow.

Jupiter - Júpiter

India - India

merchant - comerciante, mercader

spices - especias; especia

break away - separarse, distanciarse

Laurie spoke excitedly, and looked ready to carry his threat into execution on the slightest provocation, for he was growing up very fast and, in spite of his indolent ways, had a young man's hatred of subjection, a young man's restless longing to try the world for himself.

threat - amenaza

execution - ejecución

slightest - lo más mínimo; insignificante, leve, ligero, falta de respeto

provocation - provocación

subjection - sometimiento; sumisión

"I advise you to sail away in one of your ships, and never come home again till you have tried your own way," said Jo, whose imagination was fired by the thought of such a daring exploit, and whose sympathy was excited by what she called ˜Teddy's Wrongs'.

imagination - imaginación, magín

exploit - explotar; hazana, proeza, gesta, heroicidad

"That's not right, Jo. You mustn't talk in that way, and Laurie mustn't take your bad advice. You should do just what your grandfather wishes, my dear boy," said Meg in her most maternal tone. "Do your best at college, and when he sees that you try to please him, I'm sure he won't be hard on you or unjust to you.

unjust - injusto

As you say, there is no one else to stay with and love him, and you'd never forgive yourself if you left him without his permission. Don't be dismal or fret, but do your duty and you'll get your reward, as good Mr. Brooke has, by being respected and loved."

"What do you know about him?" asked Laurie, grateful for the good advice, but objecting to the lecture, and glad to turn the conversation from himself after his unusual outbreak.

objecting to - oponerse a

outbreak - brote, irrupción

"Only what your grandpa told us about him, how he took good care of his own mother till she died, and wouldn't go abroad as tutor to some nice person because he wouldn't leave her. And how he provides now for an old woman who nursed his mother, and never tells anyone, but is just as generous and patient and good as he can be."

"So he is, dear old fellow!" said Laurie heartily, as Meg paused, looking flushed and earnest with her story. "It's like Grandpa to find out all about him without letting him know, and to tell all his goodness to others, so that they might like him. Brooke couldn't understand why your mother was so kind to him, asking him over with me and treating him in her beautiful friendly way.

He thought she was just perfect, and talked about it for days and days, and went on about you all in flaming style. If ever I do get my wish, you see what I'll do for Brooke."

flaming - en llamas; llameante; (flame); flama, llama

"Begin to do something now by not plaguing his life out," said Meg sharply.

plaguing - plagando; plaga, peste, plagar, molestar, atormentar

"How do you know I do, Miss?"

"I can always tell by his face when he goes away. If you have been good, he looks satisfied and walks briskly. If you have plagued him, he's sober and walks slowly, as if he wanted to go back and do his work better."

plagued - plagado; plaga, peste, plagar, molestar, atormentar

"Well, I like that? So you keep an account of my good and bad marks in Brooke's face, do you? I see him bow and smile as he passes your window, but I didn't know you'd got up a telegraph."

"We haven't. Don't be angry, and oh, don't tell him I said anything! It was only to show that I cared how you get on, and what is said here is said in confidence, you know," cried Meg, much alarmed at the thought of what might follow from her careless speech.

"I don't tell tales," replied Laurie, with his ˜high and mighty'air, as Jo called a certain expression which he occasionally wore. "Only if Brooke is going to be a thermometer, I must mind and have fair weather for him to report."

mighty - poderoso

Occasionally - ocasionalmente, de vez en cuando, a veces

thermometer - termómetro

"Please don't be offended. I didn't mean to preach or tell tales or be silly. I only thought Jo was encouraging you in a feeling which you'd be sorry for by-and-by. You are so kind to us, we feel as if you were our brother and say just what we think. Forgive me, I meant it kindly." And Meg offered her hand with a gesture both affectionate and timid.

Ashamed of his momentary pique, Laurie squeezed the kind little hand, and said frankly, "I'm the one to be forgiven. I'm cross and have been out of sorts all day. I like to have you tell me my faults and be sisterly, so don't mind if I am grumpy sometimes. I thank you all the same."

Bent on showing that he was not offended, he made himself as agreeable as possible, wound cotton for Meg, recited poetry to please Jo, shook down cones for Beth, and helped Amy with her ferns, proving himself a fit person to belong to the ˜Busy Bee Society'.

wound - Herida

recited - Recitar

In the midst of an animated discussion on the domestic habits of turtles (one of those amiable creatures having strolled up from the river), the faint sound of a bell warned them that Hannah had put the tea ˜to draw', and they would just have time to get home to supper.

animated - animado, animar

turtles - tortugas; tortuga marina

"May I come again?" asked Laurie.

"Yes, if you are good, and love your book, as the boys in the primer are told to do," said Meg, smiling.

primer - Imprimación; (prim) Imprimación

"I'll try."

"Then you may come, and I'll teach you to knit as the Scotchmen do. There's a demand for socks just now," added Jo, waving hers like a big blue worsted banner as they parted at the gate.

Scotchmen - Escocés

demand - demanda, exigencia, exigir, demandar

banner - bandera, estandarte

That night, when Beth played to Mr. Laurence in the twilight, Laurie, standing in the shadow of the curtain, listened to the little David, whose simple music always quieted his moody spirit, and watched the old man, who sat with his gray head on his hand, thinking tender thoughts of the dead child he had loved so much.

played to - se ha jugado a...

David - David

Remembering the conversation of the afternoon, the boy said to himself, with the resolve to make the sacrifice cheerfully, "I'll let my castle go, and stay with the dear old gentleman while he needs me, for I am all he has."

sacrifice - sacrificar, sacrificio

CHAPTER FOURTEEN. SECRETS

Jo was very busy in the garret, for the October days began to grow chilly, and the afternoons were short. For two or three hours the sun lay warmly in the high window, showing Jo seated on the old sofa, writing busily, with her papers spread out upon a trunk before her, while Scrabble, the pet rat, promenaded the beams overhead, accompanied by his oldest son, a fine young fellow, who was evidently very proud of his whiskers.

chilly - frío

promenaded - paseó; paseo, pasear

overhead - sobrecarga; arriba, por encima de la cabeza; aéreo

whiskers - bigotes; vibrisa, bigote

Quite absorbed in her work, Jo scribbled away till the last page was filled, when she signed her name with a flourish and threw down her pen, exclaiming...

scribbled - arabateado; garabatear

"There, I've done my best! If this won't suit I shall have to wait till I can do better."

Lying back on the sofa, she read the manuscript carefully through, making dashes here and there, and putting in many exclamation points, which looked like little balloons. Then she tied it up with a smart red ribbon, and sat a minute looking at it with a sober, wistful expression, which plainly showed how earnest her work had been. Jo's desk up here was an old tin kitchen which hung against the wall.

balloons - globos; globo, vejiga, bomba

In it she kept her papers, and a few books, safely shut away from Scrabble, who, being likewise of a literary turn, was fond of making a circulating library of such books as were left in his way by eating the leaves. From this tin receptacle Jo produced another manuscript, and putting both in her pocket, crept quietly downstairs, leaving her friends to nibble on her pens and taste her ink.

likewise - similarmente, igualmente

circulating - circulando; circular

receptacle - recipiente, receptáculo

nibble - mordisquear, picar

She put on her hat and jacket as noiselessly as possible, and going to the back entry window, got out upon the roof of a low porch, swung herself down to the grassy bank, and took a roundabout way to the road. Once there, she composed herself, hailed a passing omnibus, and rolled away to town, looking very merry and mysterious.

grassy - hierba; herboso

roundabout - rotonda, glorieta, redoma, tiovivo, desvío

hailed - aclamado; granizo

omnibus - autobús, compilación, antología semanal

There was a dentist's sign, among others, which adorned the entrance, and after staring a moment at the pair of artificial jaws which slowly opened and shut to draw attention to a fine set of teeth, the young gentleman put on his coat, took his hat, and went down to post himself in the opposite doorway, saying with a smile and a shiver, "It's like her to come alone, but if she has a bad time she'll need someone to help her home."

adorned - dornado; adornar, engalanar

artificial - artificial

jaws - mandíbulas; maxilar

doorway - puerta; entrada

In ten minutes Jo came running downstairs with a very red face and the general appearance of a person who had just passed through a trying ordeal of some sort. When she saw the young gentleman she looked anything but pleased, and passed him with a nod. But he followed, asking with an air of sympathy, "Did you have a bad time?"

ordeal - un calvario; calvario, suplicio, prueba del fuego, ordalía

"Not very."

"You got through quickly."

"Yes, thank goodness!"

"Why did you go alone?"

"Didn't want anyone to know."

"You're the oddest fellow I ever saw. How many did you have out?"

Jo looked at her friend as if she did not understand him, then began to laugh as if mightily amused at something.

mightily - oderosamente

"There are two which I want to have come out, but I must wait a week."

"What are you laughing at? You are up to some mischief, Jo," said Laurie, looking mystified.

"So are you. What were you doing, sir, up in that billiard saloon?"

billiard - Billar

"Begging your pardon, ma'am, it wasn't a billiard saloon, but a gymnasium, and I was taking a lesson in fencing."

begging - Mendigando; (beg) Mendigando

gymnasium - gimnasio, instituto

"I'm glad of that."

I'm glad of that - Me alegro de eso

"Why?"

"You can teach me, and then when we play Hamlet, you can be Laertes, and we'll make a fine thing of the fencing scene."

hamlet - aldehuela, caserío, aldea, villar

Laurie burst out with a hearty boy's laugh, which made several passers-by smile in spite of themselves.

"I'll teach you whether we play Hamlet or not. It's grand fun and will straighten you up capitally. But I don't believe that was your only reason for saying ˜I'm glad'in that decided way, was it now?"

straighten - estirar (hair), desencorvar, destorcer, enderezar

"No, I was glad that you were not in the saloon, because I hope you never go to such places. Do you?"

"Not often."

"I wish you wouldn't."

"It's no harm, Jo. I have billiards at home, but it's no fun unless you have good players, so, as I'm fond of it, I come sometimes and have a game with Ned Moffat or some of the other fellows."

billiards - Billar

players - jugadores; jugador, jugadora, actor, instrumentista

"Oh, dear, I'm so sorry, for you'll get to liking it better and better, and will waste time and money, and grow like those dreadful boys. I did hope you'd stay respectable and be a satisfaction to your friends," said Jo, shaking her head.

respectable - respetable

"Can't a fellow take a little innocent amusement now and then without losing his respectability?" asked Laurie, looking nettled.

respectability - respetabilidad

nettled - molesto; ortiga, picar, checkirritar, checkprovocar

"That depends upon how and where he takes it. I don't like Ned and his set, and wish you'd keep out of it. Mother won't let us have him at our house, though he wants to come. And if you grow like him she won't be willing to have us frolic together as we do now."

"Won't she?" asked Laurie anxiously.

"No, she can't bear fashionable young men, and she'd shut us all up in bandboxes rather than have us associate with them."

"Well, she needn't get out her bandboxes yet. I'm not a fashionable party and don't mean to be, but I do like harmless larks now and then, don't you?"

"Yes, nobody minds them, so lark away, but don't get wild, will you? Or there will be an end of all our good times."

"I'll be a double distilled saint."

distilled - Destilar

Saint - San, Santa, Santo

"I can't bear saints. Just be a simple, honest, respectable boy, and we'll never desert you. I don't know what I should do if you acted like Mr. king's son. He had plenty of money, but didn't know how to spend it, and got tipsy and gambled, and ran away, and forged his father's name, I believe, and was altogether horrid."

Saints - santos; San, Santa, Santo

king's son - el hijo del rey

tipsy - borracho; achispado, piripi, irse, irse al otro barrio

gambled - apostado; apuesta, apostar, jugar

forged - falsificado; forja

"You think I'm likely to do the same? Much obliged."

"No, I don't"oh, dear, no!"but I hear people talking about money being such a temptation, and I sometimes wish you were poor. I shouldn't worry then."

"Do you worry about me, Jo?"

"A little, when you look moody and discontented, as you sometimes do, for you've got such a strong will, if you once get started wrong, I'm afraid it would be hard to stop you."

Laurie walked in silence a few minutes, and Jo watched him, wishing she had held her tongue, for his eyes looked angry, though his lips smiled as if at her warnings.

warnings - advertencias; advertencia, aviso, precaución, cuidado

"Are you going to deliver lectures all the way home?" he asked presently.

"Of course not. Why?"

"Because if you are, I'll take a bus. If you're not, I'd like to walk with you and tell you something very interesting."

"I won't preach any more, and I'd like to hear the news immensely."

"Very well, then, come on. It's a secret, and if I tell you, you must tell me yours."

"I haven't got any," began Jo, but stopped suddenly, remembering that she had.

"You know you have"you can't hide anything, so up and 'fess, or I won't tell," cried Laurie.

"Is your secret a nice one?"

"Oh, isn't it! All about people you know, and such fun! You ought to hear it, and I've been aching to tell it this long time. Come, you begin."

"You'll not say anything about it at home, will you?"

"Not a word."

"And you won't tease me in private?"

"I never tease."

"Yes, you do. You get everything you want out of people. I don't know how you do it, but you are a born wheedler."

"Thank you. Fire away."

Fire away - Disparar

"Well, I've left two stories with a newspaperman, and he's to give his answer next week," whispered Jo, in her confidant's ear.

newspaperman - periodista

"Hurrah for Miss March, the celebrated American authoress!" cried Laurie, throwing up his hat and catching it again, to the great delight of two ducks, four cats, five hens, and half a dozen Irish children, for they were out of the city now.

authoress - autora

ducks - patos; hundir, sumergir

hens - gallinas; gallina

"Hush! It won't come to anything, I dare say, but I couldn't rest till I had tried, and I said nothing about it because I didn't want anyone else to be disappointed."

"It won't fail. Why, Jo, your stories are works of Shakespeare compared to half the rubbish that is published every day. Won't it be fun to see them in print, and shan't we feel proud of our authoress?"

Jo's eyes sparkled, for it is always pleasant to be believed in, and a friend's praise is always sweeter than a dozen newspaper puffs.

sparkled - brillaba; centelleo, destello

puffs - inhalaciones; soplo, racha, ráfaga; bocanada

"Where's your secret? Play fair, Teddy, or I'll never believe you again," she said, trying to extinguish the brilliant hopes that blazed up at a word of encouragement.

extinguish - extinguir, apagar

blazed up - encender, llamear; explotar

encouragement - aliento; apoyo

"I may get into a scrape for telling, but I didn't promise not to, so I will, for I never feel easy in my mind till I've told you any plummy bit of news I get. I know where Meg's glove is."

"Is that all?" said Jo, looking disappointed, as Laurie nodded and twinkled with a face full of mysterious intelligence.

twinkled - parpadeó; titilar, fulgurar, refulgir

"It's quite enough for the present, as you'll agree when I tell you where it is."

"Tell, then."

Laurie bent, and whispered three words in Jo's ear, which produced a comical change. She stood and stared at him for a minute, looking both surprised and displeased, then walked on, saying sharply, "How do you know?"

"Saw it."

"Where?"

"Pocket."

"All this time?"

"Yes, isn't that romantic?"

"No, it's horrid."

"Don't you like it?"

"Of course I don't. It's ridiculous, it won't be allowed. My patience! What would Meg say?"

"You are not to tell anyone. Mind that."

"I didn't promise."

"That was understood, and I trusted you."

"Well, I won't for the present, anyway, but I'm disgusted, and wish you hadn't told me."

"I thought you'd be pleased."

"At the idea of anybody coming to take Meg away? No, thank you."

"You'll feel better about it when somebody comes to take you away."

"I'd like to see anyone try it," cried Jo fiercely.

fiercely - con fiereza; fieramente

"So should I!" and Laurie chuckled at the idea.

chuckled - se rió; reírse (entre dientes)

"I don't think secrets agree with me, I feel rumpled up in my mind since you told me that," said Jo rather ungratefully.

ungratefully - desagradecidamente

"Race down this hill with me, and you'll be all right," suggested Laurie.

No one was in sight, the smooth road sloped invitingly before her, and finding the temptation irresistible, Jo darted away, soon leaving hat and comb behind her and scattering hairpins as she ran. Laurie reached the goal first and was quite satisfied with the success of his treatment, for his Atlanta came panting up with flying hair, bright eyes, ruddy cheeks, and no signs of dissatisfaction in her face.

smooth road - camino liso; sin obstáculos

sloped - nclinado; pendiente, cuesta, desnivel, inclinación, ojo chueco

invitingly - Apetecible

darted - dardo, flechilla

comb - peine

Atlanta - Atlanta

dissatisfaction - insatisfacción; descontento, malcontento, disgusto, malestar

"I wish I was a horse, then I could run for miles in this splendid air, and not lose my breath. It was capital, but see what a guy it's made me. Go, pick up my things, like a cherub, as you are," said Jo, dropping down under a maple tree, which was carpeting the bank with crimson leaves.

cherub - querubín

maple - arce

Laurie leisurely departed to recover the lost property, and Jo bundled up her braids, hoping no one would pass by till she was tidy again. But someone did pass, and who should it be but Meg, looking particularly ladylike in her state and festival suit, for she had been making calls.

leisurely - con calma

recover - recuperarse

lost property - Propiedad perdida; objetos perdidos

braids - trenzas; trenzar

"What in the world are you doing here?" she asked, regarding her disheveled sister with well-bred surprise.

"Getting leaves," meekly answered Jo, sorting the rosy handful she had just swept up.

"And hairpins," added Laurie, throwing half a dozen into Jo's lap. "They grow on this road, Meg, so do combs and brown straw hats."

combs - peines; peine

straw hats - Sombreros de paja

"You have been running, Jo. How could you? When will you stop such romping ways?" said Meg reprovingly, as she settled her cuffs and smoothed her hair, with which the wind had taken liberties.

reprovingly - Reprobando

cuffs - esposas; puno

liberties - ibertades; libertad

"Never till I'm stiff and old and have to use a crutch. Don't try to make me grow up before my time, Meg. It's hard enough to have you change all of a sudden. Let me be a little girl as long as I can."

As she spoke, Jo bent over the leaves to hide the trembling of her lips, for lately she had felt that Margaret was fast getting to be a woman, and Laurie's secret made her dread the separation which must surely come some time and now seemed very near. He saw the trouble in her face and drew Meg's attention from it by asking quickly, "Where have you been calling, all so fine?"

dread - miedo; temer, pavor, temor

"At the Gardiners', and Sallie has been telling me all about Belle Moffat's wedding. It was very splendid, and they have gone to spend the winter in Paris. Just think how delightful that must be!"

"Do you envy her, Meg?" said Laurie.

"I'm afraid I do."

"I'm glad of it!" muttered Jo, tying on her hat with a jerk.

"Why?" asked Meg, looking surprised.

"Because if you care much about riches, you will never go and marry a poor man," said Jo, frowning at Laurie, who was mutely warning her to mind what she said.

frowning - frunciendo el ceno; fruncir el ceno

mutely - En silencio

"I shall never ˜go and marry'anyone," observed Meg, walking on with great dignity while the others followed, laughing, whispering, skipping stones, and ˜behaving like children', as Meg said to herself, though she might have been tempted to join them if she had not had her best dress on.

skipping - saltando; saltar

For a week or two, Jo behaved so queerly that her sisters were quite bewildered. She rushed to the door when the postman rang, was rude to Mr. Brooke whenever they met, would sit looking at Meg with a woe-begone face, occasionally jumping up to shake and then kiss her in a very mysterious manner. Laurie and she were always making signs to one another, and talking about ˜Spread Eagles'till the girls declared they had both lost their wits.

postman - cartero

begone - Desaparecer

jumping up - Saltar arriba

eagles - águilas; águila

On the second Saturday after Jo got out of the window, Meg, as she sat sewing at her window, was scandalized by the sight of Laurie chasing Jo all over the garden and finally capturing her in Amy's bower. What went on there, Meg could not see, but shrieks of laughter were heard, followed by the murmur of voices and a great flapping of newspapers.

chasing - Persiguiendo; (chas) Persiguiendo

capturing - capturando; captura, capturar

shrieks - gritos; alarido, chillido, chillar

"What shall we do with that girl? She never will behave like a young lady," sighed Meg, as she watched the race with a disapproving face.

"I hope she won't. She is so funny and dear as she is," said Beth, who had never betrayed that she was a little hurt at Jo's having secrets with anyone but her.

"It's very trying, but we never can make her commy la fo," added Amy, who sat making some new frills for herself, with her curls tied up in a very becoming way, two agreeable things that made her feel unusually elegant and ladylike.

commy - Comi

In a few minutes Jo bounced in, laid herself on the sofa, and affected to read.

"Have you anything interesting there?" asked Meg, with condescension.

"Nothing but a story, won't amount to much, I guess," returned Jo, carefully keeping the name of the paper out of sight.

"You'd better read it aloud. That will amuse us and keep you out of mischief," said Amy in her most grown-up tone.

"What's the name?" asked Beth, wondering why Jo kept her face behind the sheet.

"The Rival Painters."

rival - rival

"That sounds well. Read it," said Meg.

With a loud "Hem!" and a long breath, Jo began to read very fast. The girls listened with interest, for the tale was romantic, and somewhat pathetic, as most of the characters died in the end. "I like that about the splendid picture," was Amy's approving remark, as Jo paused.

approving - aprobando; aprobar; tener un buen concepto de

remark - observación, comentario

"I prefer the lovering part. Viola and Angelo are two of our favorite names, isn't that queer?" said Meg, wiping her eyes, for the lovering part was tragical.

lovering - amando

wiping - Limpiar; (wipe) Limpiar

"Who wrote it?" asked Beth, who had caught a glimpse of Jo's face.

The reader suddenly sat up, cast away the paper, displaying a flushed countenance, and with a funny mixture of solemnity and excitement replied in a loud voice, "Your sister."

"You?" cried Meg, dropping her work.

"It's very good," said Amy critically.

"I knew it! I knew it! Oh, my Jo, I am so proud!" and Beth ran to hug her sister and exult over this splendid success.

hug - abrazo, abrazar

Dear me, how delighted they all were, to be sure! How Meg wouldn't believe it till she saw the words. "Miss Josephine March," actually printed in the paper. How graciously Amy criticized the artistic parts of the story, and offered hints for a sequel, which unfortunately couldn't be carried out, as the hero and heroine were dead. How Beth got excited, and skipped and sang with joy. How Hannah came in to exclaim, "Sakes alive, well I never!

sequel - secuela

heroine - heroína

got excited - se emocionó

exclaim - exclamar

in great astonishment at ˜that Jo's doin's'. How proud Mrs. March was when she knew it. How Jo laughed, with tears in her eyes, as she declared she might as well be a peacock and done with it, and how the ˜Spread Eagle'might be said to flap his wings triumphantly over the House of March, as the paper passed from hand to hand.

astonishment - asombro, estupefacción, sorpresa, extraneza

doin - Haciendo

eagle - águila

flap - solapa; faldón

"Tell us about it." "When did it come?" "How much did you get for it?" "What will Father say?" "Won't Laurie laugh?" cried the family, all in one breath as they clustered about Jo, for these foolish, affectionate people made a jubilee of every little household joy.

clustered - agrupados; amontonamiento, agrupamiento, aglomeración, racimo

Jubilee - jubileo

"Stop jabbering, girls, and I'll tell you everything," said Jo, wondering if Miss Burney felt any grander over her Evelina than she did over her ˜Rival Painters'. Having told how she disposed of her tales, Jo added, "And when I went to get my answer, the man said he liked them both, but didn't pay beginners, only let them print in his paper, and noticed the stories. It was good practice, he said, and when the beginners improved, anyone would pay.

jabbering - farfullando; (jabber) farfullando

grander - más grande; magnífico, espléndido, imponente

disposed - dispuesto; deshacerse

beginners - principiantes; principiante, novato, novillo, bisono

So I let him have the two stories, and today this was sent to me, and Laurie caught me with it and insisted on seeing it, so I let him. And he said it was good, and I shall write more, and he's going to get the next paid for, and I am so happy, for in time I may be able to support myself and help the girls."

Jo's breath gave out here, and wrapping her head in the paper, she bedewed her little story with a few natural tears, for to be independent and earn the praise of those she loved were the dearest wishes of her heart, and this seemed to be the first step toward that happy end.

CHAPTER FIFTEEN. A TELEGRAM

"November is the most disagreeable month in the whole year," said Margaret, standing at the window one dull afternoon, looking out at the frostbitten garden.

frostbitten - congelado; congelamiento, congelación, congelar

"That's the reason I was born in it," observed Jo pensively, quite unconscious of the blot on her nose.

pensively - pensativo; pensativamente

"If something very pleasant should happen now, we should think it a delightful month," said Beth, who took a hopeful view of everything, even November.

"I dare say, but nothing pleasant ever does happen in this family," said Meg, who was out of sorts. "We go grubbing along day after day, without a bit of change, and very little fun. We might as well be in a treadmill."

Treadmill - cinta ergométrica, máquina de caminar, andadora, caminadora

"My patience, how blue we are!" cried Jo. "I don't much wonder, poor dear, for you see other girls having splendid times, while you grind, grind, year in and year out. Oh, don't I wish I could manage things for you as I do for my heroines! You're pretty enough and good enough already, so I'd have some rich relation leave you a fortune unexpectedly.

grind - moler, triturar, picar

heroines - heroínas; heroína

unexpectedly - inesperadamente, inopinadamente

Then you'd dash out as an heiress, scorn everyone who has slighted you, go abroad, and come home my Lady Something in a blaze of splendor and elegance."

heiress - heredera

slighted - despreciado; insignificante, leve, ligero, falta de respeto

"People don't have fortunes left them in that style nowadays, men have to work and women marry for money. It's a dreadfully unjust world," said Meg bitterly.

nowadays - actualmente, ahora, hoy en día, hoy día, hogano

"Jo and I are going to make fortunes for you all. Just wait ten years, and see if we don't," said Amy, who sat in a corner making mud pies, as Hannah called her little clay models of birds, fruit, and faces.

clay - arcilla, barro

"Can't wait, and I'm afraid I haven't much faith in ink and dirt, though I'm grateful for your good intentions."

Meg sighed, and turned to the frostbitten garden again. Jo groaned and leaned both elbows on the table in a despondent attitude, but Amy spatted away energetically, and Beth, who sat at the other window, said, smiling, "Two pleasant things are going to happen right away. Marmee is coming down the street, and Laurie is tramping through the garden as if he had something nice to tell."

despondent - desanimado; abatido, descorazonado

spatted - Escupir

energetically - enérgicamente

In they both came, Mrs. March with her usual question, "Any letter from Father, girls?" and Laurie to say in his persuasive way, "Won't some of you come for a drive? I've been working away at mathematics till my head is in a muddle, and I'm going to freshen my wits by a brisk turn.

freshen - Refrescar

brisk - brioso, enérgico, vital, vigorizante, brusco

It's a dull day, but the air isn't bad, and I'm going to take Brooke home, so it will be gay inside, if it isn't out. Come, Jo, you and Beth will go, won't you?"

"Of course we will."

"Much obliged, but I'm busy." And Meg whisked out her workbasket, for she had agreed with her mother that it was best, for her at least, not to drive too often with the young gentleman.

workbasket - Cesta de trabajo

"We three will be ready in a minute," cried Amy, running away to wash her hands.

"Can I do anything for you, Madam Mother?" asked Laurie, leaning over Mrs. March's chair with the affectionate look and tone he always gave her.

"No, thank you, except call at the office, if you'll be so kind, dear. It's our day for a letter, and the postman hasn't been. Father is as regular as the sun, but there's some delay on the way, perhaps."

A sharp ring interrupted her, and a minute after Hannah came in with a letter.

"It's one of them horrid telegraph things, mum," she said, handling it as if she was afraid it would explode and do some damage.

handling - manipulación; (handle) manipulación

At the word ˜telegraph', Mrs. March snatched it, read the two lines it contained, and dropped back into her chair as white as if the little paper had sent a bullet to her heart. Laurie dashed downstairs for water, while Meg and Hannah supported her, and Jo read aloud, in a frightened voice...

bullet - bala

dashed - dashed; raya, guion largo, carrerita, gota, pizca, lanzarse

Mrs. March:

Your husband is very ill. Come at once.

S. HALE

Blank Hospital, Washington.

How still the room was as they listened breathlessly, how strangely the day darkened outside, and how suddenly the whole world seemed to change, as the girls gathered about their mother, feeling as if all the happiness and support of their lives was about to be taken from them.

strangely - extranamente; extranamente

Mrs. March was herself again directly, read the message over, and stretched out her arms to her daughters, saying, in a tone they never forgot, "I shall go at once, but it may be too late. Oh, children, children, help me to bear it!"

For several minutes there was nothing but the sound of sobbing in the room, mingled with broken words of comfort, tender assurances of help, and hopeful whispers that died away in tears. Poor Hannah was the first to recover, and with unconscious wisdom she set all the rest a good example, for with her, work was panacea for most afflictions.

whispers - susurros; susurro, rumor, rastro, susurrar

panacea - panacea, curalotodo

afflictions - flicciones; aflicción, tribulación, quebranto

"The Lord keep the dear man! I won't waste no time a-cryin', but git your things ready right away, mum," she said heartily, as she wiped her face on her apron, gave her mistress a warm shake of the hand with her own hard one, and went away to work like three women in one.

cryin - Llorando

"She's right, there's no time for tears now. Be calm, girls, and let me think."

They tried to be calm, poor things, as their mother sat up, looking pale but steady, and put away her grief to think and plan for them.

"Where's Laurie?" she asked presently, when she had collected her thoughts and decided on the first duties to be done.

"Here, ma'am. Oh, let me do something!" cried the boy, hurrying from the next room whither he had withdrawn, feeling that their first sorrow was too sacred for even his friendly eyes to see.

whither - ?adónde?

withdrawn - retirada; retirar(se)

sacred - sagrado

"Send a telegram saying I will come at once. The next train goes early in the morning. I'll take that."

"What else? The horses are ready. I can go anywhere, do anything," he said, looking ready to fly to the ends of the earth.

"Leave a note at Aunt March's. Jo, give me that pen and paper."

tearing off the blank side of one of her newly copied pages, Jo drew the table before her mother, well knowing that money for the long, sad journey must be borrowed, and feeling as if she could do anything to add a little to the sum for her father.

tearing off - arrancar, salir disparado

"Now go, dear, but don't kill yourself driving at a desperate pace. There is no need of that."

desperate - desesperado

pace - paso

Mrs. March's warning was evidently thrown away, for five minutes later Laurie tore by the window on his own fleet horse, riding as if for his life.

tore - Romper

"Jo, run to the rooms, and tell Mrs. King that I can't come. On the way get these things. I'll put them down, they'll be needed and I must go prepared for nursing. Hospital stores are not always good. Beth, go and ask Mr. Laurence for a couple of bottles of old wine.

I'm not too proud to beg for Father. He shall have the best of everything. Amy, tell Hannah to get down the black trunk, and Meg, come and help me find my things, for I'm half bewildered."

Writing, thinking, and directing all at once might well bewilder the poor lady, and Meg begged her to sit quietly in her room for a little while, and let them work. Everyone scattered like leaves before a gust of wind, and the quiet, happy household was broken up as suddenly as if the paper had been an evil spell.

bewilder - confundir, desconcertar

Mr. Laurence came hurrying back with Beth, bringing every comfort the kind old gentleman could think of for the invalid, and friendliest promises of protection for the girls during the mother's absence, which comforted her very much. There was nothing he didn't offer, from his own dressing gown to himself as escort. But the last was impossible. Mrs. March would not hear of the old gentleman's undertaking the long journey, yet an expression of relief was visible when he spoke of it, for anxiety ill fits one for traveling.

absence - ausencia, falta, ausencia de hierro

undertaking - emprender; funeraria, emprendimiento; (undertake); emprender

anxiety - zozobra, ansiedad, inquietud

He saw the look, knit his heavy eyebrows, rubbed his hands, and marched abruptly away, saying he'd be back directly. No one had time to think of him again till, as Meg ran through the entry, with a pair of rubbers in one hand and a cup of tea in the other, she came suddenly upon Mr. Brooke.

"I'm very sorry to hear of this, Miss March," he said, in the kind, quiet tone which sounded very pleasantly to her perturbed spirit. "I came to offer myself as escort to your mother. Mr. Laurence has commissions for me in Washington, and it will give me real satisfaction to be of service to her there."

perturbed - molesto; perturbar

commissions - comisiones; misión, cometido, destino, cargo, comisión, encargo

Down dropped the rubbers, and the tea was very near following, as Meg put out her hand, with a face so full of gratitude that Mr. Brooke would have felt repaid for a much greater sacrifice than the trifling one of time and comfort which he was about to take.

repaid - pagado; devolver, pagar

"How kind you all are! Mother will accept, I'm sure, and it will be such a relief to know that she has someone to take care of her. Thank you very, very much!"

Meg spoke earnestly, and forgot herself entirely till something in the brown eyes looking down at her made her remember the cooling tea, and lead the way into the parlor, saying she would call her mother.

Everything was arranged by the time Laurie returned with a note from Aunt March, enclosing the desired sum, and a few lines repeating what she had often said before, that she had always told them it was absurd for March to go into the army, always predicted that no good would come of it, and she hoped they would take her advice the next time.

Mrs. March put the note in the fire, the money in her purse, and went on with her preparations, with her lips folded tightly in a way which Jo would have understood if she had been there.

The short afternoon wore away. All other errands were done, and Meg and her mother busy at some necessary needlework, while Beth and Amy got tea, and Hannah finished her ironing with what she called a ˜slap and a bang', but still Jo did not come. They began to get anxious, and Laurie went off to find her, for no one knew what freak Jo might take into her head. He missed her, however, and she came walking in with a very queer expression of countenance, for there was a mixture of fun and fear, satisfaction and regret in it, which puzzled the family as much as did the roll of bills she laid before her mother, saying with a little choke in her voice, "That's my contribution toward making Father comfortable and bringing him home!

freak - monstruo; fenómeno

choke - ahogarse; ahogar, asfixiar

contribution - contribución, aporte, cotización

"My dear, where did you get it? Twenty-five dollars! Jo, I hope you haven't done anything rash?"

"No, It's mine honestly. I didn't beg, borrow, or steal it. I earned it, and I don't think you'll blame me, for I only sold what was my own."

It's mine - Es mío

honestly - honestamente, francamente

As she spoke, Jo took off her bonnet, and a general outcry arose, for all her abundant hair was cut short.

outcry - protesta

abundant - abundante, copioso, cuantioso

"Your hair! Your beautiful hair!" "Oh, Jo, how could you? Your one beauty." "My dear girl, there was no need of this." "She doesn't look like my Jo any more, but I love her dearly for it!"

As everyone exclaimed, and Beth hugged the cropped head tenderly, Jo assumed an indifferent air, which did not deceive anyone a particle, and said, rumpling up the brown bush and trying to look as if she liked it, "It doesn't affect the fate of the nation, so don't wail, Beth. It will be good for my vanity, I was getting too proud of my wig.

cropped - recortada; cultivo; cosecha

indifferent - indiferente

deceive - enganar; enganar, decebir

bush - arbusto

wail - aullido; llorar, gimotear; ulular; planir

It will do my brains good to have that mop taken off. My head feels deliciously light and cool, and the barber said I could soon have a curly crop, which will be boyish, becoming, and easy to keep in order. I'm satisfied, so please take the money and let's have supper."

deliciously - deliciosamente

barber - barbero, peluquero

crop - cultivo; cosecha

"Tell me all about it, Jo. I am not quite satisfied, but I can't blame you, for I know how willingly you sacrificed your vanity, as you call it, to your love. But, my dear, it was not necessary, and I'm afraid you will regret it one of these days," said Mrs. March.

willingly - de buena gana

sacrificed - sacrificado; sacrificar, sacrificio

"No, I won't!" returned Jo stoutly, feeling much relieved that her prank was not entirely condemned.

prank - travesura, broma, inocentada, jugarreta

condemned - condenado; condenar, clausurar

"What made you do it?" asked Amy, who would as soon have thought of cutting off her head as her pretty hair.

"Well, I was wild to do something for Father," replied Jo, as they gathered about the table, for healthy young people can eat even in the midst of trouble. "I hate to borrow as much as Mother does, and I knew Aunt March would croak, she always does, if you ask for a ninepence.

ninepence - Nueve peniques

Meg gave all her quarterly salary toward the rent, and I only got some clothes with mine, so I felt wicked, and was bound to have some money, if I sold the nose off my face to get it."

quarterly - trimestral, acuartelado, trimestralmente

"You needn't feel wicked, my child! You had no winter things and got the simplest with your own hard earnings," said Mrs. March with a look that warmed Jo's heart.

earnings - Ganando

"I hadn't the least idea of selling my hair at first, but as I went along I kept thinking what I could do, and feeling as if I'd like to dive into some of the rich stores and help myself. In a barber's window I saw tails of hair with the prices marked, and one black tail, not so thick as mine, was forty dollars. It came to me all of a sudden that I had one thing to make money out of, and without stopping to think, I walked in, asked if they bought hair, and what they would give for mine.

dive - bucear; zambullirse, tirarse de cabeza

"I don't see how you dared to do it," said Beth in a tone of awe.

awe - pavor, temor, medrosía, asombro, asombrar, abrumar

"Oh, he was a little man who looked as if he merely lived to oil his hair. He rather stared at first, as if he wasn't used to having girls bounce into his shop and ask him to buy their hair. He said he didn't care about mine, it wasn't the fashionable color, and he never paid much for it in the first place. The work put into it made it dear, and so on. It was getting late, and I was afraid if it wasn't done right away that I shouldn't have it done at all, and you know when I start to do a thing, I hate to give it up.

So I begged him to take it, and told him why I was in such a hurry. It was silly, I dare say, but it changed his mind, for I got rather excited, and told the story in my topsy-turvy way, and his wife heard, and said so kindly, ˜Take it, Thomas, and oblige the young lady. I'd do as much for our Jimmy any day if I had a spire of hair worth selling."

oblige - obligar

Jimmy - palanqueta

spire - giro; aguja

"Who was Jimmy?" asked Amy, who liked to have things explained as they went along.

"Her son, she said, who was in the army. How friendly such things make strangers feel, don't they? She talked away all the time the man clipped, and diverted my mind nicely."

clipped - cortado; cortar

diverted - desviado; desviar, entretener, distraer

"Didn't you feel dreadfully when the first cut came?" asked Meg, with a shiver.

first cut - primer corte

"I took a last look at my hair while the man got his things, and that was the end of it. I never snivel over trifles like that. I will confess, though, I felt queer when I saw the dear old hair laid out on the table, and felt only the short rough ends of my head.

snivel - gimoteo; lloriquear, gimotear, moco

It almost seemed as if I'd an arm or leg off. The woman saw me look at it, and picked out a long lock for me to keep. I'll give it to you, Marmee, just to remember past glories by, for a crop is so comfortable I don't think I shall ever have a mane again."

Mrs. March folded the wavy chestnut lock, and laid it away with a short gray one in her desk. She only said, "Thank you, deary," but something in her face made the girls change the subject, and talk as cheerfully as they could about Mr. Brooke's kindness, the prospect of a fine day tomorrow, and the happy times they would have when Father came home to be nursed.

wavy - Ondulado

deary - Carino

No one wanted to go to bed when at ten o'clock Mrs. March put by the last finished job, and said, "Come girls." Beth went to the piano and played the father's favorite hymn. All began bravely, but broke down one by one till Beth was left alone, singing with all her heart, for to her music was always a sweet consoler.

hymn - himno

"Go to bed and don't talk, for we must be up early and shall need all the sleep we can get. Good night, my darlings," said Mrs. March, as the hymn ended, for no one cared to try another.

darlings - queridos; querido, querida, amado, amada

They kissed her quietly, and went to bed as silently as if the dear invalid lay in the next room. Beth and Amy soon fell asleep in spite of the great trouble, but Meg lay awake, thinking the most serious thoughts she had ever known in her short life. Jo lay motionless, and her sister fancied that she was asleep, till a stifled sob made her exclaim, as she touched a wet cheek...

stifled - asfixiado; ahogar, sofocar

sob - sollozar; hdp

"Jo, dear, what is it? Are you crying about father?"

"No, not now."

"What then?"

"My... My hair!" burst out poor Jo, trying vainly to smother her emotion in the pillow.

vainly - en vano; vanamente

smother - asfixiar, ahogar

It did not seem at all comical to Meg, who kissed and caressed the afflicted heroine in the tenderest manner.

caressed - acariciado; caricia, carantona, acariciar

"I'm not sorry," protested Jo, with a choke. "I'd do it again tomorrow, if I could. It's only the vain part of me that goes and cries in this silly way. Don't tell anyone, It's all over now. I thought you were asleep, so I just made a little private moan for my one beauty. How came you to be awake?"

It's all over - Se acabó

moan - gimotear; gemido, quejido, quejar, gemir

"I can't sleep, I'm so anxious," said Meg.

"Think about something pleasant, and you'll soon drop off."

"I tried it, but felt wider awake than ever."

"What did you think of?"

"Handsome faces"eyes particularly," answered Meg, smiling to herself in the dark.

"What color do you like best?"

"Brown, that is, sometimes. Blue are lovely."

Jo laughed, and Meg sharply ordered her not to talk, then amiably promised to make her hair curl, and fell asleep to dream of living in her castle in the air.

amiably - amablemente

The clocks were striking midnight and the rooms were very still as a figure glided quietly from bed to bed, smoothing a coverlet here, settling a pillow there, and pausing to look long and tenderly at each unconscious face, to kiss each with lips that mutely blessed, and to pray the fervent prayers which only mothers utter. As she lifted the curtain to look out into the dreary night, the moon broke suddenly from behind the clouds and shone upon her like a bright, benignant face, which seemed to whisper in the silence, "Be comforted, dear soul! There is always light behind the clouds.

glided - se deslizó; deslizar, planear

coverlet - cobertor

settling - asentarse; sedimento, decantación

pausing - Pausa; (pause); receso, checkdescanso, pausar, interrumpir

blessed - bendecido; bendito; (bless) bendecido; bendito

fervent - fervoroso; ferviente

CHAPTER SIXTEEN. LETTERS

In the cold gray dawn the sisters lit their lamp and read their chapter with an earnestness never felt before.

earnestness - seriedad

For now the shadow of a real trouble had come, the little books were full of help and comfort, and as they dressed, they agreed to say goodbye cheerfully and hopefully, and send their mother on her anxious journey unsaddened by tears or complaints from them. Everything seemed very strange when they went down, so dim and still outside, so full of light and bustle within. Breakfast at that early hour seemed odd, and even Hannah's familiar face looked unnatural as she flew about her kitchen with her nightcap on. The big trunk stood ready in the hall, Mother's cloak and bonnet lay on the sofa, and Mother herself sat trying to eat, but looking so pale and worn with sleeplessness and anxiety that the girls found it very hard to keep their resolution. Meg's eyes kept filling in spite of herself, Jo was obliged to hide her face in the kitchen roller more than once, and the little girls wore a grave, troubled expression, as if sorrow was a new experience to them.

unsaddened - Sin pena

nightcap - gorra de dormir; gorro de dormir

sleeplessness - insomnio

roller - rodillo, carraca

Nobody talked much, but as the time drew very near and they sat waiting for the carriage, Mrs. March said to the girls, who were all busied about her, one folding her shawl, another smoothing out the strings of her bonnet, a third putting on her overshoes, and a fourth fastening up her travelling bag...

shawl - un chal; chal, panolón

travelling bag - una bolsa de viaje

"Children, I leave you to Hannah's care and Mr. Laurence's protection. Hannah is faithfulness itself, and our good neighbor will guard you as if you were his own. I have no fears for you, yet I am anxious that you should take this trouble rightly. Don't grieve and fret when I am gone, or think that you can be idle and comfort yourselves by being idle and trying to forget.

faithfulness - fidelidad, lealtad

rightly - verdad

grieve - duelo; afligirse, acongojarse

Go on with your work as usual, for work is a blessed solace. Hope and keep busy, and whatever happens, remember that you never can be fatherless."

solace - consuelo, solaz, solazar, consolar

"Yes, Mother."

"Meg, dear, be prudent, watch over your sisters, consult Hannah, and in any perplexity, go to Mr. Laurence. Be patient, Jo, don't get despondent or do rash things, write to me often, and be my brave girl, ready to help and cheer all. Beth, comfort yourself with your music, and be faithful to the little home duties, and you, Amy, help all you can, be obedient, and keep happy safe at home."

Prudent - prudente, atentado

consult - consultar

perplexity - perplejidad

obedient - obediente

"We will, Mother! We will!"

The rattle of an approaching carriage made them all start and listen. That was the hard minute, but the girls stood it well. No one cried, no one ran away or uttered a lamentation, though their hearts were very heavy as they sent loving messages to Father, remembering, as they spoke that it might be too late to deliver them.

rattle - sonajero; hacer sonar, hacer vibrar

lamentation - lamentación

They kissed their mother quietly, clung about her tenderly, and tried to wave their hands cheerfully when she drove away.

clung - aferrado; engancharse, adherirse

Laurie and his grandfather came over to see her off, and Mr. Brooke looked so strong and sensible and kind that the girls christened him ˜Mr. Greatheart'on the spot.

"Good-by, my darlings! God bless and keep us all!" whispered Mrs. March, as she kissed one dear little face after the other, and hurried into the carriage.

As she rolled away, the sun came out, and looking back, she saw it shining on the group at the gate like a good omen. They saw it also, and smiled and waved their hands, and the last thing she beheld as she turned the corner was the four bright faces, and behind them like a bodyguard, old Mr. Laurence, faithful Hannah, and devoted Laurie.

omen - presagio

bodyguard - escolta, guardaespaldas, espaldero

"How kind everyone is to us!" she said, turning to find fresh proof of it in the respectful sympathy of the young man's face.

Proof - pruebas; prueba

"I don't see how they can help it," returned Mr. Brooke, laughing so infectiously that Mrs. March could not help smiling. And so the journey began with the good omens of sunshine, smiles, and cheerful words.

infectiously - infecciosamente

"I feel as if there had been an earthquake," said Jo, as their neighbors went home to breakfast, leaving them to rest and refresh themselves.

"It seems as if half the house was gone," added Meg forlornly.

Beth opened her lips to say something, but could only point to the pile of nicely mended hose which lay on Mother's table, showing that even in her last hurried moments she had thought and worked for them. It was a little thing, but it went straight to their hearts, and in spite of their brave resolutions, they all broke down and cried bitterly.

hose - manguera, lavar con manguera

Hannah wisely allowed them to relieve their feelings, and when the shower showed signs of clearing up, she came to the rescue, armed with a coffeepot.

relieve - aliviar, relevar

clearing up - limpiar; despejar(se); aclarar

"Now, my dear young ladies, remember what your ma said, and don't fret. Come and have a cup of coffee all round, and then let's fall to work and be a credit to the family."

Coffee was a treat, and Hannah showed great tact in making it that morning. No one could resist her persuasive nods, or the fragrant invitation issuing from the nose of the coffee pot. They drew up to the table, exchanged their handkerchiefs for napkins, and in ten minutes were all right again.

resist - resistir, panish: t-needed

nods - asiente; asentir, cabecear, cabezada

napkins - servilletas; servilleta

"˜Hope and keep busy', that's the motto for us, so let's see who will remember it best. I shall go to Aunt March, as usual. Oh, won't she lecture though!" said Jo, as she sipped with returning spirit.

motto - mote, divisa, lema

sipped - bebido; sorbo, sorber

"I shall go to my Kings, though I'd much rather stay at home and attend to things here," said Meg, wishing she hadn't made her eyes so red.

"No need of that. Beth and I can keep house perfectly well," put in Amy, with an important air.

keep house - Mantener la casa

"Hannah will tell us what to do, and we'll have everything nice when you come home," added Beth, getting out her mop and dish tub without delay.

"I think anxiety is very interesting," observed Amy, eating sugar pensively.

The girls couldn't help laughing, and felt better for it, though Meg shook her head at the young lady who could find consolation in a sugar bowl.

sugar bowl - azucarero

The sight of the turnovers made Jo sober again; and when the two went out to their daily tasks, they looked sorrowfully back at the window where they were accustomed to see their mother's face. It was gone, but Beth had remembered the little household ceremony, and there she was, nodding away at them like a rosyfaced mandarin.

daily tasks - tareas diarias

rosyfaced - Rosa

Mandarin - mandarín, chino mandarín

"That's so like my Beth!" said Jo, waving her hat, with a grateful face. "Goodbye, Meggy, I hope the Kings won't strain today. Don't fret about Father, dear," she added, as they parted.

"And I hope Aunt March won't croak. Your hair is becoming, and it looks very boyish and nice," returned Meg, trying not to smile at the curly head, which looked comically small on her tall sister's shoulders.

comically - Cómicamente

"That's my only comfort." And, touching her hat a la Laurie, away went Jo, feeling like a shorn sheep on a wintry day.

News from their father comforted the girls very much, for though dangerously ill, the presence of the best and tenderest of nurses had already done him good. Mr. Brooke sent a bulletin every day, and as the head of the family, Meg insisted on reading the dispatches, which grew more cheerful as the week passed. At first, everyone was eager to write, and plump envelopes were carefully poked into the letter box by one or other of the sisters, who felt rather important with their Washington correspondence.

dangerously - peligrosamente

bulletin - boletín, boletín informativo, boletín de noticias

dispatches - despachos; despachar, privar, despacharse, despacho

more cheerful - más alegre

envelopes - sobres; sobre

letter box - Buzón

correspondence - correspondencia, carteo, noticias

As one of these packets contained characteristic notes from the party, we will rob an imaginary mail, and read them.

packets - paquetes; paquete

characteristic - característico, característica

rob - robar

My dearest Mother:

It is impossible to tell you how happy your last letter made us, for the news was so good we couldn't help laughing and crying over it. How very kind Mr. Brooke is, and how fortunate that Mr. Laurence's business detains him near you so long, since he is so useful to you and Father. The girls are all as good as gold. Jo helps me with the sewing, and insists on doing all sorts of hard jobs. I should be afraid she might overdo, if I didn't know her ˜moral fit'wouldn't last long. Beth is as regular about her tasks as a clock, and never forgets what you told her. She grieves about Father, and looks sober except when she is at her little piano. Amy minds me nicely, and I take great care of her. She does her own hair, and I am teaching her to make buttonholes and mend her stockings.

detains - etiene; panish: t-needed

insists - insiste; insistir

overdo - exagerar; pasarse, cocer demasiado

grieves - se aflige; afligirse, acongojarse

She tries very hard, and I know you will be pleased with her improvement when you come. Mr. Laurence watches over us like a motherly old hen, as Jo says, and Laurie is very kind and neighborly. He and Jo keep us merry, for we get pretty blue sometimes, and feel like orphans, with you so far away. Hannah is a perfect saint. She does not scold at all, and always calls me Miss Margaret, which is quite proper, you know, and treats me with respect. We are all well and busy, but we long, day and night, to have you back. Give my dearest love to Father, and believe me, ever your own...

hen - gallina

Orphans - huérfanos; huérfano, huérfana

MEG

This note, prettily written on scented paper, was a great contrast to the next, which was scribbled on a big sheet of thin foreign paper, ornamented with blots and all manner of flourishes and curly-tailed letters.

ornamented - ornamentado; ornamento, ornamento musical

blots - manchas; mancha, desdoro, emborronar, manchar

flourishes - florecer, prosperar, ademanes, floritura, floreo, ornamento

My precious Marmee:

Three cheers for dear Father! Brooke was a trump to telegraph right off, and let us know the minute he was better. I rushed up garret when the letter came, and tried to thank God for being so good to us, but I could only cry, and say, "I'm glad! I'm glad!" Didn't that do as well as a regular prayer? For I felt a great many in my heart. We have such funny times, and now I can enjoy them, for everyone is so desperately good, it's like living in a nest of turtledoves. You'd laugh to see Meg head the table and try to be motherish. She gets prettier every day, and I'm in love with her sometimes. The children are regular archangels, and I"well, I'm Jo, and never shall be anything else. Oh, I must tell you that I came near having a quarrel with Laurie. I freed my mind about a silly little thing, and he was offended.

nest - nido

turtledoves - Tortuga

motherish - maternidad

archangels - arcángeles; arcángel

I was right, but didn't speak as I ought, and he marched home, saying he wouldn't come again till I begged pardon. I declared I wouldn't and got mad. It lasted all day. I felt bad and wanted you very much. Laurie and I are both so proud, it's hard to beg pardon. But I thought he'd come to it, for I was in the right. He didn't come, and just at night I remembered what you said when Amy fell into the river. I read my little book, felt better, resolved not to let the sun set on my anger, and ran over to tell Laurie I was sorry. I met him at the gate, coming for the same thing. We both laughed, begged each other's pardon, and felt all good and comfortable again.

I made a ˜pome'yesterday, when I was helping Hannah wash, and as Father likes my silly little things, I put it in to amuse him. Give him my lovingest hug that ever was, and kiss yourself a dozen times for your...

pome - pomo

lovingest - el más carinoso

TOPSY-TURVY JO

A SONG FROM THE SUDS

suds - espuma; (sud); espuma

Queen of my tub, I merrily sing,

While the white foam rises high,

foam - espuma, espumar

And sturdily wash and rinse and wring,

sturdily - Robinariamente

rinse - enjuagar, aclarar

wring - escurrir; torcer, retorcer

And fasten the clothes to dry.

Then out in the free fresh air they swing,

Under the sunny sky.

I wish we could wash from our hearts and souls

The stains of the week away,

stains - manchas; mancha, lamparón, tacha, mancilla, colorante

And let water and air by their magic make

Ourselves as pure as they.

pure - pura; puro

Then on the earth there would be indeed,

A glorious washing day!

Along the path of a useful life,

Will heart's-ease ever bloom.

bloom - florecer; flor

The busy mind has no time to think

Of sorrow or care or gloom.

And anxious thoughts may be swept away,

As we bravely wield a broom.

wield - sgrimir; manejar, manipular, blandir, empunar, ejercer, regir

I am glad a task to me is given,

To labor at day by day,

For it brings me health and strength and hope,

And I cheerfully learn to say,

"Head, you may think, Heart, you may feel,

But, Hand, you shall work alway!"

alway - Siempre

Dear Mother,

There is only room for me to send my love, and some pressed pansies from the root I have been keeping safe in the house for Father to see. I read every morning, try to be good all day, and sing myself to sleep with Father's tune. I can't sing ˜LAND OF THE LEAL'now, it makes me cry.

root - raíz

Everyone is very kind, and we are as happy as we can be without you. Amy wants the rest of the page, so I must stop. I didn't forget to cover the holders, and I wind the clock and air the rooms every day.

holders - tenedores; soporte, tenedor, titular, poseedor

Kiss dear Father on the cheek he calls mine. Oh, do come soon to your loving...

LITTLE BETH

Ma Chere Mamma,

We are all well I do my lessons always and never corroberate the girls"Meg says I mean contradick so I put in both words and you can take the properest. Meg is a great comfort to me and lets me have jelly every night at tea its so good for me Jo says because it keeps me sweet tempered. Laurie is not as respeckful as he ought to be now I am almost in my teens, he calls me Chick and hurts my feelings by talking French to me very fast when I say Merci or Bon jour as Hattie King does. The sleeves of my blue dress were all worn out, and Meg put in new ones, but the full front came wrong and they are more blue than the dress. I felt bad but did not fret I bear my troubles well but I do wish Hannah would put more starch in my aprons and have buckwheats every day.

corroberate - Corroberar

contradick - Contradecir

jelly - jalea; gelatina

respeckful - Respetuoso

chick - chica; pollito

jour - our

sleeves - mangas; manga, funda, enfundar

Can't she? didn't I make that interrigation point nice? Meg says my punchtuation and spelling are disgraceful and I am mortyfied but dear me I have so many things to do, I can't stop. Adieu, I send heaps of love to Papa. Your affectionate daughter...

didn't I - ?no es así?

interrigation - irrigación

punchtuation - puntuación

disgraceful - vergonzoso, deshonroso, escandaloso, ignominioso

adieu - adiós

AMY CURTIS MARCH

Dear Mis March,

I jes drop a line to say we git on fust rate. The girls is clever and fly round right smart. Miss Meg is going to make a proper good housekeeper. She hes the liking for it, and gits the hang of things surprisin quick. Jo doos beat all for goin ahead, but she don't stop to cal'k'late fust, and you never know where she's like to bring up. She done out a tub of clothes on Monday, but she starched 'em afore they was wrenched, and blued a pink calico dress till I thought I should a died a laughin. Beth is the best of little creeters, and a sight of help to me, bein so forehanded and dependable. She tries to learn everything, and really goes to market beyond her years, likewise keeps accounts, with my help, quite wonderful. We have got on very economical so fur.

fust - Primero

housekeeper - ama de llaves, ama de casa

surprisin - sorprendente

goin - Te vas

wrenched - desgarrado; arrancar

calico - calicó, gato calicó

laughin - Reír

forehanded - con las manos en la masa

dependable - seguro; fiable

I don't let the girls hev coffee only once a week, accordin to your wish, and keep em on plain wholesome vittles. Amy does well without frettin, wearin her best clothes and eatin sweet stuff. Mr. Laurie is as full of didoes as usual, and turns the house upside down frequent, but he heartens the girls, so I let em hev full swing. The old gentleman sends heaps of things, and is rather wearin, but means wal, and it aint my place to say nothin. My bread is riz, so no more at this time. I send my duty to Mr. March, and hope he's seen the last of his Pewmonia.

accordin - de acuerdo

wearin - usando

eatin - Comiendo

heartens - alienta; alentar, animar

aint - no

nothin - Nada

Yours respectful,

Hannah Mullet

mullet - mulllet; salmonete

head nurse of Ward No. 2,

head nurse - enfermera jefe

ward - pabellón; sala

All serene on the Rappahannock, troops in fine condition, commisary department well conducted, the Home Guard under Colonel Teddy always on duty, Commander in Chief General Laurence reviews the army daily, Quartermaster Mullet keeps order in camp, and Major Lion does picket duty at night. A salute of twenty-four guns was fired on receipt of good news from Washington, and a dress parade took place at headquarters.

serene - sereno

commisary - Comisario

picket - piquete

salute - saludar; saludo, venia

headquarters - Cuartel general

Commander in chief sends best wishes, in which he is heartily joined by...

COLONEL TEDDY

Dear Madam:

The little girls are all well. Beth and my boy report daily. Hannah is a model servant, and guards pretty Meg like a dragon. Glad the fine weather holds. Pray make Brooke useful, and draw on me for funds if expenses exceed your estimate. Don't let your husband want anything. Thank God he is mending.

Dragon - dragón

funds - fondos; fondo, capital, financiar, sufragar, patrocinar

exceed - sobrepasar, pasarse, exceder

estimate - presupuesto, estimación, estimar

Your sincere friend and servant, JAMES LAURENCE

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN. LITTLE FAITHFUL

For a week the amount of virtue in the old house would have supplied the neighborhood.

It was really amazing, for everyone seemed in a heavenly frame of mind, and self-denial was all the fashion. Relieved of their first anxiety about their father, the girls insensibly relaxed their praiseworthy efforts a little, and began to fall back into old ways. They did not forget their motto, but hoping and keeping busy seemed to grow easier, and after such tremendous exertions, they felt that Endeavor deserved a holiday, and gave it a good many.

denial - mentira, negación, negativa

praiseworthy - encomiable, alabable, digno de alabanza, loable

endeavor - tentativa, esfuerzo, empeno, empresa

Jo caught a bad cold through neglect to cover the shorn head enough, and was ordered to stay at home till she was better, for Aunt March didn't like to hear people read with colds in their heads. Jo liked this, and after an energetic rummage from garret to cellar, subsided on the sofa to nurse her cold with arsenicum and books. Amy found that housework and art did not go well together, and returned to her mud pies.

energetic - enérgico, energético

arsenicum - Arsénico

housework - tareas domésticas

Meg went daily to her pupils, and sewed, or thought she did, at home, but much time was spent in writing long letters to her mother, or reading the Washington dispatches over and over. Beth kept on, with only slight relapses into idleness or grieving.

relapses - recaídas; reincidir, recaer, recaída, recidiva, reincidencia

idleness - ociosidad; inactividad, holganza, indolencia

grieving - duelo; afligirse, acongojarse

All the little duties were faithfully done each day, and many of her sisters'also, for they were forgetful, and the house seemed like a clock whose pendulum was gone a-visiting. When her heart got heavy with longings for Mother or fears for Father, she went away into a certain closet, hid her face in the folds of a dear old gown, and made her little moan and prayed her little prayer quietly by herself.

forgetful - olvidadizo, desmemoriado

pendulum - péndulo

longings - Anhelo

Nobody knew what cheered her up after a sober fit, but everyone felt how sweet and helpful Beth was, and fell into a way of going to her for comfort or advice in their small affairs.

All were unconscious that this experience was a test of character, and when the first excitement was over, felt that they had done well and deserved praise. So they did, but their mistake was in ceasing to do well, and they learned this lesson through much anxiety and regret.

ceasing - Cesar; (cease); cesar, parar, terminar

"Meg, I wish you'd go and see the Hummels. You know Mother told us not to forget them." said Beth, ten days after Mrs. March's departure.

"I'm too tired to go this afternoon," replied Meg, rocking comfortably as she sewed.

"Can't you, Jo?" asked Beth.

"Too stormy for me with my cold."

"I thought it was almost well."

"It's well enough for me to go out with Laurie, but not well enough to go to the Hummels'," said Jo, laughing, but looking a little ashamed of her inconsistency.

inconsistency - incoherencia; inconsistencia

"Why don't you go yourself?" asked Meg.

"I have been every day, but the baby is sick, and I don't know what to do for it. Mrs. Hummel goes away to work, and Lottchen takes care of it. But it gets sicker and sicker, and I think you or Hannah ought to go."

Beth spoke earnestly, and Meg promised she would go tomorrow.

"Ask Hannah for some nice little mess, and take it round, Beth, the air will do you good," said Jo, adding apologetically, "I'd go but I want to finish my writing."

apologetically - pidiendo disculpas; disculpándose

"My head aches and I'm tired, so I thought maybe some of you would go," said Beth.

"Amy will be in presently, and she will run down for us," suggested Meg.

So Beth lay down on the sofa, the others returned to their work, and the Hummels were forgotten. An hour passed. Amy did not come, Meg went to her room to try on a new dress, Jo was absorbed in her story, and Hannah was sound asleep before the kitchen fire, when Beth quietly put on her hood, filled her basket with odds and ends for the poor children, and went out into the chilly air with a heavy head and a grieved look in her patient eyes.

It was late when she came back, and no one saw her creep upstairs and shut herself into her mother's room. Half an hour after, Jo went to ˜Mother's closet'for something, and there found little Beth sitting on the medicine chest, looking very grave, with red eyes and a camphor bottle in her hand.

creep - se arrastran; reptar, hormigueo, fatiga

medicine chest - botiquín

camphor - alcanfor

"Christopher Columbus! What's the matter?" cried Jo, as Beth put out her hand as if to warn her off, and asked quickly. . .

"You've had the scarlet fever, haven't you?"

scarlet fever - escarlatina

"Years ago, when Meg did. Why?"

"Then I'll tell you. Oh, Jo, the baby's dead!"

"What baby?"

"Mrs. Hummel's. It died in my lap before she got home," cried Beth with a sob.

"My poor dear, how dreadful for you! I ought to have gone," said Jo, taking her sister in her arms as she sat down in her mother's big chair, with a remorseful face.

"It wasn't dreadful, Jo, only so sad! I saw in a minute it was sicker, but Lottchen said her mother had gone for a doctor, so I took Baby and let Lotty rest. It seemed asleep, but all of a sudden if gave a little cry and trembled, and then lay very still. I tried to warm its feet, and Lotty gave it some milk, but it didn't stir, and I knew it was dead."

"Don't cry, dear! What did you do?"

"I just sat and held it softly till Mrs. Hummel came with the doctor. He said it was dead, and looked at Heinrich and Minna, who have sore throats. ˜Scarlet fever, ma'am. Ought to have called me before,'he said crossly. Mrs. Hummel told him she was poor, and had tried to cure baby herself, but now it was too late, and she could only ask him to help the others and trust to charity for his pay. He smiled then, and was kinder, but it was very sad, and I cried with them till he turned round all of a sudden, and told me to go home and take belladonna right away, or I'd have the fever.

fever - fiebre, calentura

"No, you won't!" cried Jo, hugging her close, with a frightened look. "Oh, Beth, if you should be sick I never could forgive myself! What shall we do?"

"Don't be frightened, I guess I shan't have it badly. I looked in Mother's book, and saw that it begins with headache, sore throat, and queer feelings like mine, so I did take some belladonna, and I feel better," said Beth, laying her cold hands on her hot forehead and trying to look well.

be frightened - estar asustado

"If Mother was only at home!" exclaimed Jo, seizing the book, and feeling that Washington was an immense way off. She read a page, looked at Beth, felt her head, peeped into her throat, and then said gravely, "You've been over the baby every day for more than a week, and among the others who are going to have it, so I'm afraid you are going to have it, Beth. I'll call Hannah, she knows all about sickness."

seizing - incautando; (seize); agarrar, apoderarse de, apresar, aferrar

sickness - enfermedad, dolencia

"Don't let Amy come. She never had it, and I should hate to give it to her. Can't you and Meg have it over again?" asked Beth, anxiously.

"I guess not. Don't care if I do. Serve me right, selfish pig, to let you go, and stay writing rubbish myself!" muttered Jo, as she went to consult Hannah.

The good soul was wide awake in a minute, and took the lead at once, assuring that there was no need to worry; every one had scarlet fever, and if rightly treated, nobody died, all of which Jo believed, and felt much relieved as they went up to call Meg.

good soul - alma buena

assuring - aseguro; asegurar

"Now I'll tell you what we'll do," said Hannah, when she had examined and questioned Beth, "we will have Dr. Bangs, just to take a look at you, dear, and see that we start right. Then we'll send Amy off to Aunt March's for a spell, to keep her out of harm's way, and one of you girls can stay at home and amuse Beth for a day or two."

bangs - bangs; portazo, golpe estrepitoso

"I shall stay, of course, I'm oldest," began Meg, looking anxious and self-reproachful.

"I shall, because It's my fault she is sick. I told Mother I'd do the errands, and I haven't," said Jo decidedly.

It's my fault - Es mi culpa

"Which will you have, Beth? There ain't no need of but one," aid Hannah.

"Jo, please." And Beth leaned her head against her sister with a contented look, which effectually settled that point.

effectually - eficazmente

"I'll go and tell Amy," said Meg, feeling a little hurt, yet rather relieved on the whole, for she did not like nursing, and Jo did.

Amy rebelled outright, and passionately declared that she had rather have the fever than go to Aunt March. Meg reasoned, pleaded, and commanded, all in vain. Amy protested that she would not go, and Meg left her in despair to ask Hannah what should be done. Before she came back, Laurie walked into the parlor to find Amy sobbing, with her head in the sofa cushions. She told her story, expecting to be consoled, but Laurie only put his hands in his pockets and walked about the room, whistling softly, as he knit his brows in deep thought.

commanded - mandado; orden, mandato, mando, comando, dominio

cushions - cojines; cojín, almohadón, colchón, amortiguante, banda

consoled - consolado; consolar

whistling - Silbando; (whistle); silbato, pito, chifle, pitido

Presently he sat down beside her, and said, in his most wheedlesome tone, "Now be a sensible little woman, and do as they say. No, don't cry, but hear what a jolly plan I've got. You go to Aunt March's, and I'll come and take you out every day, driving or walking, and we'll have capital times. Won't that be better than moping here?"

wheedlesome - Hablas en serio

moping - deprimido; chascona, fregar

"I don't wish to be sent off as if I was in the way," began Amy, in an injured voice.

"Bless your heart, child, it's to keep you well. You don't want to be sick, do you?"

"No, I'm sure I don't, but I dare say I shall be, for I've been with Beth all the time."

"That's the very reason you ought to go away at once, so that you may escape it. Change of air and care will keep you well, I dare say, or if it does not entirely, you will have the fever more lightly. I advise you to be off as soon as you can, for scarlet fever is no joke, miss."

lightly - a la ligera; ligeramente

"But it's dull at Aunt March's, and she is so cross," said Amy, looking rather frightened.

"It won't be dull with me popping in every day to tell you how Beth is, and take you out gallivanting. The old lady likes me, and I'll be as sweet as possible to her, so she won't peck at us, whatever we do."

gallivanting - galanteando; paseo

"Will you take me out in the trotting wagon with Puck?"

wagon - vagón; carro, coche

"On my honor as a gentleman."

"And come every single day?"

"See if I don't!"

"And bring me back the minute Beth is well?"

"The identical minute."

identical - idénticos; idéntico

"And go to the theater, truly?"

"A dozen theaters, if we may."

"Well"I guess I will," said Amy slowly.

"Good girl! Call Meg, and tell her you'll give in," said Laurie, with an approving pat, which annoyed Amy more than the ˜giving in'.

Meg and Jo came running down to behold the miracle which had been wrought, and Amy, feeling very precious and self-sacrificing, promised to go, if the doctor said Beth was going to be ill.

sacrificing - sacrificando; sacrificar, sacrificio

"How is the little dear?" asked Laurie, for Beth was his especial pet, and he felt more anxious about her than he liked to show.

"She is lying down on Mother's bed, and feels better. The baby's death troubled her, but I dare say she has only got cold. Hannah says she thinks so, but she looks worried, and that makes me fidgety," answered Meg.

"What a trying world it is!" said Jo, rumpling up her hair in a fretful way. "No sooner do we get out of one trouble than down comes another. There doesn't seem to be anything to hold on to when Mother's gone, so I'm all at sea."

"Well, don't make a porcupine of yourself, it isn't becoming. Settle your wig, Jo, and tell me if I shall telegraph to your mother, or do anything?" asked Laurie, who never had been reconciled to the loss of his friend's one beauty.

porcupine - puercoespín

"That is what troubles me," said Meg. "I think we ought to tell her if Beth is really ill, but Hannah says we mustn't, for Mother can't leave Father, and it will only make them anxious. Beth won't be sick long, and Hannah knows just what to do, and Mother said we were to mind her, so I suppose we must, but it doesn't seem quite right to me."

"Hum, well, I can't say. Suppose you ask Grandfather after the doctor has been."

Hum - tararear, canturrear

"We will. Jo, go and get Dr. Bangs at once," commanded Meg. "We can't decide anything till he has been."

"Stay where you are, Jo. I'm errand boy to this establishment," said Laurie, taking up his cap.

"I'm afraid you are busy," began Meg.

"No, I've done my lessons for the day."

"Do you study in vacation time?" asked Jo.

"I follow the good example my neighbors set me," was Laurie's answer, as he swung himself out of the room.

"I have great hopes for my boy," observed Jo, watching him fly over the fence with an approving smile.

fly over - volar sobre

"He does very well, for a boy," was Meg's somewhat ungracious answer, for the subject did not interest her.

ungracious - ingrato; descortés, grosero, poco amable

Dr. Bangs came, said Beth had symptoms of the fever, but he thought she would have it lightly, though he looked sober over the Hummel story. Amy was ordered off at once, and provided with something to ward off danger, she departed in great state, with Jo and Laurie as escort.

Aunt March received them with her usual hospitality.

hospitality - hospitalidad, hostelería

"What do you want now?" she asked, looking sharply over her spectacles, while the parrot, sitting on the back of her chair, called out...

"Go away. No boys allowed here."

Laurie retired to the window, and Jo told her story.

"No more than I expected, if you are allowed to go poking about among poor folks. Amy can stay and make herself useful if she isn't sick, which I've no doubt she will be, looks like it now. Don't cry, child, it worries me to hear people sniff."

Amy was on the point of crying, but Laurie slyly pulled the parrot's tail, which caused Polly to utter an astonished croak and call out, "Bless my boots!" in such a funny way, that she laughed instead.

"What do you hear from your mother?" asked the old lady gruffly.

"Father is much better," replied Jo, trying to keep sober.

"Oh, is he? Well, that won't last long, I fancy. March never had any stamina," was the cheerful reply.

stamina - estamina, resistencia, aguante

"Ha, ha! Never say die, take a pinch of snuff, goodbye, goodbye!" squalled Polly, dancing on her perch, and clawing at the old lady's cap as Laurie tweaked him in the rear.

ha - Ja

snuff - tabaco; rapé

squalled - chilló; tormenta, borrasca

clawing - garra

rear - atrás; parte trasera

"Hold your tongue, you disrespectful old bird! And, Jo, you'd better go at once. It isn't proper to be gadding about so late with a rattlepated boy like..."

disrespectful - irrespetuoso

gadding about - deambular, callejear

"Hold your tongue, you disrespectful old bird!" cried Polly, tumbling off the chair with a bounce, and running to peck the ˜rattlepated'boy, who was shaking with laughter at the last speech.

"I don't think I can bear it, but I'll try," thought Amy, as she was left alone with Aunt March.

"Get along, you fright!" screamed Polly, and at that rude speech Amy could not restrain a sniff.

restrain - retener; refrenar(se), contenerse

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN. DARK DAYS

Beth did have the fever, and was much sicker than anyone but Hannah and the doctor suspected. The girls knew nothing about illness, and Mr. Laurence was not allowed to see her, so Hannah had everything her own way, and busy Dr. Bangs did his best, but left a good deal to the excellent nurse. Meg stayed at home, lest she should infect the Kings, and kept house, feeling very anxious and a little guilty when she wrote letters in which no mention was made of Beth's illness.

infect - infectar, contagiar, alborotar

kept house - mantener la casa

She could not think it right to deceive her mother, but she had been bidden to mind Hannah, and Hannah wouldn't hear of ˜Mrs. March bein'told, and worried just for sech a trifle.'

sech - ech

Jo devoted herself to Beth day and night, not a hard task, for Beth was very patient, and bore her pain uncomplainingly as long as she could control herself. But there came a time when during the fever fits she began to talk in a hoarse, broken voice, to play on the coverlet as if on her beloved little piano, and try to sing with a throat so swollen that there was no music left, a time when she did not know the familiar faces around her, but addressed them by wrong names, and called imploringly for her mother.

uncomplainingly - Incomplacientemente

hoarse - ronco

Then Jo grew frightened, Meg begged to be allowed to write the truth, and even Hannah said she ˜would think of it, though there was no danger yet'. A letter from Washington added to their trouble, for Mr. March had had a relapse, and could not think of coming home for a long while.

relapse - una recaída; reincidir, recaer, recaída, recidiva, reincidencia

How dark the days seemed now, how sad and lonely the house, and how heavy were the hearts of the sisters as they worked and waited, while the shadow of death hovered over the once happy home. Then it was that Margaret, sitting alone with tears dropping often on her work, felt how rich she had been in things more precious than any luxuries money could buy"in love, protection, peace, and health, the real blessings of life. Then it was that Jo, living in the darkened room, with that suffering little sister always before her eyes and that pathetic voice sounding in her ears, learned to see the beauty and the sweetness of Beth's nature, to feel how deep and tender a place she filled in all hearts, and to acknowledge the worth of Beth's unselfish ambition to live for others, and make home happy by that exercise of those simple virtues which all may possess, and which all should love and value more than talent, wealth, or beauty.

hovered - revoloteó; cerner, dudar, hesitar, vacilar

sweetness - dulzura, dulzor, melosidad, dulcedumbre, agradabilidad

acknowledge - reconocer, acusar recibo

unselfish - altruista, desprendido, generoso

And Amy, in her exile, longed eagerly to be at home, that she might work for Beth, feeling now that no service would be hard or irksome, and remembering, with regretful grief, how many neglected tasks those willing hands had done for her. Laurie haunted the house like a restless ghost, and Mr. Laurence locked the grand piano, because he could not bear to be reminded of the young neighbor who used to make the twilight pleasant for him. Everyone missed Beth. The milkman, baker, grocer, and butcher inquired how she did, poor Mrs. Hummel came to beg pardon for her thoughtlessness and to get a shroud for Minna, the neighbors sent all sorts of comforts and good wishes, and even those who knew her best were surprised to find how many friends shy little Beth had made.

exile - exilio, destierro, exiliado, desterrado, exiliar, desterrar

milkman - lechero

Baker - panadero, panadera

grocer - almacén; abacero, abacera, abarrotero

good wishes - buenos deseos

Meanwhile she lay on her bed with old Joanna at her side, for even in her wanderings she did not forget her forlorn protege. She longed for her cats, but would not have them brought, lest they should get sick, and in her quiet hours she was full of anxiety about Jo. She sent loving messages to Amy, bade them tell her mother that she would write soon, and often begged for pencil and paper to try to say a word, that Father might not think she had neglected him.

wanderings - vagabundeos; errabundo, andariego, errante, peripatético, vagar

protege - protegido

But soon even these intervals of consciousness ended, and she lay hour after hour, tossing to and fro, with incoherent words on her lips, or sank into a heavy sleep which brought her no refreshment. Dr. Bangs came twice a day, Hannah sat up at night, Meg kept a telegram in her desk all ready to send off at any minute, and Jo never stirred from Beth's side.

intervals - intervalos; intervalo

incoherent - incoherente, inconexo, deshilvanado, descosido

send off - enviar, despachar

The first of December was a wintry day indeed to them, for a bitter wind blew, snow fell fast, and the year seemed getting ready for its death. When Dr. Bangs came that morning, he looked long at Beth, held the hot hand in both his own for a minute, and laid it gently down, saying, in a low voice to Hannah, "If Mrs. March can leave her husband she'd better be sent for."

Hannah nodded without speaking, for her lips twitched nervously, Meg dropped down into a chair as the strength seemed to go out of her limbs at the sound of those words, and Jo, standing with a pale face for a minute, ran to the parlor, snatched up the telegram, and throwing on her things, rushed out into the storm. She was soon back, and while noiselessly taking off her cloak, Laurie came in with a letter, saying that Mr.

twitched - se movió; crispar(se), mover(se) convulsivamente

snatched up - agarrar, tomar

March was mending again. Jo read it thankfully, but the heavy weight did not seem lifted off her heart, and her face was so full of misery that Laurie asked quickly, "What is it? Is Beth worse?"

heavy weight - peso pesado

misery - miseria, sinvivir, desgracia, desdicha, infortunio

"I've sent for Mother," said Jo, tugging at her rubber boots with a tragic expression.

"Good for you, Jo! Did you do it on your own responsibility?" asked Laurie, as he seated her in the hall chair and took off the rebellious boots, seeing how her hands shook.

"No. The doctor told us to."

"Oh, Jo, it's not so bad as that?" cried Laurie, with a startled face.

"Yes, it is. She doesn't know us, she doesn't even talk about the flocks of green doves, as she calls the vine leaves on the wall. She doesn't look like my Beth, and there's nobody to help us bear it. Mother and father both gone, and God seems so far away I can't find Him."

flocks - ebanos; rebano, bandada

doves - palomas; paloma

As the tears streamed fast down poor Jo's cheeks, she stretched out her hand in a helpless sort of way, as if groping in the dark, and Laurie took it in his, whispering as well as he could with a lump in his throat, "I'm here. Hold on to me, Jo, dear!"

streamed - en streaming; corriente, flujo, arroyo, fluir, recibir flujo

groping - palpar, tantear, buscar a tientas, manosear, meter mano

lump - un bulto; bulto, grumo, chichón, cúmulo, agrupación

She could not speak, but she did ˜hold on', and the warm grasp of the friendly human hand comforted her sore heart, and seemed to lead her nearer to the Divine arm which alone could uphold her in her trouble.

grasp - agarrar, asir, comprender, asimiento, comprensión, alcance

divine - divino

uphold - elevar, levantar, sustentar, sostener, mantener

Laurie longed to say something tender and comfortable, but no fitting words came to him, so he stood silent, gently stroking her bent head as her mother used to do. It was the best thing he could have done, far more soothing than the most eloquent words, for Jo felt the unspoken sympathy, and in the silence learned the sweet solace which affection administers to sorrow.

most eloquent - el más elocuente

unspoken - Deshablar

administers - administrar

Soon she dried the tears which had relieved her, and looked up with a grateful face.

"Thank you, Teddy, I'm better now. I don't feel so forlorn, and will try to bear it if it comes."

"Keep hoping for the best, that will help you, Jo. Soon your mother will be here, and then everything will be all right."

"I'm so glad Father is better. Now she won't feel so bad about leaving him. Oh, me! It does seem as if all the troubles came in a heap, and I got the heaviest part on my shoulders," sighed Jo, spreading her wet handkerchief over her knees to dry.

"Doesn't Meg pull fair?" asked Laurie, looking indignant.

"Oh, yes, she tries to, but she can't love Bethy as I do, and she won't miss her as I shall. Beth is my conscience, and I can't give her up. I can't! I can't!"

Down went Jo's face into the wet handkerchief, and she cried despairingly, for she had kept up bravely till now and never shed a tear. Laurie drew his hand across his eyes, but could not speak till he had subdued the choky feeling in his throat and steadied his lips.

despairingly - desesperadamente

subdued - sumiso; someter, doblegar, domenar, debelar

steadied - fijado; firme, liso, fijo

It might be unmanly, but he couldn't help it, and I am glad of it. Presently, as Jo's sobs quieted, he said hopefully, "I don't think she will die. She's so good, and we all love her so much, I don't believe God will take her away yet."

sobs - sollozos; hdp

"The good and dear people always do die," groaned Jo, but she stopped crying, for her friend's words cheered her up in spite of her own doubts and fears.

"Poor girl, you're worn out. It isn't like you to be forlorn. Stop a bit. I'll hearten you up in a jiffy."

hearten - corazón; alentar, animar

Laurie went off two stairs at a time, and Jo laid her wearied head down on Beth's little brown hood, which no one had thought of moving from the table where she left it. It must have possessed some magic, for the submissive spirit of its gentle owner seemed to enter into Jo, and when Laurie came running down with a glass of wine, she took it with a smile, and said bravely, "I drink" Health to my Beth!

wearied - cansado, cansino, cansar

You are a good doctor, Teddy, and such a comfortable friend. How can I ever pay you?" she added, as the wine refreshed her body, as the kind words had done her troubled mind.

refreshed - refrescado; refrescar

"I'll send my bill, by-and-by, and tonight I'll give you something that will warm the cockles of your heart better than quarts of wine," said Laurie, beaming at her with a face of suppressed satisfaction at something.

cockles - berberechos; Berberecho

"What is it?" cried Jo, forgetting her woes for a minute in her wonder.

woes - problemas; pena, infortunio, ay

"I telegraphed to your mother yesterday, and Brooke answered she'd come at once, and she'll be here tonight, and everything will be all right. Aren't you glad I did it?"

Laurie, though decidedly amazed, behaved with great presence of mind. He patted her back soothingly, and finding that she was recovering, followed it up by a bashful kiss or two, which brought Jo round at once. Holding on to the banisters, she put him gently away, saying breathlessly, "Oh, don't! I didn't mean to, it was dreadful of me, but you were such a dear to go and do it in spite of Hannah that I couldn't help flying at you.

patted - palmaditas; palmadita, caricia

recovering - recuperándose; recuperarse

Tell me all about it, and don't give me wine again, it makes me act so."

"I don't mind," laughed Laurie, as he settled his tie. "Why, you see I got fidgety, and so did Grandpa. We thought Hannah was overdoing the authority business, and your mother ought to know. She'd never forgive us if Beth... Well, if anything happened, you know. So I got grandpa to say it was high time we did something, and off I pelted to the office yesterday, for the doctor looked sober, and Hannah most took my head off when I proposed a telegram.

overdoing - exagerar; pasarse, cocer demasiado

pelted - pelado; tirar, lanzar

I never can bear to be ˜lorded over', so that settled my mind, and I did it. Your mother will come, I know, and the late train is in at two A.M. I shall go for her, and you've only got to bottle up your rapture, and keep Beth quiet till that blessed lady gets here."

lorded - senorado; castellano, senor

"Laurie, you're an angel! How shall I ever thank you?"

"Fly at me again. I rather liked it," said Laurie, looking mischievous, a thing he had not done for a fortnight.

"No, thank you. I'll do it by proxy, when your grandpa comes. Don't tease, but go home and rest, for you'll be up half the night. Bless you, Teddy, bless you!"

I'll do it - Lo haré

by proxy - Por medio de un representante

Jo had backed into a corner, and as she finished her speech, she vanished precipitately into the kitchen, where she sat down upon a dresser and told the assembled cats that she was "happy, oh, so happy!" while Laurie departed, feeling that he had made a rather neat thing of it.

"That's the interferingest chap I ever see, but I forgive him and do hope Mrs. March is coming right away," said Hannah, with an air of relief, when Jo told the good news.

interferingest - Interfiriendo

chap - chico; tío, tipo

Meg had a quiet rapture, and then brooded over the letter, while Jo set the sickroom in order, and Hannah "knocked up a couple of pies in case of company unexpected". A breath of fresh air seemed to blow through the house, and something better than sunshine brightened the quiet rooms. Everything appeared to feel the hopeful change. Beth's bird began to chirp again, and a half-blown rose was discovered on Amy's bush in the window. The fires seemed to burn with unusual cheeriness, and every time the girls met, their pale faces broke into smiles as they hugged one another, whispering encouragingly, "Mother's coming, dear! Mother's coming!" Every one rejoiced but Beth. She lay in that heavy stupor, alike unconscious of hope and joy, doubt and danger. It was a piteous sight, the once rosy face so changed and vacant, the once busy hands so weak and wasted, the once smiling lips quite dumb, and the once pretty, well-kept hair scattered rough and tangled on the pillow. All day she lay so, only rousing now and then to mutter, "Water!

brooded - refrescado; cría, polluelo, prole, empollar, proteger

knocked up - embarazada

cheeriness - alegría

encouragingly - alentadoramente

rejoiced - se alegró; alegrarse, regocijarse

stupor - estupor

piteous - lamentable

vacant - vacío; vacante

tangled - enredado; desorden, marana, enredo

rousing - conmovedor; despertar

mutter - hablar entre dientes, murmurar; (mut) hablar entre dientes

with lips so parched they could hardly shape the word. All day Jo and Meg hovered over her, watching, waiting, hoping, and trusting in God and Mother, and all day the snow fell, the bitter wind raged, and the hours dragged slowly by. But night came at last, and every time the clock struck, the sisters, still sitting on either side of the bed, looked at each other with brightening eyes, for each hour brought help nearer. The doctor had been in to say that some change, for better or worse, would probably take place about midnight, at which time he would return.

parched - eseca; torrefacer, agostar

trusting - confiado; confianza, crédito, fiar, consorcio, trust

raged - enfurecido; rabia, furor

Hannah, quite worn out, lay down on the sofa at the bed's foot and fell fast asleep, Mr. Laurence marched to and fro in the parlor, feeling that he would rather face a rebel battery than Mrs. March's countenance as she entered. Laurie lay on the rug, pretending to rest, but staring into the fire with the thoughtful look which made his black eyes beautifully soft and clear.

The girls never forgot that night, for no sleep came to them as they kept their watch, with that dreadful sense of powerlessness which comes to us in hours like those.

powerlessness - impotencia

"If God spares Beth, I never will complain again," whispered Meg earnestly.

spares - repuestos; prescindir, pasar sin

"If God spares Beth, I'll try to love and serve Him all my life," answered Jo, with equal fervor.

spares - repuestos; palo, verga

fervor - fervor, ardor, acaloramiento, apasionamiento

"I wish I had no heart, it aches so," sighed Meg, after a pause.

"If life is often as hard as this, I don't see how we ever shall get through it," added her sister despondently.

despondently - Con desánimo

Here the clock struck twelve, and both forgot themselves in watching Beth, for they fancied a change passed over her wan face. The house was still as death, and nothing but the wailing of the wind broke the deep hush. Weary Hannah slept on, and no one but the sisters saw the pale shadow which seemed to fall upon the little bed. An hour went by, and nothing happened except Laurie's quiet departure for the station.

wan - pálido, macilento; débil

weary - cansado, cansino, cansar

Another hour, still no one came, and anxious fears of delay in the storm, or accidents by the way, or, worst of all, a great grief at Washington, haunted the girls.

It was past two, when Jo, who stood at the window thinking how dreary the world looked in its winding sheet of snow, heard a movement by the bed, and turning quickly, saw Meg kneeling before their mother's easy chair with her face hidden. A dreadful fear passed coldly over Jo, as she thought, "Beth is dead, and Meg is afraid to tell me."

She was back at her post in an instant, and to her excited eyes a great change seemed to have taken place. The fever flush and the look of pain were gone, and the beloved little face looked so pale and peaceful in its utter repose that Jo felt no desire to weep or to lament. Leaning low over this dearest of her sisters, she kissed the damp forehead with her heart on her lips, and softly whispered, "Good-by, my Beth. Good-by!"

flush - lanzar; rubor

As if awaked by the stir, Hannah started out of her sleep, hurried to the bed, looked at Beth, felt her hands, listened at her lips, and then, throwing her apron over her head, sat down to rock to and fro, exclaiming, under her breath, "The fever's turned, she's sleepin'nat'ral, her skin's damp, and she breathes easy. Praise be given! Oh, my goodness me!"

awaked - despertado; despertar(se)

sleepin - Durmiendo

Before the girls could believe the happy truth, the doctor came to confirm it. He was a homely man, but they thought his face quite heavenly when he smiled and said, with a fatherly look at them, "Yes, my dears, I think the little girl will pull through this time. Keep the house quiet, let her sleep, and when she wakes, give her..."

homely - ogareno; hogareno

pull through - superar, atravesar, recuperarse

What they were to give, neither heard, for both crept into the dark hall, and, sitting on the stairs, held each other close, rejoicing with hearts too full for words. When they went back to be kissed and cuddled by faithful Hannah, they found Beth lying, as she used to do, with her cheek pillowed on her hand, the dreadful pallor gone, and breathing quietly, as if just fallen asleep.

pillowed - almohada

pallor - palidez

"If Mother would only come now!" said Jo, as the winter night began to wane.

wane - disminuir; menguar

"See," said Meg, coming up with a white, half-opened rose, "I thought this would hardly be ready to lay in Beth's hand tomorrow if she"went away from us. But it has blossomed in the night, and now I mean to put it in my vase here, so that when the darling wakes, the first thing she sees will be the little rose, and Mother's face."

blossomed - floreció; flor, floración, florecer

Never had the sun risen so beautifully, and never had the world seemed so lovely as it did to the heavy eyes of Meg and Jo, as they looked out in the early morning, when their long, sad vigil was done.

vigil - vigilia, víspera

"It looks like a fairy world," said Meg, smiling to herself, as she stood behind the curtain, watching the dazzling sight.

"Hark!" cried Jo, starting to her feet.

Hark - Oyes

Yes, there was a sound of bells at the door below, a cry from Hannah, and then Laurie's voice saying in a joyful whisper, "Girls, she's come! She's come!"

CHAPTER NINETEEN. AMY'S WILL

While these things were happening at home, Amy was having hard times at Aunt March's. She felt her exile deeply, and for the first time in her life, realized how much she was beloved and petted at home. Aunt March never petted any one; she did not approve of it, but she meant to be kind, for the well-behaved little girl pleased her very much, and Aunt March had a soft place in her old heart for her nephew's children, though she didn't think it proper to confess it. She really did her best to make Amy happy, but, dear me, what mistakes she made. Some old people keep young at heart in spite of wrinkles and gray hairs, can sympathize with children's little cares and joys, make them feel at home, and can hide wise lessons under pleasant plays, giving and receiving friendship in the sweetest way.

nephew - sobrino

wrinkles - arrugas; arruga

sympathize - simpatizar

But Aunt March had not this gift, and she worried Amy very much with her rules and orders, her prim ways, and long, prosy talks. Finding the child more docile and amiable than her sister, the old lady felt it her duty to try and counteract, as far as possible, the bad effects of home freedom and indulgence. So she took Amy by the hand, and taught her as she herself had been taught sixty years ago, a process which carried dismay to Amy's soul, and made her feel like a fly in the web of a very strict spider.

more docile - más dócil

indulgence - complacencia; indulgencia

strict - estricto

She had to wash the cups every morning, and polish up the old-fashioned spoons, the fat silver teapot, and the glasses till they shone. Then she must dust the room, and what a trying job that was. Not a speck escaped Aunt March's eye, and all the furniture had claw legs and much carving, which was never dusted to suit. Then Polly had to be fed, the lap dog combed, and a dozen trips upstairs and down to get things or deliver orders, for the old lady was very lame and seldom left her big chair. After these tiresome labors, she must do her lessons, which was a daily trial of every virtue she possessed.

polish - pulir; polaco, polonés, polaco

speck - mancha; manchita

claw - garra

carving - tallar; tallado, escultura; (carve); cortar, trinchar, tallar

lap dog - perrito faldero; lamebotas

combed - peinado; peine

labors - trabajos; trabajo

Then she was allowed one hour for exercise or play, and didn't she enjoy it?

Laurie came every day, and wheedled Aunt March till Amy was allowed to go out with him, when they walked and rode and had capital times. After dinner, she had to read aloud, and sit still while the old lady slept, which she usually did for an hour, as she dropped off over the first page. Then patchwork or towels appeared, and Amy sewed with outward meekness and inward rebellion till dusk, when she was allowed to amuse herself as she liked till teatime.

wheedled - sobornada; engatusar, camelar, panish: t-needed

patchwork - almazuela

meekness - mansedumbre

inward - hacia dentro; interior, adentro

rebellion - rebelión, insurrección

dusk - oscurecer; anochecer, ocaso, crepúsculo

The evenings were the worst of all, for Aunt March fell to telling long stories about her youth, which were so unutterably dull that Amy was always ready to go to bed, intending to cry over her hard fate, but usually going to sleep before she had squeezed out more than a tear or two.

unutterably - ndeciblemente

squeezed out - exprimido, excluido

If it had not been for Laurie, and old Esther, the maid, she felt that she never could have got through that dreadful time. The parrot alone was enough to drive her distracted, for he soon felt that she did not admire him, and revenged himself by being as mischievous as possible.

Esther - Esther, Ester

He pulled her hair whenever she came near him, upset his bread and milk to plague her when she had newly cleaned his cage, made Mop bark by pecking at him while Madam dozed, called her names before company, and behaved in all respects like an reprehensible old bird. Then she could not endure the dog, a fat, cross beast who snarled and yelped at her when she made his toilet, and who lay on his back with all his legs in the air and a most idiotic expression of countenance when he wanted something to eat, which was about a dozen times a day. The cook was bad-tempered, the old coachman was deaf, and Esther the only one who ever took any notice of the young lady.

bark - corteza; ladrido

dozed - dormido; dormitar

reprehensible - reprobable; reprehensible

endure - soportar; aguantar, perdurar, tolerar, consentir, condescender

beast - bestia, animal, salvaje

snarled - grunó; grunir

yelped - gritó; ganir

most idiotic - el más estúpido

coachman - Cochero

deaf - sordo, sordos, sordas

Esther was a Frenchwoman, who had lived with ˜Madame', as she called her mistress, for many years, and who rather tyrannized over the old lady, who could not get along without her. Her real name was Estelle, but Aunt March ordered her to change it, and she obeyed, on condition that she was never asked to change her religion. She took a fancy to Mademoiselle, and amused her very much with odd stories of her life in France, when Amy sat with her while she got up Madame's laces.

Frenchwoman - francesa

tyrannized - tiranizado; tiranizar

laces - cordones; cordón

She also allowed her to roam about the great house, and examine the curious and pretty things stored away in the big wardrobes and the ancient chests, for Aunt March hoarded like a magpie. Amy's chief delight was an Indian cabinet, full of queer drawers, little pigeonholes, and secret places, in which were kept all sorts of ornaments, some precious, some merely curious, all more or less antique. To examine and arrange these things gave Amy great satisfaction, especially the jewel cases, in which on velvet cushions reposed the ornaments which had adorned a belle forty years ago. There was the garnet set which Aunt March wore when she came out, the pearls her father gave her on her wedding day, her lover's diamonds, the jet mourning rings and pins, the queer lockets, with portraits of dead friends and weeping willows made of hair inside, the baby bracelets her one little daughter had worn, Uncle March's big watch, with the red seal so many childish hands had played with, and in a box all by itself lay Aunt March's wedding ring, too small now for her fat finger, but put carefully away like the most precious jewel of them all.

wardrobes - armarios; armario, ropero, clóset, escaparate

hoarded - acaparado; provisión

Magpie - urraca, picaza, marica, pega

Indian - indio, hindú, indígena, indio, india

drawers - cajones; cajón

pigeonholes - casilleros; casilla, casillero, encasillar

ornaments - dornos; ornamento, ornamento musical

jewel - gema, joya, alhaja, rubí

garnet - Granate

jet - azabache

mourning - duelo, luto; (mourn); lamentar, estar de luto

lockets - lockets; medallón, guardapelo

weeping - Llorando; (weep) Llorando

willows - sauces; sauce, mimbrera, sauz

seal - sello

"Which would Mademoiselle choose if she had her will?" asked Esther, who always sat near to watch over and lock up the valuables.

"I like the diamonds best, but there is no necklace among them, and I'm fond of necklaces, they are so becoming. I should choose this if I might," replied Amy, looking with great admiration at a string of gold and ebony beads from which hung a heavy cross of the same.

necklaces - collares; collar

ebony - ébano, de ébano

beads - perlas; cuenta, gota

"I, too, covet that, but not as a necklace. Ah, no! To me it is a rosary, and as such I should use it like a good catholic," said Esther, eyeing the handsome thing wistfully.

covet - desear, codiciar, checkenvidiar

rosary - rosario, rosario

"Is it meant to use as you use the string of good-smelling wooden beads hanging over your glass?" asked Amy.

"Truly, yes, to pray with. It would be pleasing to the saints if one used so fine a rosary as this, instead of wearing it as a vain bijou."

"You seem to take a great deal of comfort in your prayers, Esther, and always come down looking quiet and satisfied. I wish I could."

"If Mademoiselle was a Catholic, she would find true comfort, but as that is not to be, it would be well if you went apart each day to meditate and pray, as did the good mistress whom I served before Madame. She had a little chapel, and in it found solacement for much trouble."

meditate - meditar

chapel - capilla

"Would it be right for me to do so too?" asked Amy, who in her loneliness felt the need of help of some sort, and found that she was apt to forget her little book, now that Beth was not there to remind her of it.

loneliness - soledad

"It would be excellent and charming, and I shall gladly arrange the little dressing room for you if you like it. Say nothing to Madame, but when she sleeps go you and sit alone a while to think good thoughts, and pray the dear God preserve your sister."

Esther was truly pious, and quite sincere in her advice, for she had an affectionate heart, and felt much for the sisters in their anxiety. Amy liked the idea, and gave her leave to arrange the light closet next her room, hoping it would do her good.

"I wish I knew where all these pretty things would go when Aunt March dies," she said, as she slowly replaced the shining rosary and shut the jewel cases one by one.

"To you and your sisters. I know it, Madame confides in me. I witnessed her will, and it is to be so," whispered Esther smiling.

confides - confía; confiar

witnessed - testigos; testimonio, testigo, prueba, testificar, probar

"How nice! But I wish she'd let us have them now. Procrastination is not agreeable," observed Amy, taking a last look at the diamonds.

procrastination - desidia, dejar algo para más tarde, para manana..

"It is too soon yet for the young ladies to wear these things. The first one who is affianced will have the pearls, Madame has said it, and I have a fancy that the little turquoise ring will be given to you when you go, for Madame approves your good behavior and charming manners."

affianced - afiance

turquoise - turquesa, turquesa

approves - lo aprueba; aprobar; tener un buen concepto de

"Do you think so? Oh, I'll be a lamb, if I can only have that lovely ring! It's ever so much prettier than Kitty Bryant's. I do like Aunt March after all." And Amy tried on the blue ring with a delighted face and a firm resolve to earn it.

lamb - cordero, carne de cordero, borrego, borrega

Kitty - gatito, minino, gatico, pozo, vaquita

tried on - Probado

firm - firma; firme, sólido

From that day she was a model of obedience, and the old lady complacently admired the success of her training. Esther fitted up the closet with a little table, placed a footstool before it, and over it a picture taken from one of the shut-up rooms. She thought it was of no great value, but, being appropriate, she borrowed it, well knowing that Madame would never know it, nor care if she did. It was, however, a very valuable copy of one of the famous pictures of the world, and Amy's beauty-loving eyes were never tired of looking up at the sweet face of the Divine Mother, while her tender thoughts of her own were busy at her heart.

obedience - obediencia

footstool - reposapiés, escabel

On the table she laid her little testament and hymnbook, kept a vase always full of the best flowers Laurie brought her, and came every day to ˜sit alone'thinking good thoughts, and praying the dear God to preserve her sister. Esther had given her a rosary of black beads with a silver cross, but Amy hung it up and did not use it, feeling doubtful as to its fitness for Protestant prayers.

Testament - testamento

hymnbook - imnario

Protestant - protestante

The little girl was very sincere in all this, for being left alone outside the safe home nest, she felt the need of some kind hand to hold by so sorely that she instinctively turned to the strong and tender Friend, whose fatherly love most closely surrounds His little children. She missed her mother's help to understand and rule herself, but having been taught where to look, she did her best to find the way and walk in it confidingly. But, Amy was a young pilgrim, and just now her burden seemed very heavy. She tried to forget herself, to keep cheerful, and be satisfied with doing right, though no one saw or praised her for it.

sorely - Dolorosamente

instinctively - instintivamente

closely - de cerca; cercanamente

surrounds - circundar, envolver, cercar, rodear

In her first effort at being very, very good, she decided to make her will, as Aunt March had done, so that if she did fall ill and die, her possessions might be justly and generously divided. It cost her a pang even to think of giving up the little treasures which in her eyes were as precious as the old lady's jewels.

fall ill - enfermar

justly - con justicia; justamente, con razón

generously - generosamente

pang - punzada, dolor agudo

jewels - joyas; gema, joya, alhaja, rubí

During one of her play hours she wrote out the important document as well as she could, with some help from Esther as to certain legal terms, and when the good-natured Frenchwoman had signed her name, Amy felt relieved and laid it by to show Laurie, whom she wanted as a second witness. As it was a rainy day, she went upstairs to amuse herself in one of the large chambers, and took Polly with her for company. In this room there was a wardrobe full of old-fashioned costumes with which Esther allowed her to play, and it was her favorite amusement to array herself in the faded brocades, and parade up and down before the long mirror, making stately curtsies, and sweeping her train about with a rustle which delighted her ears.

witness - testimonio, testigo, prueba, testificar, probar, presenciar

chambers - cámaras; cámara, recámara, compartimento

faded - desvanecido; moda, moda pasajera

brocades - brocados; bordado, bordadura, panish: t-needed

curtsies - una reverencia; reverencia

So busy was she on this day that she did not hear Laurie's ring nor see his face peeping in at her as she gravely promenaded to and fro, flirting her fan and tossing her head, on which she wore a great pink turban, contrasting oddly with her blue brocade dress and yellow quilted petticoat. She was obliged to walk carefully, for she had on high-heeled shoes, and, as Laurie told Jo afterward, it was a comical sight to see her mince along in her gay suit, with Polly sidling and bridling just behind her, imitating her as well as he could, and occasionally stopping to laugh or exclaim, "Ain't we fine? Get along, you fright! Hold your tongue! Kiss me, dear! Ha! Ha!"

turban - turbante

oddly - extranamente; extranamente, curiosamente, sorprendentemente

brocade - brocado; bordado, bordadura, panish: t-needed

quilted - acolchado; colcha, edredón, acolchar

petticoat - enaguas

mince - picadillo, carne picada, carne molida, picar

bridling - frenando; brida

imitating - imitando; imitar

Having with difficulty restrained an explosion of merriment, lest it should offend her majesty, Laurie tapped and was graciously received.

offend - ofender

Majesty - majestad

tapped - intervenido; golpecito, palmadita

"Sit down and rest while I put these things away, then I want to consult you about a very serious matter," said Amy, when she had shown her splendor and driven Polly into a corner. "That bird is the trial of my life," she continued, removing the pink mountain from her head, while Laurie seated himself astride a chair.

astride - a horcajadas

"Yesterday, when Aunt was asleep and I was trying to be as still as a mouse, Polly began to squall and flap about in his cage, so I went to let him out, and found a big spider there. I poked it out, and it ran under the bookcase. Polly marched straight after it, stooped down and peeped under the bookcase, saying, in his funny way, with a cock of his eye, ˜Come out and take a walk, my dear.

squall - chillar; tormenta, borrasca

bookcase - librería; estantería, librero, biblioteca

cock - polla; gallo, macho

I couldn't help laughing, which made Poll swear, and Aunt woke up and scolded us both."

swear - jurar

"Did the spider accept the old fellow's invitation?" asked Laurie, yawning.

"Yes, out it came, and away ran Polly, frightened to death, and scrambled up on Aunt's chair, calling out, ˜Catch her! Catch her! Catch her!'as I chased the spider."

chased - perseguido; perseguir

"That's a lie! Oh, lor!" cried the parrot, pecking at Laurie's toes.

"I'd wring your neck if you were mine, you old torment," cried Laurie, shaking his fist at the bird, who put his head on one side and gravely croaked, "Allyluyer! bless your buttons, dear!"

torment - tormento, atormentar

"Now I'm ready," said Amy, shutting the wardrobe and taking a piece of paper out of her pocket. "I want you to read that, please, and tell me if it is legal and right. I felt I ought to do it, for life is uncertain and I don't want any ill feeling over my tomb."

uncertain - incierto

Laurie bit his lips, and turning a little from the pensive speaker, read the following document, with praiseworthy gravity, considering the spelling:

gravity - gravedad

MY last will AND TESTIMENT

last will - última voluntad

I, Amy Curtis March, being in my sane mind, go give and bequeethe all my earthly property"viz. to wit:"namely

sane - sano; cuerdo

bequeethe - egar

wit - agudeza, ingenio, chispa, gracia

namely - específicamente, a saber, nombradamente

To my father, my best pictures, sketches, maps, and works of art, including frames. Also my $100, to do what he likes with.

sketches - esbozos; bosquejar, esbozar, pergenar, esbozo, bosquejo

To my mother, all my clothes, except the blue apron with pockets"also my likeness, and my medal, with much love.

likeness - semejanza; retrato, trasunto

medal - medalla

To my dear sister Margaret, I give my turkquoise ring (if I get it), also my green box with the doves on it, also my piece of real lace for her neck, and my sketch of her as a memorial of her ˜little girl'.

turkquoise - turquesa

memorial - monumento conmemorativo, conmemoración

To Jo I leave my breastpin, the one mended with sealing wax, also my bronze inkstand"she lost the cover"and my most precious plaster rabbit, because I am sorry I burned up her story.

breastpin - Pinza

sealing wax - Cera de sellado

bronze - bronce, broncíneo, broncínea, éneo, bronceado, tostado, pavonar

plaster - esparadrapo; ungüento, yeso, escayola, enlucido, revoque

rabbit - conejo

To Beth (if she lives after me) I give my dolls and the little bureau, my fan, my linen collars and my new slippers if she can wear them being thin when she gets well. And I herewith also leave her my regret that I ever made fun of old Joanna.

collars - collares; cuello, collar, yugo

To my friend and neighbor Theodore Laurence I bequeethe my paper mashay portfolio, my clay model of a horse though he did say it hadn't any neck. Also in return for his great kindness in the hour of affliction any one of my artistic works he likes, Noter Dame is the best.

To our venerable benefactor Mr. Laurence I leave my purple box with a looking glass in the cover which will be nice for his pens and remind him of the departed girl who thanks him for his favors to her family, especially Beth.

benefactor - bienhechor, benefactor

I wish my favorite playmate Kitty Bryant to have the blue silk apron and my gold-bead ring with a kiss.

playmate - companero de juegos; panish: t-needed

To Hannah I give the bandbox she wanted and all the patchwork I leave hoping she ˜will remember me, when it you see'.

And now having disposed of my most valuable property I hope all will be satisfied and not blame the dead. I forgive everyone, and trust we may all meet when the trump shall sound. Amen.

Amen - amén

To this will and testiment I set my hand and seal on this 20th day of Nov. Anni Domino 1861.

seal - sello

Amy Curtis March

Witnesses:

witnesses - testigos; testimonio, testigo, prueba, testificar, probar

Estelle Valnor, Theodore Laurence.

The last name was written in pencil, and Amy explained that he was to rewrite it in ink and seal it up for her properly.

rewrite - reescribir

"What put it into your head? Did anyone tell you about Beth's giving away her things?" asked Laurie soberly, as Amy laid a bit of red tape, with sealing wax, a taper, and a standish before him.

sealing - Sellado; (seal) Sellado

wax - cera

She explained and then asked anxiously, "What about Beth?"

"I'm sorry I spoke, but as I did, I'll tell you. She felt so ill one day that she told Jo she wanted to give her piano to Meg, her cats to you, and the poor old doll to Jo, who would love it for her sake. She was sorry she had so little to give, and left locks of hair to the rest of us, and her best love to Grandpa. She never thought of a will."

Laurie was signing and sealing as he spoke, and did not look up till a great tear dropped on the paper. Amy's face was full of trouble, but she only said, "Don't people put sort of postscripts to their wills, sometimes?"

postscripts - postdatos; posdata

"Yes, ˜codicils', they call them."

codicils - codicilos; codicilo

"Put one in mine then, that I wish all my curls cut off, and given round to my friends. I forgot it, but I want it done though it will spoil my looks."

Laurie added it, smiling at Amy's last and greatest sacrifice. Then he amused her for an hour, and was much interested in all her trials. But when he came to go, Amy held him back to whisper with trembling lips, "Is there really any danger about Beth?"

"I'm afraid there is, but we must hope for the best, so don't cry, dear." And Laurie put his arm about her with a brotherly gesture which was very comforting.

When he had gone, she went to her little chapel, and sitting in the twilight, prayed for Beth, with streaming tears and an aching heart, feeling that a million turquoise rings would not console her for the loss of her gentle little sister.

streaming - treaming; (stream); corriente, flujo, arroyo, fluir

CHAPTER TWENTY. CONFIDENTIAL

I don't think I have any words in which to tell the meeting of the mother and daughters. Such hours are beautiful to live, but very hard to describe, so I will leave it to the imagination of my readers, merely saying that the house was full of genuine happiness, and that Meg's tender hope was realized, for when Beth woke from that long, healing sleep, the first objects on which her eyes fell were the little rose and Mother's face.

healing - Curación; (heal) Curación

Too weak to wonder at anything, she only smiled and nestled close in the loving arms about her, feeling that the hungry longing was satisfied at last. Then she slept again, and the girls waited upon their mother, for she would not unclasp the thin hand which clung to hers even in sleep.

Hannah had ˜dished up'an astonishing breakfast for the traveler, finding it impossible to vent her excitement in any other way, and Meg and Jo fed their mother like dutiful young storks, while they listened to her whispered account of Father's state, Mr.

dutiful - obediente

storks - c cigüenas; cigüena

Brooke's promise to stay and nurse him, the delays which the storm occasioned on the homeward journey, and the unspeakable comfort Laurie's hopeful face had given her when she arrived, worn out with fatigue, anxiety, and cold.

delays - retrasos; aplazar, retrasar

homeward journey - viaje de vuelta a casa

fatigue - fatiga, fatigar, acosar

What a strange yet pleasant day that was. So brilliant and gay without, for all the world seemed abroad to welcome the first snow. So quiet and reposeful within, for everyone slept, spent with watching, and a Sabbath stillness reigned through the house, while nodding Hannah mounted guard at the door. With a blissful sense of burdens lifted off, Meg and Jo closed their weary eyes, and lay at rest, like storm-beaten boats safe at anchor in a quiet harbor. Mrs.

reposeful - reposado

Sabbath - sábado, sabbat, domingo, aquelarre

blissful - dichoso, feliz, maravilloso

anchor - ancla

harbor - puerto

March would not leave Beth's side, but rested in the big chair, waking often to look at, touch, and brood over her child, like a miser over some recovered treasure.

miser - miserable; tacano, rata, pesetero, tacano

Laurie meanwhile posted off to comfort Amy, and told his story so well that Aunt March actually ˜sniffed'herself, and never once said "I told you so". Amy came out so strong on this occasion that I think the good thoughts in the little chapel really began to bear fruit. She dried her tears quickly, restrained her impatience to see her mother, and never even thought of the turquoise ring, when the old lady heartily agreed in Laurie's opinion, that she behaved ˜like a capital little woman'. Even Polly seemed impressed, for he called her a good girl, blessed her buttons, and begged her to "come and take a walk, dear", in his most affable tone.

Impatience - impaciencia

most affable - el más afable

She would very gladly have gone out to enjoy the bright wintry weather, but discovering that Laurie was dropping with sleep in spite of manful efforts to conceal the fact, she persuaded him to rest on the sofa, while she wrote a note to her mother. She was a long time about it, and when she returned, he was stretched out with both arms under his head, sound asleep, while Aunt March had pulled down the curtains and sat doing nothing in an unusual fit of benignity.

benignity - Benignidad

After a while, they began to think he was not going to wake up till night, and I'm not sure that he would, had he not been effectually roused by Amy's cry of joy at sight of her mother. There probably were a good many happy little girls in and about the city that day, but it is my private opinion that Amy was the happiest of all, when she sat in her mother's lap and told her trials, receiving consolation and compensation in the shape of approving smiles and fond caresses.

at sight - a la vista

compensation - compensación; contrapartida

caresses - caricias; caricia, carantona, acariciar

They were alone together in the chapel, to which her mother did not object when its purpose was explained to her.

"On the contrary, I like it very much, dear," looking from the dusty rosary to the well-worn little book, and the lovely picture with its garland of evergreen. "It is an excellent plan to have some place where we can go to be quiet, when things vex or grieve us. There are a good many hard times in this life of ours, but we can always bear them if we ask help in the right way. I think my little girl is learning this."

evergreen - perenne; perennifolio

vex - molestar, irritar, disgustar, afligir, atormentar, fastidiar

"Yes, Mother, and when I go home I mean to have a corner in the big closet to put my books and the copy of that picture which I've tried to make. The woman's face is not good, it's too beautiful for me to draw, but the baby is done better, and I love it very much. I like to think He was a little child once, for then I don't seem so far away, and that helps me."

As Amy pointed to the smiling Christ child on his Mother's knee, Mrs. March saw something on the lifted hand that made her smile. She said nothing, but Amy understood the look, and after a minute's pause, she added gravely, "I wanted to speak to you about this, but I forgot it.

Christ - Cristo, Jesucristo, Cristo

Aunt gave me the ring today. She called me to her and kissed me, and put it on my finger, and said I was a credit to her, and she'd like to keep me always. She gave that funny guard to keep the turquoise on, as it's too big. I'd like to wear them Mother, can I?"

"They are very pretty, but I think you're rather too young for such ornaments, Amy," said Mrs. March, looking at the plump little hand, with the band of sky-blue stones on the forefinger, and the quaint guard formed of two tiny golden hands clasped together.

forefinger - índice, dedo índice

quaint - raro, singular; pintoresco

clasped - agarrado; broche, manija, corchete, hebilla, agarrar

"I'll try not to be vain," said Amy. "I don't think I like it only because it's so pretty, but I want to wear it as the girl in the story wore her bracelet, to remind me of something."

"Do you mean Aunt March?" asked her mother, laughing.

"No, to remind me not to be selfish." Amy looked so earnest and sincere about it that her mother stopped laughing, and listened respectfully to the little plan.

"I've thought a great deal lately about my ˜bundle of naughties', and being selfish is the largest one in it, so I'm going to try hard to cure it, if I can. Beth isn't selfish, and that's the reason everyone loves her and feels so bad at the thoughts of losing her. People wouldn't feel so bad about me if I was sick, and I don't deserve to have them, but I'd like to be loved and missed by a great many friends, so I'm going to try and be like Beth all I can.

naughties - los naughties; cachondo, travieso, maleducado, obsceno, picante

try hard - esforzarse

I'm apt to forget my resolutions, but if I had something always about me to remind me, I guess I should do better. May we try this way?"

"Yes, but I have more faith in the corner of the big closet. Wear your ring, dear, and do your best. I think you will prosper, for the sincere wish to be good is half the battle. Now I must go back to Beth. Keep up your heart, little daughter, and we will soon have you home again."

That evening while Meg was writing to her father to report the traveler's safe arrival, Jo slipped upstairs into Beth's room, and finding her mother in her usual place, stood a minute twisting her fingers in her hair, with a worried gesture and an undecided look.

twisting - Torciendo; (twist); torcer, sacar punta a, torcerse

"What is it, deary?" asked Mrs. March, holding out her hand, with a face which invited confidence.

"I want to tell you something, Mother."

"About Meg?"

"How quickly you guessed! Yes, it's about her, and though it's a little thing, it fidgets me."

"Beth is asleep. Speak low, and tell me all about it. That Moffat hasn't been here, I hope?" asked Mrs. March rather sharply.

"No. I should have shut the door in his face if he had," said Jo, settling herself on the floor at her mother's feet. "Last summer Meg left a pair of gloves over at the Laurences'and only one was returned. We forgot about it, till Teddy told me that Mr. Brooke owned that he liked Meg but didn't dare say so, she was so young and he so poor. Now, isn't it a dreadful state of things?"

"Do you think Meg cares for him?" asked Mrs. March, with an anxious look.

"Mercy me! I don't know anything about love and such nonsense!" cried Jo, with a funny mixture of interest and contempt. "In novels, the girls show it by starting and blushing, fainting away, growing thin, and acting like fools. Now Meg does not do anything of the sort.

contempt - desprecio, desdén, desgracia, deshonra, vergüenza, desacato

She eats and drinks and sleeps like a sensible creature, she looks straight in my face when I talk about that man, and only blushes a little bit when Teddy jokes about lovers. I forbid him to do it, but he doesn't mind me as he ought."

blushes - se ruboriza; sonrojo, rubor

forbid - prohibir, vedar, vetar, negar

"Then you fancy that Meg is not interested in John?"

"Who?" cried Jo, staring.

"Mr. Brooke. I call him ˜John'now. We fell into the way of doing so at the hospital, and he likes it."

"Oh, dear! I know you'll take his part. He's been good to Father, and you won't send him away, but let Meg marry him, if she wants to. Mean thing! To go petting Papa and helping you, just to wheedle you into liking him." And Jo pulled her hair again with a wrathful tweak.

wheedle - ganar; engatusar, camelar, panish: t-needed

wrathful - irabioso; furioso

tweak - retocar, retoque

"My dear, don't get angry about it, and I will tell you how it happened. John went with me at Mr. Laurence's request, and was so devoted to poor Father that we couldn't help getting fond of him. He was perfectly open and honorable about Meg, for he told us he loved her, but would earn a comfortable home before he asked her to marry him.

honorable - honorable, honroso

He only wanted our leave to love her and work for her, and the right to make her love him if he could. He is a truly excellent young man, and we could not refuse to listen to him, but I will not consent to Meg's engaging herself so young."

"Of course not. It would be idiotic! I knew there was mischief brewing. I felt it, and now it's worse than I imagined. I just wish I could marry Meg myself, and keep her safe in the family."

idiotic - idiótico, idiota

brewing - cervando; elaboración de cerveza; (brew) cervando; elaboración de cerveza

This odd arrangement made Mrs. March smile, but she said gravely, "Jo, I confide in you and don't wish you to say anything to Meg yet. When John comes back, and I see them together, I can judge better of her feelings toward him."

"She'll see those handsome eyes that she talks about, and then it will be all up with her. She's got such a soft heart, it will melt like butter in the sun if anyone looks sentimentlly at her. She read the short reports he sent more than she did your letters, and pinched me when I spoke of it, and likes brown eyes, and doesn't think John an ugly name, and she'll go and fall in love, and there's an end of peace and fun, and cozy times together. I see it all! They'll go lovering around the house, and we shall have to dodge. Meg will be absorbed and no good to me any more.

sentimentlly - Sentimentalmente

pinched - pellizcado; pellizcar, repizcar, afanar, chorizar, pellizco

Dodge - evadir, esquivar, capear

Brooke will scratch up a fortune somehow, carry her off, and make a hole in the family, and I shall break my heart, and everything will be abominably uncomfortable. Oh, dear me! Why weren't we all boys, then there wouldn't be any bother."

scratch - rascar, raspar, aranar, rasgunar, rayar, aranazo, rayadura

abominably - abominablemente

Jo leaned her chin on her knees in a disconsolate attitude and shook her fist at the reprehensible John. Mrs. March sighed, and Jo looked up with an air of relief.

disconsolate - desconsolado

"You don't like it, Mother? I'm glad of it. Let's send him about his business, and not tell Meg a word of it, but all be happy together as we always have been."

"I did wrong to sigh, Jo. It is natural and right you should all go to homes of your own in time, but I do want to keep my girls as long as I can, and I am sorry that this happened so soon, for Meg is only seventeen and it will be some years before John can make a home for her. Your father and I have agreed that she shall not bind herself in any way, nor be married, before twenty. If she and John love one another, they can wait, and test the love by doing so. She is conscientious, and I have no fear of her treating him unkindly.

conscientious - consciente; concienzudo

unkindly - Sin amabilidad

My pretty, tender hearted girl! I hope things will go happily with her."

"Hadn't you rather have her marry a rich man?" asked Jo, as her mother's voice faltered a little over the last words.

faltered - aciló; dudar

"Money is a good and useful thing, Jo, and I hope my girls will never feel the need of it too bitterly, nor be tempted by too much. I should like to know that John was firmly established in some good business, which gave him an income large enough to keep free from debt and make Meg comfortable. I'm not ambitious for a splendid fortune, a fashionable position, or a great name for my girls. If rank and money come with love and virtue, also, I should accept them gratefully, and enjoy your good fortune, but I know, by experience, how much genuine happiness can be had in a plain little house, where the daily bread is earned, and some privations give sweetness to the few pleasures. I am content to see Meg begin humbly, for if I am not mistaken, she will be rich in the possession of a good man's heart, and that is better than a fortune.

established - establecido; establecer, instaurar, nombrar

income - ingresos, renta

keep free - Mantenerse libre

free from debt - libre de deudas

rank - rango, graduación

"I understand, Mother, and quite agree, but I'm disappointed about Meg, for I'd planned to have her marry Teddy by-and-by and sit in the lap of luxury all her days. Wouldn't it be nice?" asked Jo, looking up with a brighter face.

"He is younger than she, you know," began Mrs. March, but Jo broke in...

"Only a little, he's old for his age, and tall, and can be quite grown-up in his manners if he likes. Then he's rich and generous and good, and loves us all, and I say it's a pity my plan is spoiled."

"I'm afraid Laurie is hardly grown-up enough for Meg, and altogether too much of a weathercock just now for anyone to depend on. Don't make plans, Jo, but let time and their own hearts mate your friends. We can't meddle safely in such matters, and had better not get ˜romantic rubbish'as you call it, into our heads, lest it spoil our friendship."

make plans - hacer planes

meddle - entrometerse, inmiscuirse, injerirse, mangonear

"Well, I won't, but I hate to see things going all crisscross and getting snarled up, when a pull here and a snip there would straighten it out. I wish wearing flatirons on our heads would keep us from growing up. But buds will be roses, and kittens cats, more's the pity!"

Snip - recortes; cortar

"What's that about flatirons and cats?" asked Meg, as she crept into the room with the finished letter in her hand.

"Only one of my stupid speeches. I'm going to bed. Come, Peggy," said Jo, unfolding herself like an animated puzzle.

unfolding - desarrollándose; (unfold); desplegar

puzzle - rompecabezas, enigma, puzle, acertijo, intrigar, dejar perplejo

"Quite right, and beautifully written. Please add that I send my love to John," said Mrs. March, as she glanced over the letter and gave it back.

"Do you call him ˜John'?" asked Meg, smiling, with her innocent eyes looking down into her mother's.

"Yes, he has been like a son to us, and we are very fond of him," replied Mrs. March, returning the look with a keen one.

"I'm glad of that, he is so lonely. Good night, Mother, dear. It is so inexpressibly comfortable to have you here," was Meg's answer.

inexpressibly - nexpresablemente

The kiss her mother gave her was a very tender one, and as she went away, Mrs. March said, with a mixture of satisfaction and regret, "She does not love John yet, but will soon learn to."

CHAPTER TWENTY-ONE. LAURIE MAKES MISCHIEF, AND JO MAKES PEACE

Jo's face was a study next day, for the secret rather weighed upon her, and she found it hard not to look mysterious and important. Meg observed it, but did not trouble herself to make inquiries, for she had learned that the best way to manage Jo was by the law of contraries, so she felt sure of being told everything if she did not ask. She was rather surprised, therefore, when the silence remained unbroken, and Jo assumed a patronizing air, which decidedly aggravated Meg, who in turn assumed an air of dignified reserve and devoted herself to her mother.

contraries - contrarios; contrario

reserve - reserva, reservar

This left Jo to her own devices, for Mrs. March had taken her place as nurse, and bade her rest, exercise, and amuse herself after her long confinement. Amy being gone, Laurie was her only refuge, and much as she enjoyed his society, she rather dreaded him just then, for he was an incorrigible tease, and she feared he would coax the secret from her.

confinement - confinamiento

dreaded - temido; temer, pavor, temor

incorrigible - incorregible, empecatado

coax - coaxial; engatusar

She was quite right, for the mischief-loving lad no sooner suspected a mystery than he set himself to find it out, and led Jo a trying life of it. He wheedled, bribed, ridiculed, threatened, and scolded; affected indifference, that he might surprise the truth from her; declared he knew, then that he didn't care; and at last, by dint of perseverance, he satisfied himself that it concerned Meg and Mr.

bribed - sobornada; soborno, coima, sobornar, cohechar, coimear

ridiculed - idiculizado; ridiculizar, poner en ridículo

threatened - amenazado; amenazar

indifference - indiferencia

dint - no; abolladura

perseverance - perseverancia

concerned - preocupado; preocupación, referirse a, ataner, concernir, tocar

Brooke. Feeling indignant that he was not taken into his tutor's confidence, he set his wits to work to devise some proper retaliation for the slight.

devise - dear; concebir, inventar, tramar, maquinar, legar

retaliation - represalias; represalia

Meg meanwhile had apparently forgotten the matter and was absorbed in preparations for her father's return, but all of a sudden a change seemed to come over her, and, for a day or two, she was quite unlike herself. She started when spoken to, blushed when looked at, was very quiet, and sat over her sewing, with a timid, troubled look on her face.

apparently - evidentemente, obviamente, por lo visto, aparentemente

To her mother's inquiries she answered that she was quite well, and Jo's she silenced by begging to be let alone.

silenced - silenciado; silencio, silenciar, hacer callar

"She feels it in the air"love, I mean"and she's going very fast. She's got most of the symptoms"is twittery and cross, doesn't eat, lies awake, and mopes in corners. I caught her singing that song he gave her, and once she said ˜John', as you do, and then turned as red as a poppy. Whatever shall we do?" said Jo, looking ready for any measures, however violent.

mopes - mofas; desanimarse

poppy - amapola

"Nothing but wait. Let her alone, be kind and patient, and Father's coming will settle everything," replied her mother.

"Here's a note to you, Meg, all sealed up. How odd! Teddy never seals mine," said Jo next day, as she distributed the contents of the little post office.

sealed up - sellado

Seals - sellos; sello

distributed - distribuido; distribuir, repartir

Contents - ontenido; satisfecho

Mrs. March and Jo were deep in their own affairs, when a sound from Meg made them look up to see her staring at her note with a frightened face.

"My child, what is it?" cried her mother, running to her, while Jo tried to take the paper which had done the mischief.

"It's all a mistake, he didn't send it. Oh, Jo, how could you do it?" and Meg hid her face in her hands, crying as if her heart were quite broken.

"Me! I've done nothing! What's she talking about?" cried Jo, bewildered.

Meg's mild eyes kindled with anger as she pulled a crumpled note from her pocket and threw it at Jo, saying reproachfully, "You wrote it, and that bad boy helped you. How could you be so rude, so mean, and cruel to us both?"

Jo hardly heard her, for she and her mother were reading the note, which was written in a peculiar hand.

"My Dearest Margaret,

"I can no longer restrain my passion, and must know my fate before I return. I dare not tell your parents yet, but I think they would consent if they knew that we adored one another. Mr. Laurence will help me to some good place, and then, my sweet girl, you will make me happy. I implore you to say nothing to your family yet, but to send one word of hope through Laurie to,

adored - dorado; adorar, querer

sweet girl - dulce chica

implore - implorar

"Your devoted John."

"Oh, the little villain! That's the way he meant to pay me for keeping my word to Mother. I'll give him a hearty scolding and bring him over to beg pardon," cried Jo, burning to execute immediate justice. But her mother held her back, saying, with a look she seldom wore...

execute - ejecutar, ajusticiar, arrancar

justice - justicia, justedad, justeza, justicia

"Stop, Jo, you must clear yourself first. You have played so many pranks that I am afraid you have had a hand in this."

"On my word, Mother, I haven't! I never saw that note before, and don't know anything about it, as true as I live!" said Jo, so earnestly that they believed her. "If I had taken part in it I'd have done it better than this, and have written a sensible note. I should think you'd have known Mr. Brooke wouldn't write such stuff as that," she added, scornfully tossing down the paper.

"It's like his writing," faltered Meg, comparing it with the note in her hand.

"Oh, Meg, you didn't answer it?" cried Mrs. March quickly.

"Yes, I did!" and Meg hid her face again, overcome with shame.

"Here's a scrape! Do let me bring that wicked boy over to explain and be lectured. I can't rest till I get hold of him." And Jo made for the door again.

"Hush! Let me handle this, for it is worse than I thought. Margaret, tell me the whole story," commanded Mrs. March, sitting down by Meg, yet keeping hold of Jo, lest she should fly off.

"I received the first letter from Laurie, who didn't look as if he knew anything about it," began Meg, without looking up. "I was worried at first and meant to tell you, then I remembered how you liked Mr. Brooke, so I thought you wouldn't mind if I kept my little secret for a few days. I'm so silly that I liked to think no one knew, and while I was deciding what to say, I felt like the girls in books, who have such things to do. Forgive me, Mother, I'm paid for my silliness now.

I never can look him in the face again."

"What did you say to him?" asked Mrs. March.

"I only said I was too young to do anything about it yet, that I didn't wish to have secrets from you, and he must speak to father. I was very grateful for his kindness, and would be his friend, but nothing more, for a long while."

Mrs. March smiled, as if well pleased, and Jo clapped her hands, exclaiming, with a laugh, "You are almost equal to Caroline Percy, who was a pattern of prudence! Tell on, Meg. What did he say to that?"

prudence - prudencia

"He writes in a different way entirely, telling me that he never sent any love letter at all, and is very sorry that my roguish sister, Jo, should take liberties with our names. It's very kind and respectful, but think how dreadful for me!"

Meg leaned against her mother, looking the image of despair, and Jo tramped about the room, calling Laurie names. All of a sudden she stopped, caught up the two notes, and after looking at them closely, said decidedly, "I don't believe Brooke ever saw either of these letters. Teddy wrote both, and keeps yours to crow over me with because I wouldn't tell him my secret."

crow - cuervo, grajo

"Don't have any secrets, Jo. Tell it to Mother and keep out of trouble, as I should have done," said Meg warningly.

"Bless you, child! Mother told me."

"That will do, Jo. I'll comfort Meg while you go and get Laurie. I shall sift the matter to the bottom, and put a stop to such pranks at once."

sift - tamizar, cernir, separar, juzgar

Away ran Jo, and Mrs. March gently told Meg Mr. Brooke's real feelings. "Now, dear, what are your own? Do you love him enough to wait till he can make a home for you, or will you keep yourself quite free for the present?"

"I've been so scared and worried, I don't want to have anything to do with lovers for a long while, perhaps never," answered Meg petulantly. "If John doesn't know anything about this nonsense, don't tell him, and make Jo and Laurie hold their tongues. I won't be deceived and plagued and made a fool of. It's a shame!"

be deceived - enganado

Seeing Meg's usually gentle temper was roused and her pride hurt by this mischievous joke, Mrs. March soothed her by promises of entire silence and great discretion for the future.

soothed - calmado; calmar, serenar, aliviar, aliviarse, descansar

discretion - discreción

The instant Laurie's step was heard in the hall, Meg fled into the study, and Mrs. March received the culprit alone. Jo had not told him why he was wanted, fearing he wouldn't come, but he knew the minute he saw Mrs. March's face, and stood twirling his hat with a guilty air which convicted him at once. Jo was dismissed, but chose to march up and down the hall like a sentinel, having some fear that the prisoner might bolt. The sound of voices in the parlor rose and fell for half an hour, but what happened during that interview the girls never knew.

twirling - girando; pirueta, girar

convicted - condenado; condenar

dismissed - despedido; despedir, echar, disipar, rechazar, expulsar

sentinel - guarda, centinela

bolt - perno; pestillo

When they were called in, Laurie was standing by their mother with such a penitent face that Jo forgave him on the spot, but did not think it wise to betray the fact. Meg received his humble apology, and was much comforted by the assurance that Brooke knew nothing of the joke.

forgave - perdonó; perdonar, disculpar

betray - traicionar, entregar, vender, delatar, demostrar

apology - una disculpa; disculpa, excusa

"I'll never tell him to my dying day, wild horses shan't drag it out of me, so you'll forgive me, Meg, and I'll do anything to show how out-and-out sorry I am," he added, looking very much ashamed of himself.

"I'll try, but it was a very ungentlemanly thing to do, I didn't think you could be so sly and malicious, Laurie," replied Meg, trying to hide her maidenly confusion under a gravely reproachful air.

ungentlemanly - poco caballeroso

malicious - malicioso; maligno

maidenly - Doncella

"It was altogether abominable, and I don't deserve to be spoken to for a month, but you will, though, won't you?" And Laurie folded his hands together with such and imploring gesture, as he spoke in his irresistibly persuasive tone, that it was impossible to frown upon him in spite of his scandalous behavior.

irresistibly - irresistiblemente

scandalous - escandaloso

Meg pardoned him, and Mrs. March's grave face relaxed, in spite of her efforts to keep sober, when she heard him declare that he would atone for his sins by all sorts of penances, and abase himself like a worm before the injured damsel.

penances - penitencias; penitencia, penitencia

abase - rebajar, degradar, humillar

worm - gusano, lombriz, alimana, rata

damsel - damasel; doncella, muchacha

Jo stood aloof, meanwhile, trying to harden her heart against him, and succeeding only in primming up her face into an expression of entire disapprobation. Laurie looked at her once or twice, but as she showed no sign of relenting, he felt injured, and turned his back on her till the others were done with him, when he made her a low bow and walked off without a word.

aloof - apartado, distante, sin compasión, alejado, reservado

harden - Se endurece

primming - imprimación; formal, remilgado

disapprobation - Desaprobación

relenting - Cediendo; (relent); ceder

As soon as he had gone, she wished she had been more forgiving, and when Meg and her mother went upstairs, she felt lonely and longed for Teddy. After resisting for some time, she yielded to the impulse, and armed with a book to return, went over to the big house.

forgiving - perdonar, disculpar

resisting - resistiendo; resistir, panish: t-needed

impulse - impulso, capricho

"Is Mr. Laurence in?" asked Jo, of a housemaid, who was coming downstairs.

housemaid - Empleada doméstica

"Yes, Miss, but I don't believe he's seeable just yet."

seeable - Visible

"Why not? Is he ill?"

"La, no Miss, but he's had a scene with Mr. Laurie, who is in one of his tantrums about something, which vexes the old gentleman, so I dursn't go nigh him."

tantrums - abietas; rabieta, berrinche, pataleta, cortón

Vexes - vexes; molestar, irritar, disgustar, afligir, atormentar

nigh - cerca, cabe, cercano

"Where is Laurie?"

"Shut up in his room, and he won't answer, though I've been a-tapping. I don't know what's to become of the dinner, for it's ready, and there's no one to eat it."

tapping - Golpeando; (tap) Golpeando

"I'll go and see what the matter is. I'm not afraid of either of them."

Up went Jo, and knocked smartly on the door of Laurie's little study.

smartly - Inteligentemente

"Stop that, or I'll open the door and make you!" called out the young gentleman in a threatening tone.

Jo immediately knocked again. The door flew open, and in she bounced before Laurie could recover from his surprise. Seeing that he really was out of temper, Jo, who knew how to manage him, assumed a contrite expression, and going artistically down upon her knees, said meekly, "Please forgive me for being so cross. I came to make it up, and can't go away till I have."

contrite - contrito, arrepentido

"It's all right. Get up, and don't be a goose, Jo," was the cavalier reply to her petition.

cavalier - caballero

petition - petición

"Thank you, I will. Could I ask what's the matter? You don't look exactly easy in your mind."

"I've been shaken, and I won't bear it!" growled Laurie indignantly.

growled - grunó; rugido, grunir

"Who did it?" demanded Jo.

"Grandfather. If it had been anyone else I'd have..." And the injured youth finished his sentence by an energetic gesture of the right arm.

"That's nothing. I often shake you, and you don't mind," said Jo soothingly.

That's nothing - Eso no es nada

"Pooh! You're a girl, and it's fun, but I'll allow no man to shake me!"

Pooh - Pooh

"I don't think anyone would care to try it, if you looked as much like a thundercloud as you do now. Why were you treated so?"

thundercloud - nube de truenos; nubarrón

"Just because I wouldn't say what your mother wanted me for. I'd promised not to tell, and of course I wasn't going to break my word."

"Couldn't you satisfy your grandpa in any other way?"

"No, he would have the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. I'd have told my part of the scrape, if I could without bringing Meg in. As I couldn't, I held my tongue, and bore the scolding till the old gentleman collared me. Then I bolted, for fear I should forget myself."

collared - con collar; cuello, collar, yugo

bolted - atornillado; pestillo

"It wasn't nice, but he's sorry, I know, so go down and make up. I'll help you."

"Hanged if I do! I'm not going to be lectured and pummelled by everyone, just for a bit of a frolic. I was sorry about Meg, and begged pardon like a man, but I won't do it again, when I wasn't in the wrong."

hanged - Colgado

pummelled - golpeado; golpear

"He didn't know that."

"He ought to trust me, and not act as if I was a baby. It's no use, Jo, he's got to learn that I'm able to take care of myself, and don't need anyone's apron string to hold on by."

apron string - cordón del delantal

"What pepper pots you are!" sighed Jo. "How do you mean to settle this affair?"

"Well, he ought to beg pardon, and believe me when I say I can't tell him what the fuss's about."

"Bless you! He won't do that."

"I won't go down till he does."

"Now, Teddy, be sensible. Let it pass, and I'll explain what I can. You can't stay here, so what's the use of being melodramatic?"

"I don't intend to stay here long, anyway. I'll slip off and take a journey somewhere, and when Grandpa misses me he'll come round fast enough."

slip off - salir a escondidas; quitarse; descalzarse

"I dare say, but you ought not to go and worry him."

"Don't preach. I'll go to Washington and see Brooke. It's gay there, and I'll enjoy myself after the troubles."

"What fun you'd have! I wish I could run off too," said Jo, forgetting her part of mentor in lively visions of martial life at the capital.

mentor - mentor

visions - visiones; vista, visión

martial - marcial, soldadesco, castrense

"Come on, then! Why not? You go and surprise your father, and I'll stir up old Brooke. It would be a glorious joke. Let's do it, Jo. We'll leave a letter saying we are all right, and trot off at once. I've got money enough. It will do you good, and no harm, as you go to your father."

trot - trotar

For a moment Jo looked as if she would agree, for wild as the plan was, it just suited her. She was tired of care and confinement, longed for change, and thoughts of her father blended temptingly with the novel charms of camps and hospitals, liberty and fun. Her eyes kindled as they turned wistfully toward the window, but they fell on the old house opposite, and she shook her head with sorrowful decision.

blended - mezclado; mezcla, mezclar, combinar

temptingly - Tentadoramente

sorrowful - triste

"If I was a boy, we'd run away together, and have a capital time, but as I'm a miserable girl, I must be proper and stop at home. Don't tempt me, Teddy, it's a crazy plan."

tempt - tentar

"That's the fun of it," began Laurie, who had got a willful fit on him and was possessed to break out of bounds in some way.

willful - voluntario; testarudo, obstinado

bounds - atado

"Hold your tongue!" cried Jo, covering her ears. "˜Prunes and prisms'are my doom, and I may as well make up my mind to it. I came here to moralize, not to hear things that make me skip to think of."

prunes - punes; podar

Prisms - prismas; prisma

moralize - moralizar

"I know Meg would wet-blanket such a proposal, but I thought you had more spirit," began Laurie insinuatingly.

proposal - propuesta

insinuatingly - insinuantemente

"Bad boy, be quiet! Sit down and think of your own sins, don't go making me add to mine. If I get your grandpa to apologize for the shaking, will you give up running away?" asked Jo seriously.

"Yes, but you won't do it," answered Laurie, who wished to make up, but felt that his outraged dignity must be appeased first.

outraged - indignado; atrocidad, ultraje, desafuero, atropello

appeased - paciguado; apaciguar, calmar, aplacar

"If I can manage the young one, I can the old one," muttered Jo, as she walked away, leaving Laurie bent over a railroad map with his head propped up on both hands.

Railroad - ferrocarril, checkriel

propped - apoyado; puntal

"Come in!" and Mr. Laurence's gruff voice sounded gruffer than ever, as Jo tapped at his door.

"It's only me, Sir, come to return a book," she said blandly, as she entered.

"Want any more?" asked the old gentleman, looking grim and vexed, but trying not to show it.

vexed - molesto; molestar, irritar, disgustar, afligir, atormentar

"Yes, please. I like old Sam so well, I think I'll try the second volume," returned Jo, hoping to propitiate him by accepting a second dose of Boswell's Johnson, as he had recommended that lively work.

volume - volumen

dose - dosis

Johnson - Juánez

The shaggy eyebrows unbent a little as he rolled the steps toward the shelf where the Johnsonian literature was placed. Jo skipped up, and sitting on the top step, affected to be searching for her book, but was really wondering how best to introduce the dangerous object of her visit.

shaggy - grenudo, desgrenado, despeinado, desmelenado

Mr. Laurence seemed to suspect that something was brewing in her mind, for after taking several brisk turns about the room, he faced round on her, speaking so abruptly that Rasselas tumbled face downward on the floor.

downward - hacia abajo

"What has that boy been about? Don't try to shield him. I know he has been in mischief by the way he acted when he came home. I can't get a word from him, and when I threatened to shake the truth out of him he bolted upstairs and locked himself into his room."

"He did wrong, but we forgave him, and all promised not to say a word to anyone," began Jo reluctantly.

"That won't do. He shall not shelter himself behind a promise from you softhearted girls. If he's done anything amiss, he shall confess, beg pardon, and be punished. Out with it, Jo. I won't be kept in the dark."

shelter - refugio, abrigo, amparo, asilo

Mr. Laurence looked so alarming and spoke so sharply that Jo would have gladly run away, if she could, but she was perched aloft on the steps, and he stood at the foot, a lion in the path, so she had to stay and brave it out.

"Indeed, Sir, I cannot tell. Mother forbade it. Laurie has confessed, asked pardon, and been punished quite enough. We don't keep silence to shield him, but someone else, and it will make more trouble if you interfere. Please don't. It was partly my fault, but it's all right now. So Let's forget it, and talk about the Rambler or something pleasant."

interfere - panish: t-needed

partly - en parte, en cierto modo

Let's forget it - Olvidémoslo

"Hang the Rambler! Come down and give me your word that this harum-scarum boy of mine hasn't done anything ungrateful or impertinent. If he has, after all your kindness to him, I'll thrash him with my own hands."

ungrateful - desagradecido, ingrato, malagradecido

The threat sounded awful, but did not alarm Jo, for she knew the irascible old gentleman would never lift a finger against his grandson, whatever he might say to the contrary. She obediently descended, and made as light of the prank as she could without betraying Meg or forgetting the truth.

descended - descendió; descender, bajar

betraying - traicionando; traicionar, entregar, vender, delatar, demostrar

"Hum... ha... well, if the boy held his tongue because he promised, and not from obstinacy, I'll forgive him. He's a stubborn fellow and hard to manage," said Mr. Laurence, rubbing up his hair till it looked as if he had been out in a gale, and smoothing the frown from his brow with an air of relief.

obstinacy - testarudez, porfía, terquedad, obstinación

stubborn - testarudo, obstinado, cabezota

gale - revuelo; vendaval, galerna

"So am I, but a kind word will govern me when all the king's horses and all the king's men couldn't," said Jo, trying to say a kind word for her friend, who seemed to get out of one scrape only to fall into another.

govern - gobernar

"You think I'm not kind to him, hey?" was the sharp answer.

"Oh, dear no, Sir. You are rather too kind sometimes, and then just a trifle hasty when he tries your patience. Don't you think you are?"

Jo was determined to have it out now, and tried to look quite placid, though she quaked a little after her bold speech. To her great relief and surprise, the